The information in this prospectus is not complete and may be changed. We may not sell these securities until the registration statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission is effective. This prospectus is not an offer to sell these securities and is not soliciting an offer to buy these securities in any state where the offer or sale is not permitted.

PRELIMINARY PROSPECTUS - DATED JULY 11, 2022

[ ], 2022
Prospectus
 
Touchstone ETF Trust

 Fund Ticker Symbol Principal U.S. Listing Exchange
Touchstone Dividend Select ETF
DVND NYSE Arca, Inc.
Touchstone Strategic Income Opportunities ETF
SIO NYSE Arca, Inc.
Touchstone US Large Cap Focused ETF
LCF Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc.
Touchstone Ultra Short Income ETF
TUSI Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc.

The Securities and Exchange Commission has not approved or disapproved these securities or determined if this prospectus is accurate or complete.  Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense.





Table of Contents Page
 
TOUCHSTONE DIVIDEND SELECT ETF SUMMARY
TOUCHSTONE STRATEGIC INCOME OPPORTUNITIES ETF SUMMARY
7
TOUCHSTONE US LARGE CAP FOCUSED ETF SUMMARY
13
TOUCHSTONE ULTRA SHORT INCOME ETF SUMMARY
17
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS 22
THE FUNDS’ MANAGEMENT 37
DISTRIBUTION AND FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES 42
BUYING AND SELLING SHARES 42
DISTRIBUTIONS AND TAXES 44
FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS 47



TOUCHSTONE DIVIDEND SELECT ETF SUMMARY

The Fund’s Investment Goal

The Touchstone Dividend Select ETF (the “Fund”) seeks current income and capital appreciation.
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund.  You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.55%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees(1)
0.00%
Other Expenses(2)
0.40%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.95%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
(0.28)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.67%
___________________________________________
(1)The Fund has adopted a Distribution (12b-1) Plan pursuant to which the Fund may incur and pay a Distribution (12b-1) Fee of up to a maximum of 0.25%. No such fee is currently incurred and paid by the Fund. The Fund will not incur and pay such a Distribution (12b-1) Fee until such time as approved by the Fund’s Board of Trustees (the “Board”).
(2)Other Expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
(3) Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the "Advisor" or "Touchstone Advisors") and Touchstone ETF Trust (the "Trust") have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses; expenses associated with the Fund's interfund lending program, if any; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses,” if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 0.67% of the Fund's average daily net assets. This contractual expense limitation is effective through August 31, 2023, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Advisor reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Advisor only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed either (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed or (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation. 

Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"). The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year.  Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year $68
3 Years $275

Portfolio Turnover.  The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account.  These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. The Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus and, as a result, does not yet have a portfolio turnover rate.
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
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The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of U.S. large-cap companies that have historically paid dividends. The Fund’s 80% policy is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by the Fund's Board upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. For the purpose of the Fund's 80% policy, a large capitalization company has a market capitalization within the range represented in the S&P 500 Index (between approximately $5.2 billion and $2.9 trillion as of December 31, 2021) at the time of purchase. These securities may be listed on an exchange or traded over-the-counter.

In selecting securities for the Fund, the Fund’s sub-advisor, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (the "Sub-Advisor"), seeks to invest in companies that:

Have historically paid consistent, growing dividends;
Have sustainable competitive advantages that should result in excess profits to support future dividend payments; and
Trade at reasonable valuations compared to their intrinsic value.

The Sub-Advisor believes its unique approach results in a portfolio of high quality companies with sustainable competitive advantages that should pay reliable, growing dividends at reasonable valuations. The Sub-Advisor evaluates a company’s competitive advantage by assessing its barrier(s) to entry. The barrier(s) to entry can be created through a cost advantage, economies of scale, high customer loyalty, or a government barrier (e.g., license or subsidy). The Sub-Advisor believes that the strongest barrier to entry is the combination of economies of scale and higher customer loyalty.

The Fund will generally hold 40 to 55 companies, with residual cash and cash equivalents expected to represent less than 10% of the Fund’s net assets. The Fund may, at times, hold fewer securities and a higher percentage of cash and cash equivalents when, among other reasons, the Sub-Advisor cannot find a sufficient number of securities that meets its purchase requirements.

The Fund will generally sell a security if the security does not meet portfolio guidelines, if the security stops paying a dividend and future prospects of paying a dividend are limited, or if better opportunities exist based on the fundamentals and valuation of the business.

The Fund’s Principal Risks

The Fund’s share price will fluctuate. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could also return less than other investments.  Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any ETF, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal.  You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.

Equity Securities Risk: The Fund is subject to the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments, as a result of irregular and/or unexpected trading activity among retail investors. The prices of securities issued by these companies may decline in response to such developments, which could result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s shares.

Large-Cap Risk: Large-cap companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.

Dividend Risk: There is no guarantee that the companies in which the Fund invests will declare dividends in the future or that dividends, if declared, will remain at current levels or increase over time. Securities that pay dividends may be sensitive to changes in interest rates, and as interest rates rise or fall, the prices of such securities may fall.

ETF Risk: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”), which are responsible for the creation and redemption activity for the Fund. To the extent APs exit the business, become unable or are otherwise unwilling to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund and no other AP steps in to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a material discount to net asset value (“NAV”) and possibly face delisting from the Exchange.

4


Premium/Discount Risk: As with all ETFs, Fund shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. There may be times when the trading prices of Fund shares in the secondary market are more than the NAV (a premium) or less than the NAV (a discount). As a result, shareholders of the Fund may pay more than NAV when purchasing shares and receive less than NAV when selling Fund shares. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility or periods of steep market declines. In such market conditions, market or stop loss orders to sell Fund shares may be executed at prices well below a Fund's NAV.

Secondary Market Trading Risk: Investors buying or selling shares in the secondary market will normally pay brokerage commissions, which are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors buying or selling relatively small amounts of Fund shares. Secondary market trading is subject to bid-ask spreads and trading in Fund shares may be halted by the Exchange because of market conditions or other reasons. If a trading halt occurs, a shareholder may temporarily be unable to purchase or sell shares of the Fund. In addition, although the Fund’s shares are listed on the Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for shares will develop or be maintained or that the Fund’s shares will continue to be listed.

Management Risk : In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Advisor engages one or more sub-advisors to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Advisor may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisors who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisors. In addition, t he value of your investment may decrease if the Fund's portfolio managers incorrectly judge the attractiveness, value, or market trends affecting a particular security, issuer, industry, or sector.

Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate.  

Value Investing Risk : Value investing presents the risk that the Fund’s security holdings may never reach their full intrinsic value because the market fails to recognize what the portfolio managers consider the true business value or because the portfolio managers have misjudged those values. There is also the risk that the portfolio managers may determine to sell a position prior to it reaching its intrinsic value.

The Fund’s Performance

The Fund’s performance information is only shown when it has had a full calendar year of operations. Since the Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus, there is no performance information included in this prospectus.

The Fund’s Management

Investment Advisor

Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund's investment advisor.
Sub-Advisor   Portfolio Managers   Investment Experience 
with the Fund
  Primary Title with Sub-Advisor
Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc.   Austin R. Kummer, CFA Since inception in [ ] 2022 Vice President, Senior Portfolio Manager
Brendan M. White, CFA Since inception in [ ] 2022 Senior Vice President, Co-Chief Investment Officer and Portfolio Manager
James E. Wilhelm, Jr. Since inception in [ ] 2022 Managing Director, Senior Portfolio Manager

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund is an ETF. Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is
5


willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (“bid”) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares (“ask”) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at TouchstoneInvestments.com/ETFs.

Tax Information

The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.

Financial Intermediary Compensation

If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services.  These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment.  Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
6


TOUCHSTONE STRATEGIC INCOME OPPORTUNITIES ETF SUMMARY
 
The Fund’s Investment Goal

The Touchstone Strategic Income Opportunities ETF (the “Fund”) seeks a high level of current income with a focus on capital preservation.
 
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund.  You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.55%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees(1)
0.00%
Other Expenses(2)
0.42%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.97%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
(0.32)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.65%
___________________________________________
(1)The Fund has adopted a Distribution (12b-1) Plan pursuant to which the Fund may incur and pay a Distribution (12b-1) Fee of up to a maximum of 0.25%. No such fee is currently incurred and paid by the Fund. The Fund will not incur and pay such a Distribution (12b-1) Fee until such time as approved by the Fund’s Board of Trustees (the “Board”).
(2)Other Expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
(3) Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the "Advisor" or "Touchstone Advisors") and Touchstone ETF Trust (the "Trust") have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses; expenses associated with the Fund's interfund lending program, if any; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses,” if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 0.65% of the Fund's average daily net assets. This contractual expense limitation is effective through August 31, 2023, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Advisor reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Advisor only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed either (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed or (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation. 
 
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"). The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year.  Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year $66
3 Years $277

Portfolio Turnover.  The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account.  These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. The Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus and, as a result, does not yet have a portfolio turnover rate.
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
7



The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in income producing fixed-income securities. This is a non-fundamental investment policy that the Fund's Board can change upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. Income producing securities generally include corporate debt securities, mortgage-related securities, asset-backed securities, government securities (both U.S. government securities and foreign sovereign debt), and preferred stocks. The Fund will engage in frequent and active trading as part of its principal investment strategies.

The Fund’s sub-advisor, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (“Fort Washington”), seeks to employ a high conviction, yield-oriented investment approach with a relatively focused number of issuers, coupled with sector diversification and diligent risk management intended to result in attractive risk-adjusted returns via high levels of income. In selecting individual securities for the Fund, Fort Washington applies a rigorous bottom-up security selection process. A key characteristic of this process is the identification and implementation of high conviction ideas that can result in meaningful alpha generation. Fort Washington utilizes a variety of proprietary tools to assist with security screening and analysis.

A starting point for Fort Washington's identification of attractive opportunities is the quantification of return potential along with associated risk. Fort Washington seeks to identify opportunities with the highest level of expected return relative to the risk. Fort Washington quantifies risk as downside risk (i.e., what can happen in a recession), not volatility. The quantification of risk and reward are an important part of the investment process that is combined with the company specific credit analysis.

In building the Fund’s portfolio, Fort Washington invests at least 50% of the Fund's portfolio in investment-grade rated debt securities. The Fund may also invest up to 50% of the Fund's portfolio in non-investment-grade debt securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities are often referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative. The Fund's investment policies are based on credit ratings at the time of purchase. The proportion of non-investment grade debt is influenced by the top-down component of Fort Washington’s investment process that assesses the current macro environment focusing on trends in the global economy, financial conditions, sentiment, and valuation. Generally, the exposure to non-investment grade debt increases when credit spreads are wide, taking account of economic growth, financial conditions, and sentiment.The Fund may also invest up to 20% of its total assets in income producing fixed-income securities that are emerging markets debt securities denominated in either the U.S. dollar or a foreign currency.

Additionally, in order to implement its investment strategy, the Fund may invest in mortgage dollar-roll transactions, reverse repurchase agreements, and other derivatives, including forwards, futures contracts, interest rate and credit default swap agreements, and options. These investments may be used to gain or hedge market exposure, to adjust the Fund’s duration, to manage interest rate risk, and for any other purposes consistent with the Fund’s investment strategies and limitations. Outside of the Fund's policy to invest at least 80% of its assets in income producing fixed-income securities, the Fund may also invest up to 20% of its assets in public equities.

The Fund will generally sell a security if the price/yield no longer adequately compensates for the risk profile or if there is a change to allocation between sectors based on relative value.

The Fund’s Principal Risks

The Fund’s share price will fluctuate.  You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could return less than other investments.  Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any ETF, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal.  You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.

Fixed-Income Risk: The market value of the Fund’s fixed-income securities responds to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to perceptions about the creditworthiness of individual issuers, including governments. Generally, the Fund’s fixed-income securities will decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall. Normally, the longer the maturity or duration of the fixed-income securities the Fund owns, the more sensitive the value of the Fund’s shares will be to changes in interest rates.

Non-Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Non-investment-grade debt securities are sometimes referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative with respect to their issuers’ ability to make payments of interest and principal. There is a high risk that the Fund could suffer a loss from investments in non-investment-grade debt securities caused by the default of an issuer of such securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities may also be less liquid than investment-grade debt securities.

8


Asset-Backed Securities Risk: Asset-backed securities are fixed-income securities backed by other assets such as credit card, automobile or consumer loan receivables, retail installment loans, or participations in pools of leases. The values of these securities are sensitive to changes in the credit quality of the underlying collateral, the credit strength of any credit enhancement feature, changes in interest rates, and, at times, the financial condition of the issuer. 

Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk:  Mortgage-backed securities are fixed-income securities representing an interest in a pool of underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities are sensitive to changes in interest rates, but may respond to these changes differently from other fixed-income securities due to the possibility of prepayment of the underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities may fluctuate in price based on deterioration in the value of the collateral underlying the pool of mortgage loans, which may result in the collateral being worth less than the remaining principal amount owed on the mortgages in the pool.

Credit Risk: The fixed-income securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to the possibility that a deterioration, whether sudden or gradual, in the financial condition of an issuer, or a deterioration in general economic conditions, could cause an issuer to fail to make timely payments of principal or interest, when due. This may cause the issuer’s securities to decline in value.
 
Interest Rate Risk: In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of debt securities fall, and when interest rates fall, the prices of debt securities rise. The price volatility of a debt security also depends on its maturity. Longer-term securities are generally more volatile, so the longer the average maturity or duration of these securities, the greater their price risk. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates that incorporates a security’s yield, coupon, final maturity, and call features, among other characteristics. The longer a fixed-income security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Maturity, on the other hand, is the date on which a fixed-income security becomes due for payment of principal. Recent and potential future changes in government policy may affect interest rates.

Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Investment-grade debt securities may be downgraded by a nationally recognized statistical rating organization ("NRSRO") to below-investment-grade status, which would increase the risk of holding these securities. Investment-grade debt securities rated in the lowest rating category by a NRSRO involve a higher degree of risk than fixed-income securities with higher credit ratings.

U.S. Government Securities Risk: Certain U.S. government securities are backed by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury while others are supported only by the credit of the issuer or instrumentality. While the U.S. government is able to provide financial support to U.S. government-sponsored agencies or instrumentalities, no assurance can be given that it will always do so. Such securities are generally neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.

Prepayment Risk: The risk that a debt security may be paid off and proceeds reinvested earlier than anticipated. Prepayment impacts both the interest rate sensitivity of the underlying asset, such as an asset-backed or mortgage-backed security and its cash flow projections. Therefore, prepayment risk may make it difficult to calculate the average duration of the Fund’s asset- or mortgage-backed securities which in turn would make it difficult to assess the interest rate risk of the Fund.

ETF Risk: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”), which are responsible for the creation and redemption activity for the Fund. To the extent APs exit the business, become unable or are otherwise unwilling to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund and no other AP steps in to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a material discount to net asset value (“NAV”) and possibly face delisting from the Exchange.

Premium/Discount Risk: As with all ETFs, Fund shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. There may be times when the trading prices of Fund shares in the secondary market are more than the NAV (a premium) or less than the NAV (a discount). As a result, shareholders of the Fund may pay more than NAV when purchasing shares and receive less than NAV when selling Fund shares. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility or periods of steep market declines. In such market conditions, market or stop loss orders to sell Fund shares may be executed at prices well below a Fund's NAV.

9


Secondary Market Trading Risk: Investors buying or selling shares in the secondary market will normally pay brokerage commissions, which are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors buying or selling relatively small amounts of Fund shares. Secondary market trading is subject to bid-ask spreads and trading in Fund shares may be halted by the Exchange because of market conditions or other reasons. If a trading halt occurs, a shareholder may temporarily be unable to purchase or sell shares of the Fund. In addition, although the Fund’s shares are listed on the Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for shares will develop or be maintained or that the Fund’s shares will continue to be listed.

Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Advisor engages one or more sub-advisors to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Advisor may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisors who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisors. In addition, t he value of your investment may decrease if the Fund's portfolio managers incorrectly judge the attractiveness, value, or market trends affecting a particular security, issuer, industry, or sector.

Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.

Equity Securities Risk: The Fund is subject to the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments, or as a result of irregular and/or unexpected trading activity among retail investors. The prices of securities issued by these companies may decline in response to such developments, which could result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s shares.

Preferred Stock Risk: In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds take precedence over the claims of those who own preferred and common stock. If interest rates rise, the fixed dividend on preferred stocks may be less attractive, causing the price of preferred stocks to decline.

Foreign Securities Risk: Investing in foreign securities poses additional risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers, while such events may not necessarily affect the U.S. economy or issuers located in the United States. In addition, investments in foreign securities are generally denominated in foreign currency. As a result, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect (positively or negatively) the value of the Fund's investments. There are also risks associated with foreign accounting standards, government regulation, market information, and clearance and settlement procedures. Foreign markets may be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets and offer less protection to investors.

Emerging Markets Risk: Emerging markets may be more likely to experience political turmoil or rapid changes in market or economic conditions than more developed countries. In addition, the financial stability of issuers (including governments) in emerging market countries may be more precarious than that of issuers in developed market countries.

Sovereign Debt Risk: The actions of foreign governments concerning their respective economies could have an important effect on their ability or willingness to service their sovereign debt. Such actions could have significant effects on market conditions and on the prices of securities and instruments held by the Fund, including the securities and instruments of foreign private issuers.

Derivatives Risk: The use of derivatives may expose the Fund to additional risks that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives. Risks associated with derivatives may include the risk that the derivative does not correlate well with the security, index, or currency to which it relates, the risk that the Fund will be unable to sell or close out the derivative due to an illiquid market, the risk that the counterparty may be unwilling or unable to meet its obligations, and the risk that the derivative could expose the Fund to the risk of magnified losses resulting from leverage. These additional risks could cause the Fund to experience losses to which it would otherwise not be subject.
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Leverage Risk: Leverage occurs when the Fund uses borrowings, derivatives (such as futures or options), or similar instruments or techniques to gain exposure to investments in an amount that exceeds the Fund's initial investment. The use of leverage magnifies changes in the Fund's net asset value and thus may result in increased portfolio volatility and increased risk of loss. Leverage can create an interest expense that may lower the Fund’s overall returns. There can be no guarantee that a leveraging strategy will be successful.

Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contract Risk: A forward foreign currency exchange contract is an agreement to buy or sell a specific currency at a future date and at a price set at the time of the contract. Forward foreign currency exchange contracts may reduce the risk of loss from a change in value of a currency, but they also limit any potential gains and do not protect against fluctuations in the value of the underlying position.

Futures Contracts Risk: The risks associated with the Fund’s futures positions include liquidity and counterparty risks associated with derivative instruments.

Options Risk: Options trading is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The value of options can be highly volatile, and their use can result in loss if the sub-advisor is incorrect in its expectation of price fluctuations. Options, whether exchange-traded or over-the-counter, may also be illiquid.

Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements (“swaps”) are individually negotiated and structured to include exposure to a variety of different types of investments or market factors. Swaps may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the investments of the Fund and its share price. The performance of swaps may be affected by a change in the specific interest rate, currency, or other factors that determine the amounts of payments due to and from the Fund. A swap can be a form of leverage, which can magnify the Fund’s gains or losses.

Mortgage Dollar Roll Risk: Mortgage “dollar rolls” are transactions in which mortgage-backed securities are sold for delivery in the current month and the seller simultaneously contracts to repurchase substantially similar securities on a specified future date. If the broker-dealer to whom the Fund sells the security becomes insolvent, the Fund’s right to repurchase the security may be restricted. Other risks involved in entering into mortgage dollar rolls include the risk that the value of the security may change adversely over the term of the mortgage dollar roll and that the security the Fund is required to repurchase may be worth less than the security that the Fund held.

Portfolio Turnover Risk: Frequent and active trading may result in greater expenses to the Fund, which may lower the Fund's performance and may result in the realization of substantial capital gains, including net short-term capital gains. As a result, high portfolio turnover may reduce the Fund's returns.
 
Repurchase Agreement Risk: Under all repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund, the Fund’s custodian or its agent must take possession of the underlying collateral.  However, if the counterparty defaults, the Fund could realize a loss on the sale of the underlying security to the extent that the proceeds of sale, including accrued interest, are less than the resale price provided in the agreement including interest.  In addition, even though the Bankruptcy Code provides protection for most repurchase agreements, if the seller should be involved in bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, the Fund may incur delay and costs in selling the underlying security or may suffer a loss of principal and interest if the Fund is treated as an unsecured creditor and is required to return the underlying security to the seller’s estate.  Repurchase agreements are considered loans by the Fund.

The Fund’s Performance

The Fund’s performance information is only shown when it has had a full calendar year of operations. Since the Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus, there is no performance information included in this prospectus.

The Fund’s Management
 
Investment Advisor
 
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund's investment advisor.
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Sub-Advisor   Portfolio Managers   Investment Experience 
with the Fund
  Primary Title with Sub-Advisor
Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. Daniel J. Carter, CFA Since inception in [ ] 2022 Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager
  Austin R. Kummer, CFA Since inception in [ ] 2022 Vice President, Senior Portfolio Manager
Brendan M. White, CFA Since inception in [ ] 2022 Senior Vice President, Co-Chief Investment Officer and Portfolio Manager

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund is an ETF. Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (“bid”) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares (“ask”) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at TouchstoneInvestments.com/ETFs.

Tax Information

The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.
 
Financial Intermediary Compensation
 
If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services.  These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment.  Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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TOUCHSTONE US LARGE CAP FOCUSED ETF SUMMARY
 
The Fund’s Investment Goal

The Touchstone US Large Cap Focused ETF (the “Fund”) seeks to provide investors with capital appreciation.
 
The Fund’s Fees and Expenses

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund.  You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.70%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees(1)
0.00%
Other Expenses(2)
0.40%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 1.10%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
(0.41)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.69%
___________________________________________
(1)The Fund has adopted a Distribution (12b-1) Plan pursuant to which the Fund may incur and pay a Distribution (12b-1) Fee of up to a maximum of 0.25%. No such fee is currently incurred and paid by the Fund. The Fund will not incur and pay such a Distribution (12b-1) Fee until such time as approved by the Fund’s Board of Trustees (the “Board”).
(2)Other Expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
(3) Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the "Advisor" or "Touchstone Advisors") and Touchstone ETF Trust (the "Trust") have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses; expenses associated with the Fund's interfund lending program, if any; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses,” if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 0.69% of the Fund's average daily net assets. This contractual expense limitation is effective through August 31, 2023, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Advisor reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Advisor only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed either (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed or (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation. 
 
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"). The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year.  Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year $70
3 Years $309

Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. The Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus and, as a result, does not yet have a portfolio turnover rate.
 
The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
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The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in U.S.-listed large capitalization equity securities. For the purpose of the Fund's 80% policy, a large capitalization company has a market capitalization, at the time of purchase, above $5 billion. The Fund’s 80% policy is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by the Fund's Board upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. Equity securities generally include common stock. These securities may be listed on an exchange or traded over-the-counter.

In selecting securities for the Fund, the Fund’s sub-advisor, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (“Fort Washington”), seeks to invest in companies that:

Are trading below its estimate of the companies’ intrinsic value; and
Have sustainable competitive advantages in place. Fort Washington evaluates a company’s competitive advantage by assessing its barrier(s) to entry. A company's barrier(s) to entry can be created through a cost advantage, economies of scale, high customer loyalty, or a government barrier (e.g., license or subsidy). Fort Washington believes that the strongest barrier to entry is the combination of economies of scale and higher customer loyalty.

The Fund is non-diversified and, therefore may, from time to time, have significant exposure to a limited number of issuers. The Fund will generally hold 25 to 45 companies, with residual cash and cash equivalents expected to represent less than 10% of the Fund’s net assets. The Fund may, at times, hold fewer securities and a higher percentage of cash and cash equivalents when, among other reasons, Fort Washington cannot find a sufficient number of securities that meet its purchase requirements. Although the Fund may invest in any economic sector, at times it may emphasize one or more particular sectors.

The Fund will generally sell a security if it reaches Fort Washington’s estimate of fair value, if a more attractive investment opportunity is available, or if a structural change has taken place and Fort Washington cannot reliably estimate the impact of the change on the business fundamentals.
The Fund’s Principal Risks

The Fund’s share price will fluctuate.  You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could return less than other investments.  Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other federal government agency. As with any ETF, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal.  You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.

Equity Securities Risk: The Fund is subject to the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments, or as a result of irregular and/or unexpected trading activity among retail investors. The prices of securities issued by these companies may decline in response to such developments, which could result in a decline in the value of the Fund’s shares.

Large-Cap Risk: Large-cap companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.

Mid-Cap Risk:  Stocks of mid-sized companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than stocks of larger, more established companies. Mid-sized companies may have limited product lines or financial resources, and may be dependent upon a particular niche of the market.

Non-Diversification Risk: The Fund is non-diversified, which means that it may invest a greater percentage of its assets than a diversified ETF in the securities of a limited number of issuers. The use of a non-diversified investment strategy may increase the volatility of the Fund’s investment performance, as the Fund may be more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, political or regulatory event.

ETF Risk: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”), which are responsible for the creation and redemption activity for the Fund. To the extent APs exit the business, become unable or are otherwise unwilling to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund and no other AP steps in to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a material discount to net asset value (“NAV”) and possibly face delisting from the Exchange.
14



Premium/Discount Risk: As with all ETFs, Fund shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. There may be times when the trading prices of Fund shares in the secondary market are more than the NAV (a premium) or less than the NAV (a discount). As a result, shareholders of the Fund may pay more than NAV when purchasing shares and receive less than NAV when selling Fund shares. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility or periods of steep market declines. In such market conditions, market or stop loss orders to sell Fund shares may be executed at prices well below a Fund's NAV.

Secondary Market Trading Risk: Investors buying or selling shares in the secondary market will normally pay brokerage commissions, which are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors buying or selling relatively small amounts of Fund shares. Secondary market trading is subject to bid-ask spreads and trading in Fund shares may be halted by the Exchange because of market conditions or other reasons. If a trading halt occurs, a shareholder may temporarily be unable to purchase or sell shares of the Fund. In addition, although the Fund’s shares are listed on the Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for shares will develop or be maintained or that the Fund’s shares will continue to be listed.

Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Advisor engages one or more sub-advisors to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Advisor may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisors who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisors. In addition, t he value of your investment may decrease if the Fund's portfolio managers incorrectly judge the attractiveness, value, or market trends affecting a particular security, issuer, industry, or sector.

Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.

Sector Focus Risk: A fund that focuses its investments in the securities of a particular market sector is subject to the risk that adverse circumstances will have a greater impact on the fund than a fund that does not focus its investments in a particular sector.

The Fund’s Performance
 
The Fund’s performance information is only shown when it has had a full calendar year of operations. Since the Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus, there is no performance information included in this prospectus.

The Fund’s Management

Investment Advisor
 
Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund's investment advisor.
Sub-Advisor   Portfolio Manager   Investment Experience
with the Fund
  Primary Title with Sub-Advisor
Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc.   James E. Wilhelm, Jr.   Since inception in [ ] 2022   Managing Director & Senior Portfolio Manager

Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund is an ETF. Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price,
15


and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (“bid”) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares (“ask”) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at TouchstoneInvestments.com/ETFs.

Tax Information

The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.

Financial Intermediary Compensation
 
If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services.  These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment.  Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.



16


TOUCHSTONE ULTRA SHORT INCOME ETF SUMMARY
 
The Fund’s Investment Goal
 
The Touchstone Ultra Short Income ETF (the “Fund”) seeks maximum total return consistent with the preservation of capital.

The Fund’s Fees and Expenses

This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund.  You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below.

Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
Management Fees 0.25%
Distribution and/or Shareholder Service (12b-1) Fees(1)
0.00%
Other Expenses(2)
0.36%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.61%
Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
(0.27)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and/or Expense Reimbursement(3)
0.34%
___________________________________________
(1)The Fund has adopted a Distribution (12b-1) Plan pursuant to which the Fund may incur and pay a Distribution (12b-1) Fee of up to a maximum of 0.25%. No such fee is currently incurred and paid by the Fund. The Fund will not incur and pay such a Distribution (12b-1) Fee until such time as approved by the Fund’s Board of Trustees (the “Board”).
(2)Other Expenses are based on estimated amounts for the current fiscal year.
(3) Touchstone Advisors, Inc. (the "Advisor" or "Touchstone Advisors") and Touchstone ETF Trust (the "Trust") have entered into a contractual expense limitation agreement whereby Touchstone Advisors will waive a portion of its fees or reimburse certain Fund expenses (excluding dividend and interest expenses relating to short sales; interest; taxes; brokerage commissions and other transaction costs; portfolio transaction and investment related expenses; expenses associated with the Fund's interfund lending program, if any; other expenditures which are capitalized in accordance with U.S. generally accepted accounting principles; the cost of “Acquired Fund Fees and Expenses,” if any; and other extraordinary expenses not incurred in the ordinary course of business) in order to limit annual Fund operating expenses to 0.34% of the Fund's average daily net assets. This contractual expense limitation is effective through August 31, 2023, but can be terminated by a vote of the Board if it deems the termination to be beneficial to the Fund’s shareholders. The terms of the contractual expense limitation agreement provide that Touchstone Advisors is entitled to recoup, subject to approval by the Board, such amounts waived or reimbursed for a period of up to three years from the date on which the Advisor reduced its compensation or assumed expenses for the Fund. The Fund will make repayments to the Advisor only if such repayment does not cause the annual Fund operating expenses (after the repayment is taken into account) to exceed either (1) the expense cap in place when such amounts were waived or reimbursed or (2) the Fund’s current expense limitation. 

Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other exchange-traded funds ("ETFs"). The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as indicated, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods.  The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year, that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same and that all fee waivers or expense limits for the Fund will expire after one year.  Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:

1 Year $ 35 
3 Years $ 168 
Portfolio Turnover.  The Fund pays transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in total annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. The Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus and, as a result, does not yet have a portfolio turnover rate.

The Fund’s Principal Investment Strategies
 
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The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in fixed-income securities. This is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by the Fund's Board upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. The Fund invests in a diversified portfolio of securities of different maturities, including U.S. Treasury securities, U.S. government agency securities, securities of U.S. government-sponsored enterprises, corporate bonds (including those of foreign issuers), mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, municipal bonds, collateralized loan obligations and cash equivalent securities including repurchase agreements, commercial paper and variable rate demand notes.

The Fund invests primarily in investment-grade debt securities. Investment-grade debt securities are those having a rating of BBB-/Baa3 or higher from a nationally recognized statistical rating organization ("NRSRO") or, if a rating is not available, deemed to be of comparable quality by the sub-advisor, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. ("Fort Washington"). The Fund's investment policies are based on credit ratings at the time of purchase. The Fund can also invest up to 15% of its net assets in non-investment-grade debt securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities are often referred to as "junk bonds" and are considered speculative.

The Fund’s investment strategy places a greater emphasis on fixed-income securities that are structured products, and therefore the Fund expects to maintain a greater exposure to the structured products sectors (i.e., mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, and collateralized loan obligations) than other types of fixed-income securities. Fort Washington also expects to maintain a meaningful exposure to corporate credit. The remainder of Fund assets are expected to be invested in other sectors, which may include municipal bonds, U.S. Treasuries, and various types of cash-equivalent securities. Fort Washington’s targeted sector and risk positioning for the Fund will vary in different types of market conditions.

In selecting investments for the Fund, Fort Washington chooses fixed-income securities that it believes are attractively priced relative to the market or to similar instruments. An investment may be determined to be “attractively priced” if it is offered at a level that is expected to yield a return greater than it historically has and/or a greater return than generally available in the market for other securities of a similar risk profile (i.e., similar credit quality, duration, liquidity and expected volatility).

In addition, Fort Washington considers the “effective duration” of the Fund’s entire portfolio. Effective duration is a measure of a security’s price volatility or the risk associated with changes in interest rates. While the Fund may invest in securities with any maturity or duration, Fort Washington seeks to maintain an effective duration for the Fund of one year or less under normal market conditions.

The Fund may engage in frequent and active trading of securities as a part of its principal investment strategy.

The Fund’s Principal Risks
 
The Fund’s share price will fluctuate. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund and the Fund could also return less than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not bank guaranteed, are not deposits, and are not insured by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (the "FDIC") or any other federal government agency. As with any ETF, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment goal.  You can find more information about the Fund’s investments and risks under the “Principal Investment Strategies and Risks” section of the Fund’s prospectus. The Fund is subject to the principal risks summarized below.

Fixed-Income Risk: The market value of the Fund’s fixed-income securities responds to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to perceptions about the creditworthiness of individual issuers, including governments. Generally, the Fund’s fixed-income securities will decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall. Normally, the longer the maturity or duration of the fixed-income securities the Fund owns, the more sensitive the value of the Fund’s shares will be to changes in interest rates.

Asset-Backed Securities Risk: Asset-backed securities are fixed-income securities backed by other assets such as credit card, automobile or consumer loan receivables, retail installment loans, or participations in pools of leases. The values of these securities are sensitive to changes in the credit quality of the underlying collateral, the credit strength of any credit enhancement feature, changes in interest rates, and, at times, the financial condition of the issuer.

Credit Risk: The fixed-income securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to the possibility that a deterioration, whether sudden or gradual, in the financial condition of an issuer, or a deterioration in general economic conditions, could cause an issuer to fail to make timely payments of principal or interest, when due. This may cause the issuer’s securities to decline in value.
18


 
Interest Rate Risk: In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of debt securities fall, and when interest rates fall, the prices of debt securities rise. The price volatility of a debt security also depends on its maturity. Longer-term securities are generally more volatile, so the longer the average maturity or duration of these securities, the greater their price risk. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates that incorporates a security’s yield, coupon, final maturity, and call features, among other characteristics. The longer a fixed-income security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Maturity, on the other hand, is the date on which a fixed-income security becomes due for payment of principal. Recent and potential future changes in government policy may affect interest rates.

Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Investment-grade debt securities may be downgraded by a NRSRO to below-investment-grade status, which would increase the risk of holding these securities. Investment-grade debt securities rated in the lowest rating category by a NRSRO involve a higher degree of risk than fixed-income securities with higher credit ratings.

Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk:  Mortgage-backed securities are fixed-income securities representing an interest in a pool of underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities are sensitive to changes in interest rates, but may respond to these changes differently from other fixed-income securities due to the possibility of prepayment of the underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities may fluctuate in price based on deterioration in the value of the collateral underlying the pool of mortgage loans, which may result in the collateral being worth less than the remaining principal amount owed on the mortgages in the pool.

Non-Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Non-investment-grade debt securities are sometimes referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative with respect to their issuers’ ability to make payments of interest and principal. There is a high risk that the Fund could suffer a loss from investments in non-investment-grade debt securities caused by the default of an issuer of such securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities may also be less liquid than investment-grade debt securities.

Prepayment Risk: The risk that a debt security may be paid off and proceeds reinvested earlier than anticipated. Prepayment impacts both the interest rate sensitivity of the underlying asset, such as an asset-backed or mortgage-backed security and its cash flow projections. Therefore, prepayment risk may make it difficult to calculate the average duration of the Fund’s asset- or mortgage-backed securities which in turn would make it difficult to assess the interest rate risk of the Fund.

U.S. Government Securities Risk: Certain U.S. government securities are backed by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury while others are supported only by the credit of the issuer or instrumentality. While the U.S. government is able to provide financial support to U.S. government-sponsored agencies or instrumentalities, no assurance can be given that it will always do so. Such securities are generally neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.

ETF Risk: As an ETF, the Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”), which are responsible for the creation and redemption activity for the Fund. To the extent APs exit the business, become unable or are otherwise unwilling to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund and no other AP steps in to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a material discount to net asset value (“NAV”) and possibly face delisting from the Exchange.

Premium/Discount Risk: As with all ETFs, Fund shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. There may be times when the trading prices of Fund shares in the secondary market are more than the NAV (a premium) or less than the NAV (a discount). As a result, shareholders of the Fund may pay more than NAV when purchasing shares and receive less than NAV when selling Fund shares. This risk is heightened in times of market volatility or periods of steep market declines. In such market conditions, market or stop loss orders to sell Fund shares may be executed at prices well below a Fund's NAV.

Secondary Market Trading Risk: Investors buying or selling shares in the secondary market will normally pay brokerage commissions, which are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors buying or selling relatively small amounts of Fund shares. Secondary market trading is subject to bid-ask spreads and trading in Fund shares may be halted by the Exchange because of market conditions or other reasons. If a trading halt
19


occurs, a shareholder may temporarily be unable to purchase or sell shares of the Fund. In addition, although the Fund’s shares are listed on the Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for shares will develop or be maintained or that the Fund’s shares will continue to be listed.

Management Risk: In managing the Fund’s portfolio, the Advisor engages one or more sub-advisors to make investment decisions for a portion of or the entire portfolio. There is a risk that the Advisor may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisors who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisors. In addition, t he value of your investment may decrease if the Fund's portfolio managers incorrectly judge the attractiveness, value, or market trends affecting a particular security, issuer, industry, or sector.

Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in the U.S. and global financial markets, including actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, may at times, and for varying periods of time, result in unusually high market volatility, which could negatively impact the Fund’s performance and cause the Fund to experience illiquidity, shareholder redemptions, or other potentially adverse effects. Reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets could negatively affect issuers worldwide. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate. In addition, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could have a substantial impact on a Fund. Such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.

Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk: Typically, collateralized loan obligations are privately offered and sold, and thus are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, the Fund may in certain circumstances characterize its investments in collateralized loan obligations as illiquid. Collateralized loan obligations are subject to the typical risks associated with debt instruments (i.e., interest rate risk and credit risk). Additional risks of collateralized loan obligations include the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will be insufficient to make interest or other payments, the potential for a decline in the quality of the collateral, and the possibility that the Fund may invest in a subordinate tranche of a collateralized loan obligation.

Foreign Securities Risk: Investing in foreign securities poses additional risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers, while such events may not necessarily affect the U.S. economy or issuers located in the United States. In addition, investments in foreign securities are generally denominated in foreign currency. As a result, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect (positively or negatively) the value of the Fund's investments. There are also risks associated with foreign accounting standards, government regulation, market information, and clearance and settlement procedures. Foreign markets may be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets and offer less protection to investors.

Municipal Securities Risk:  The value of municipal securities may be affected by uncertainties in the municipal market related to legislation or litigation involving the taxation of municipal securities or the rights of municipal securities holders in the event of bankruptcy. In addition, a downturn in the national economy may negatively impact the economic performance of issuers of municipal securities, and may increase the likelihood that issuers of securities in which the Fund may invest may be unable to meet their obligations. Also, some municipal obligations may be backed by a letter of credit issued by a bank or other financial institution. Adverse developments affecting banks or other financial institutions could have a negative effect on the value of the Fund’s portfolio securities.
 
Portfolio Turnover Risk: Frequent and active trading may result in greater expenses to the Fund, which may lower the Fund's performance and may result in the realization of substantial capital gains, including net short-term capital gains. As a result, high portfolio turnover may reduce the Fund's returns.
 
Repurchase Agreement Risk: Under all repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund, the Fund’s custodian or its agent must take possession of the underlying collateral.  However, if the counterparty defaults, the Fund could realize a loss on the sale of the underlying security to the extent that the proceeds of sale, including accrued interest, are less than the resale price provided in the agreement including interest.  In addition, even though the Bankruptcy Code provides protection for most repurchase agreements, if the seller should be involved in bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, the Fund may incur delay and costs in selling the underlying security or may suffer a loss of principal and interest if the Fund is treated as an unsecured creditor and is required to return the underlying security to the seller’s estate.  Repurchase agreements are considered loans by the Fund.
 
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The Fund’s Performance

The Fund’s performance information is only shown when it has had a full calendar year of operations. Since the Fund had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus, there is no performance information included in this prospectus.

The Fund’s Management
 
Investment Advisor

Touchstone Advisors, Inc. serves as the Fund's investment advisor.

Sub-Advisor   Portfolio
Managers
 
Investment Experience
 with the Fund
  Primary Title with  
Sub-Advisor
Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc.   Scott D. Weston   Since inception in [ ] 2022   Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager
    Brent A. Miller, CFA   Since inception in [ ] 2022   Vice President and Senior Portfolio Manager
Laura L. Mayfield
Since inception in [ ] 2022
Senior Portfolio Manager
Buying and Selling Fund Shares

The Fund is an ETF. Individual Fund shares may only be purchased and sold on a national securities exchange through a broker-dealer and may not be purchased or redeemed directly with the Fund. The price of Fund shares is based on market price, and because ETF shares trade at market prices rather than NAV, shares may trade at a price greater than NAV (a premium) or less than NAV (a discount). An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase shares of the Fund (“bid”) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for shares (“ask”) when buying or selling shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including information about the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is included on the Fund’s website at TouchstoneInvestments.com/ETFs.

Tax Information
 
The Fund intends to make distributions that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains except when shares are held through a tax-advantaged account, such as a 401(k) plan or an IRA. Withdrawals from a tax-advantaged account, however, may be taxable.
 
Financial Intermediary Compensation
 
If you purchase shares in the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services.  These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other financial intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment.  Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.

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PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS

How Do The Funds Implement Their Investment Goal?

The investment goal(s) and principal investment strategies of Touchstone Dividend Select ETF ("Dividend Select ETF"), Touchstone Strategic Income Opportunities ETF ("Strategic Income Opportunities ETF"), Touchstone US Large Cap Focused ETF ("US Large Cap Focused ETF") and Touchstone Ultra Short Income ETF ("Ultra Short Income ETF") (each, a “Fund” and collectively, the “Funds”) are described in the "Principal Investment Strategies" sections in each Fund's summary above.

The Funds are actively managed exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”). Shares of the Dividend Select ETF (ticker: DVND) and the Strategic Income Opportunities ETF (ticker: SIO) are listed for trading on NYSE Arca, Inc. and shares of US Large Cap Focused ETF (ticker: LCF) and the Ultra Short Income ETF (ticker: TUSI) are listed for trading on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. NYSE Arca, Inc. and Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. are referred to individually as an "Exchange" and together as the "Exchanges". The market price for a share of each Fund may be different from a Fund's most recent net asset value (“NAV”). ETFs are funds that trade like other publicly traded securities. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought and redeemed from the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on NAV, shares of the Funds may be purchased or redeemed directly from the Funds at NAV solely by Authorized Participants. Also, unlike shares of a mutual fund, shares of the Funds are listed on an Exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day.

Dividend Select ETF. In selecting securities for the Fund, the Fund’s sub-advisor, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (“Fort Washington”), seeks to invest in companies that:
Have historically paid consistent, growing dividends;
Have sustainable competitive advantages that should result in excess profits to support future dividend payments; and
Trade at reasonable valuations compared to their intrinsic value

For purposes of the Fund, historical dividend payout and growth generally focuses on companies that tend to have at least a three-year track record of consistent dividend growth; however, many of the Fund's portfolio companies have historical track records of growing their dividend annually beyond three years.

The Sub-Advisor believes its unique approach results in a portfolio of high quality companies with sustainable competitive advantages that should pay reliable, growing dividends at reasonable valuations. Fort Washington evaluates a company’s competitive advantage by assessing its barrier(s) to entry. The barrier(s) to entry can be created through a cost advantage, economies of scale, high customer loyalty, or a government barrier (e.g., license or subsidy). Fort Washington believes that the strongest barrier to entry is the combination of economies of scale and higher customer loyalty.

Fort Washington believes that a key determinant of whether or not a company has a competitive advantage is its return on capital. For example, Fort Washington believes that if a company has a competitive advantage, this is often evidenced by its historical returns on capital exceeding its cost of capital. Knowing this, if a company has a competitive advantage, Fort Washington would expect returns on capital to exceed the cost of capital. This excess profit is then available to support future dividend payments. Fort Washington also assesses the amount of dividends paid relative to a company’s operating profit, and how that might change in different operating environments. As such, key metrics to assess whether a corporate competitive advantage should result in excess profits to support future dividend growth are historical excess returns on capital and low payout ratios.

Fort Washington believes the strength of a company’s competitive advantage can be assessed through various metrics such as: market share stability, returns on capital, pricing power, return stability, dominant competitors, and failed entry. Regarding valuations, Fort Washington assesses valuation through internal analysis and leveraging of third-party data. Fort Washington’s approach to valuation focuses on reliability classes where a company’s return on capital is a key input to assessing valuation. Fort Washington believes reasonable valuations are those where a company is trading below or near fair value and seeks to avoid companies that are trading well above Fort Washington’s assessment of fair value.

The Fund will generally hold 40 to 55 companies, with residual cash and cash equivalents expected to represent less than 10% of the Fund’s net assets. The Fund may, at times, hold fewer securities and a higher percentage of cash and cash equivalents when, among other reasons, Fort Washington cannot find a sufficient number of securities that meets its purchase requirements.

The Fund’s portfolio is typically repositioned by Fort Washington monthly.

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The Fund will generally sell a security if the security does not meet portfolio guidelines, if the security stops paying a dividend and future prospects of paying a dividend are limited, or if better opportunities exist based on the fundamentals and valuation of the business.

Strategic Income Opportunities ETF. The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in income producing fixed-income securities. Income producing securities generally include corporate debt securities, mortgage-related securities, asset-backed securities, government securities (both U.S. government securities and foreign sovereign debt), and preferred stocks.

The Fund’s sub-advisor, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (“Fort Washington”), seeks to employ a high conviction, yield-oriented investment approach with a relatively focused number of issuers, coupled with sector diversification and diligent risk management that is intended to result in attractive risk-adjusted returns via high levels of income. In selecting individual securities for the Fund, Fort Washington applies a rigorous bottom-up security selection process. A key characteristic of this process is the identification and implementation of high conviction ideas that can result in meaningful alpha generation. Fort Washington utilizes a variety of proprietary tools to assist with security screening and analysis. The Fund seeks to incorporate the best investment ideas available to Fort Washington, utilizing Fort Washington’s core competencies of bottom-up credit and structure analysis. The portfolio management team believes risk monitoring, performance measurement, and active management are key components to achieving attractive risk-adjusted returns.

A starting point for Fort Washington's identification of attractive opportunities is the quantification of return potential along with associated risk. Fort Washington seeks to identify opportunities with the highest level of expected return relative to the risk. Fort Washington quantifies risk as downside risk (i.e., what can happen in a recession), not volatility. The quantification of risk and reward are an important part of the investment process that is combined with the company specific credit analysis.

In building the Fund’s portfolio, Fort Washington invests at least 50% of the Fund's portfolio in investment-grade rated debt securities. The Fund may also invest up to 50% of the Fund's portfolio in non-investment-grade debt securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities are often referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative. The Fund's investment policies are based on credit ratings at the time of purchase. The proportion of non-investment grade debt is influenced by the top-down component of the Sub-Advisor’s investment process that assesses the current macro environment focusing on trends in the global economy, financial conditions, sentiment, and valuation. Generally, the exposure to non-investment grade debt increases when credit spreads are wide, taking account of economic growth, financial conditions, and sentiment. Once the targets for macro risks are determined, the Fund’s portfolio managers and research teams analyze the individual sectors on a risk-adjusted basis using proprietary tools, including qualitative and quantitative methods. Analysis is performed to determine a sector’s potential excess return compared to the downside risk in a stress scenario. This allows the Sub-Advisor to compare sectors with different characteristics using a consistent methodology.

With respect to the criteria used to select from among the asset- and mortgage-backed securities available, the Sub-Advisor believes in-depth specialization is critical to valuing structured products and maximizing returns. These securities tend to have more complex and uncertain cash flows, offering the potential for more inefficient markets. To capitalize on this inefficiency, the Sub-Advisor’s asset specialists apply a rigorous and quantitative valuation process to each potential holding, utilizing both proprietary models and third-party systems to evaluate the complexities of collateral, structure, credit, relative value, and econometric modeling. This process involves a loan-level analysis of the underlying collateral, followed by a robust analysis of the security’s cash flow structure. As a result of this analysis, the Sub-Advisor’s asset specialists are able to identify securities that they believe have the most attractive risk and return characteristics.

The Fund may also invest up to 20% of its total assets in income producing fixed-income securities that are emerging markets debt securities denominated in either the U.S. dollar or a foreign currency. Within the emerging markets debt (or “EMD”) sleeve of the Fund's portfolio, there is no specific geographic limit or focus. Fort Washington’s EMD research and screening process begins with assessing global market and economic conditions and their impact on emerging market fixed income assets. This assessment provides context for Fort Washington’s views on individual credits, and helps drive portfolio positioning and risk parameters. A bottom up approach is utilized in analyzing individual sovereign issuers applying both qualitative and quantitative methods. Fort Washington starts with a fundamental base assessment of the country, evaluating economic resiliency as well as the strength of fiscal and external accounts. Fort Washington then builds on the fundamental base assessment by evaluating the impact of government policy on credit quality going forward. The investment process analyzes multiple policy areas, ranging from those that directly shape country fundamentals such as structural economic reforms and fiscal frameworks, to international relations and potential impacts on policy continuity from upcoming elections.

Additionally, in order to implement its investment strategy, the Fund may invest in mortgage dollar-roll transactions, reverse repurchase agreements, and other derivatives, including forwards, futures contracts, interest rate and credit default swap
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agreements, and options. These investments may be used to gain or hedge market exposure, to adjust the Fund’s duration, to manage interest rate risk, and for any other purposes consistent with the Fund’s investment strategies and limitations. The use of derivatives in the Fund’s portfolio allows the Sub-Advisor to hedge risks and/or express views in the portfolio that may not be possible given availability of cash or securities to buy/sell. Fort Washington believes that the use of derivatives increases the flexibility of the strategy to react swiftly to changes in market conditions and adds another method to add value and diversify Fund returns over time.

Although not expected to be a principal investment strategy, the Fund may also invest up to 20% of its assets in public equities and may also invest in other ETFs.

The Fund will generally sell a security if the price/yield no longer adequately compensates for the risk profile or if there is a change to allocation between sectors based on relative value.

US Large Cap Focused ETF . The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in U.S.-listed large capitalization equity securities. For the purpose of the Fund's 80% policy, a large capitalization company has a market capitalization, at the time of purchase, above $5 billion. For purposes of the Fund's principal investment strategy, equity securities generally include common stocks; however, the Fund may also invest to a lesser extent in preferred stocks. These securities may be listed on an exchange or traded over-the-counter.

In selecting securities for the Fund, the Fund’s sub-advisor, Fort Washington, seeks to invest in companies that:

Are trading below its estimate of the companies’ intrinsic value; and
Have a sustainable competitive advantage in place. Fort Washington evaluates a company’s competitive advantage by assessing its barrier(s) to entry. A company's barrier(s) to entry can be created through a cost advantage, economies of scale, high customer loyalty, or a government barrier (e.g., license or subsidy). Fort Washington believes that the strongest barrier to entry is the combination of economies of scale and higher customer loyalty.

The Fund is non-diversified and, therefore may, from time to time, have significant exposure to a limited number of issuers. The Fund will generally hold 25 to 45 companies, with residual cash and cash equivalents expected to represent less than 10% of the Fund’s net assets. The Fund may, at times, hold fewer securities and a higher percentage of cash and cash equivalents when, among other reasons, Fort Washington cannot find a sufficient number of securities that meets its purchase requirements. Although the Fund may invest in any economic sector, at times it may emphasize one or more particular sectors.

The Fund will generally sell a security if it reaches Fort Washington’s estimate of fair value, if a more attractive investment opportunity is available, or if a structural change has taken place and Fort Washington cannot reliably estimate the impact of the change on the business fundamentals.

The Fund is restricted from investing in securities of foreign issuers, including through the use of ordinary shares or depositary receipts such as American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”). This restriction is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by the Fund's Board upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders.

Ultra Short Income ETF . The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, at least 80% of its assets in fixed-income securities. This is a non-fundamental investment policy that can be changed by the Fund's Board upon 60 days’ prior notice to shareholders. The Fund invests in a diversified portfolio of securities of different maturities, including U.S. Treasury securities, U.S. government agency securities, securities of U.S. government-sponsored enterprises, corporate bonds (including those of foreign issuers), mortgage-backed securities, commercial mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, municipal bonds, collateralized loan obligations and cash equivalent securities including repurchase agreements, commercial paper and variable rate demand notes. The Fund invests primarily in U.S. fixed-income securities, but may invest to a lesser extent in U.S. dollar-dominated foreign securities generally in the form of corporate bonds of foreign issuers.

The Fund invests primarily in investment-grade debt securities. Investment-grade debt securities are those having a rating of BBB-/Baa3 or higher from a nationally recognized statistical rating organization ("NRSRO") or, if a rating is not available, deemed to be of comparable quality by the sub-advisor, Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. ("Fort Washington"). The Fund's investment policies are based on credit ratings at the time of purchase. The Fund can also invest up to 15% of its net assets in non-investment-grade debt securities. Non-investment-grade debt securities are often referred to as "junk bonds" and are considered speculative.

The Fund’s strategy places a greater emphasis on fixed-income securities that are structured products, and therefore the Fund expects to maintain a greater exposure to the structured products sectors (i.e., mortgage-backed securities, commercial
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mortgage-backed securities, asset-backed securities, and collateralized loan obligations) than other types of fixed-income securities. Generally, total structured product exposure is expected to be approximately 50-70% of the Fund’s overall portfolio, although it may fall outside that range from time to time.

Fort Washington also expects to maintain a meaningful exposure to corporate credit, which generally is not expected to represent less than 20% of the Fund’s portfolio. The remainder of Fund assets are expected to be invested in other sectors, which may include municipal bonds, U.S. Treasuries, and various types of cash-equivalent securities.

Fort Washington maintains strategic (long-term) and tactical (short-term) allocation ranges for each of these sectors, which may be revised over time based on Fort Washington’s assessment of risk and return across sectors, in conjunction with the market outlook and desired risk positioning of the Fund. Bottom-up security selection is executed by sector specialists within the parameters of the targeted sector allocations and desired risk positioning.

Securities within each subsector may serve a variety of purposes within the Fund, including contributing high credit quality exposure (across any sector), providing liquidity (cash equivalents or short, high quality securities), providing near-term cashflow for reinvestment or liquidity purposes (amortizing securities, or securities with short-dated maturities), providing attractive yield for a given risk profile (across any sector), or contributing toward the targeted duration positioning (any sector), among other things. These attributes are not mutually exclusive, and Fort Washington’s security-level selection process is intended to optimize the benefit and/or positioning gained from each security in the portfolio, within the overall sector allocation and risk budgeting framework.

Fort Washington’s targeted sector and risk positioning for the Fund will vary in different types of market conditions. For example, during periods of elevated market uncertainty or increased redemption activity, Fort Washington may seek to increase liquidity in the Fund via higher exposure to cash-equivalents, Treasuries, or other short duration, high quality securities. During periods of a compressed credit curve (relatively flat credit spreads across the credit spectrum) the Sub-Advisor may seek to reduce exposure to securities with higher risk profiles or lower credit ratings, which may represent a reduction in those types of securities across any structured product or corporate sector. Fort Washington may also seek to increase or reduce exposure to specific sectors based on relevant fundamental or economic views—either favorable or unfavorable. Sector and risk targets will vary depending on myriad factors, and the Sub-Advisor seeks to execute security selection in such a manner as to optimize positioning relative to the target at any given time.

In selecting investments for the Fund, Fort Washington chooses fixed-income securities that it believes are attractively priced relative to the market or to similar instruments. Fort Washington is continually assessing the risk and return profile available in the market across a broad range of sectors and security types. An investment may be determined to be “attractively priced” if it is offered at a level that is expected to yield a return greater than it historically has and/or a greater return than generally available in the market for other securities of a similar risk profile (i.e., similar credit quality, duration, liquidity and expected volatility). This comparison is made not only to securities within the same sector, but also across all relevant, investible sectors available to the Fund .

In addition, Fort Washington considers the “effective duration” of the Fund’s entire portfolio. Effective duration is a measure of a security’s price volatility or the risk associated with changes in interest rates. While the Fund may invest in securities with any maturity or duration, Fort Washington seeks to maintain an effective duration for the Fund of one year or less under normal market conditions.

Can a Fund Depart From its Principal Investment Strategies?
 
In addition to the investments and strategies described in this prospectus, each Fund may invest in other securities, use other strategies and engage in other investment practices. These permitted investments and strategies are described in detail in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).

Each Fund’s investment goal is non-fundamental and may be changed by the Board of Trustees (the “Board”) without shareholder approval.  Shareholders will be notified at least 60 days before any change takes effect.
 
The investments and strategies described throughout this prospectus are those that the Funds use under normal circumstances. During unusual economic or market conditions, or for temporary defensive purposes, each Fund may invest up to 100% of its assets in cash, repurchase agreements, and short-term obligations (i.e., fixed and variable rate securities and high quality debt securities of corporate and government issuers) that would not ordinarily be consistent with each Fund's investment strategy. This defensive investing may increase a Fund’s taxable income, and when a Fund is invested defensively, it may not
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achieve its investment goal. A Fund will do so only if the Fund’s sub-advisor believes that the risk of loss in using the Fund’s normal strategies and investments outweighs the opportunity for gains. Of course, there can be no guarantee that any Fund will achieve its investment goal.

80% Investment Policy. Each Fund has adopted a policy to invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the value of its “assets” in certain types of investments suggested by its name (the “80% Policy”). For purposes of this 80% Policy, the term “assets” means net assets plus the amount of borrowings for investment purposes. Each Fund must comply with its 80% Policy at the time the Fund invests its assets. Accordingly, when a Fund no longer meets the 80% requirement as a result of circumstances beyond its control, such as changes in the value of portfolio holdings, it would not have to sell its holdings but would have to make any new investments in such a way as to comply with the 80% Policy. This policy may be changed by the Board without shareholder approval. Shareholders will be notified at least 60 days' before any change in a Fund's 80% Policy takes effect.

Other Investment Companies.  A Fund may invest in securities issued by other investment companies to the extent permitted by the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the "1940 Act") the rules thereunder and applicable Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) staff interpretations thereof, or applicable exemptive relief granted by the SEC.
 
Lending of Portfolio Securities. The Funds may lend their portfolio securities to brokers, dealers, and financial institutions under guidelines adopted by the Board, including a requirement that a Fund must receive collateral equal to no less than 100% of the market value of the securities loaned. The risk in lending portfolio securities, as with other extensions of credit, consists of possible loss of rights in the collateral should the borrower fail financially. In determining whether to lend securities, the Advisor will consider all relevant facts and circumstances, including the creditworthiness of the borrower. More information on securities lending is available in the SAI.
What are the Principal Risks of Investing in the Funds?
 
The risks that may apply to your investment in a Fund are listed below in a table of principal risks followed by a description of each risk. Unless otherwise noted, in this section, references to a single Fund apply equally to all of the Funds. Further information about investment strategies and risks is available in the Funds’ SAI:
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Dividend Select ETF Strategic Income Opportunities ETF US Large Cap Focused ETF Ultra Short Income ETF
Asset-Backed Securities Risk X X
Authorized Participants Concentration Risk X X X X
Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk X
Counterparty Risk X X
Credit Risk X X
Derivatives Risk X
Dividend Risk X
Economic and Market Events Risk X X X X
Emerging Markets Risk X
Equity Securities Risk X X X
Fixed-Income Risk X X
ETF Risk X X X X
Foreign Securities Risk X X
Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contract Risk X
Futures Contracts Risk X
Interest Rate Risk X X
Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk X X
Large-Cap Risk X X
Leverage Risk X
Management Risk X X X X
Mid-Cap Risk X
Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk X X
Mortgage Dollar Roll Risk X
Municipal Securities Risk X
Non-Diversification Risk X
Non-Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk X X
Options Risk X
Portfolio Turnover Risk X X X
Preferred Stock Risk X X
Premium/Discount Risk X X X X
Prepayment Risk X X
Repurchase Agreement Risk X X
Secondary Market Trading Risk X X X X
Sector Focus Risk X
Sovereign Debt Risk X
Swap Agreement Risk X
U.S. Government Securities Risk X X
Value Investing Risk X

Collateralized Loan Obligations Risk:  A collateralized loan obligation is a type of asset-backed security that is an obligation of a trust typically collateralized by pools of loans, which may include domestic and foreign senior secured and unsecured loans and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade, or equivalent unrated loans.  The cash flows from the trust are split into two or more portions, called tranches, which vary in risk and yield. The riskier portion is the residual, or “equity,” tranche, which bears some or all of the risk of default by the loans in the trust. The risks of an investment in a CLO largely depend on the type of underlying collateral securities and the tranche in which an underlying fund invests. Typically, CLOs are privately offered and sold, and thus are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, an underlying fund may in certain circumstances characterize its investments in CLOs as illiquid.  In assessing liquidity, an underlying fund will consider various factors including whether the CLO may be purchased and sold in Rule 144A transactions
27


and whether an active dealer market exists.  CLOs are subject to the typical risks associated with debt instruments (i.e., interest rate risk and credit risk). Additional risks of CLOs include the possibility that distributions from collateral securities will be insufficient to make interest or other payments, the potential for a decline in the quality of the collateral, and the possibility that an underlying fund may invest in a subordinate tranche of a CLO. In addition, due to the complex nature of a CLO, an investment in a CLO may not perform as expected. An investment in a CLO also is subject to the risk that the issuer and the investors may interpret the terms of the instrument differently, giving rise to disputes.

Counterparty Risk: The issuer or guarantor of a fixed-income security, a counterparty (the other party to a transaction or an agreement ) to a transaction with the Fund, or a borrower of the Fund's securities may be unable or unwilling to make timely principal, interest or settlement payments, or otherwise honor its obligations.

Derivatives Risk: The use of derivatives may expose the Fund to additional risks that it would not be subject to if it invested directly in the securities underlying those derivatives. Risks associated with derivatives may include correlation risk, which is the risk that the derivative does not correlate well with the security, index, or currency to which it relates. Other risks include liquidity risk, which is the risk that the Fund may be unable to sell or close out the derivative due to an illiquid market, counterparty risk, which is the risk that the counterparty to a derivative instrument may be unwilling or unable to make required payments or otherwise meet its obligations, and leverage risk, which is the risk that a derivative could expose the Fund to magnified losses resulting from leverage. The use of derivatives for hedging purposes may result in losses that partially or completely offset gains in portfolio positions. Using derivatives can increase the volatility of the Fund’s share price. For some derivatives, it is possible for the Fund to lose more than the amount invested in the derivative instrument. Derivatives may, for federal income tax purposes, affect the character of gain and loss realized by the Fund, accelerate recognition of income to the Fund, affect the holding periods for certain of the Fund’s assets and defer recognition of certain of the Fund’s losses. The Fund’s ability to invest in derivatives may be restricted by certain provisions of the federal income tax laws relating to the Fund’s qualification as a regulated investment company (“RIC”). These additional risks could cause the Fund to experience losses to which it would otherwise not be subject. Regulatory changes in derivatives markets could impact the cost of or the Fund's ability to engage in derivative transactions.

In addition, new Rule 18f-4 (the “Derivatives Rule”), adopted by the SEC on October 28, 2020, replaces the asset segregation regime of Investment Company Act Release No. 10666 (Release 10666) with a new framework for the use of derivatives by registered funds. For funds using a significant amount of derivatives, the Derivatives Rule mandates a fund adopt and/or implement: (i) value at risk limitations in lieu of asset segregation requirements; (ii) a written derivatives risk management program; (iii) new Board oversight responsibilities; and (iv) new reporting and recordkeeping requirements. The Derivative Rule provides an exception for funds with derivative exposure not exceeding 10% of its net assets, excluding certain currency and interest rate hedging transactions. In addition, the Derivatives Rule provides special treatment for reverse repurchase agreements and similar financing transactions and unfunded commitment agreements. Funds will be required to comply with the Derivatives Rule starting on August 19, 2022. Each Fund is expected to fit within the exception to the Derivatives Rule for funds with derivative exposure not exceeding 10% of its net assets. As a result, the Derivatives Rule is not expected to have a material impact on the Funds.
 
Forward Foreign Currency Exchange Contract Risk: A forward foreign currency exchange contract is an agreement to buy or sell a specific currency at a future date and at a price set at the time of the contract. Forward foreign currency exchange contracts may reduce the risk of loss from a change in value of a currency, but they also limit any potential gains and do not protect against fluctuations in the value of the underlying position and are subject to counterparty risk. The forecasting of currency market movement is extremely difficult, and whether any hedging strategy will be successful is highly uncertain. Moreover, it is impossible to forecast with precision the market value of portfolio securities at the expiration of a forward foreign currency contract. Accordingly, a Fund may be required to buy or sell additional currency on the spot market (and bear the expense of such transaction) if the sub-advisor’s predictions regarding the movement of foreign currency or securities markets prove inaccurate. Because foreign currency forward contracts are privately negotiated transactions, there can be no assurance that a Fund will have flexibility to rollover a forward foreign currency contract upon its expiration if it desires to do so. Additionally, there can be no assurance that the other party to the contract will perform its services under the contract.
 
Futures Contracts Risk: Futures contracts provide for the future sale by one party and purchase by another party of a specified amount of a specific security at a specified future time and at a specified price. An option on a futures contract gives the purchaser the right, in exchange for a premium, to assume a position in a futures contract at a specified exercise price during the term of the option. There are risks associated with these activities, including the following: (1) the success of a hedging strategy may depend on an ability to predict movements in the prices of individual securities, fluctuations in markets and movements in interest rates; (2) there may be an imperfect or no correlation between the changes in market
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value of the securities held by a Fund and the prices of futures and options on futures; (3) there may not be a liquid secondary market for a futures contract or option; (4) trading restrictions or limitations may be imposed by an exchange; and (5) government regulations may restrict trading in futures contracts and futures options.
 
Leverage Risk: Leverage occurs when a Fund uses derivatives or similar instruments or techniques to gain exposure to investments in an amount that exceeds a Fund’s initial investment. The use of leverage magnifies changes in a Fund’s net asset value and thus results in increased portfolio volatility and increased risk of loss. Leverage can also create an interest expense that may lower a Fund’s overall returns. There can be no guarantee that a Fund's use of a leveraging strategy will be successful.

Options Risk: Options trading is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. The value of options can be highly volatile, and their use can result in loss if the Sub-Advisor is incorrect in its expectation of price fluctuations. The successful use of options for hedging purposes also depends in part on the ability of the Sub-Advisor to predict future price fluctuations and the degree of correlation between the options and securities markets. When options are purchased over the counter, the Fund bears counterparty risk, which is the risk that the counterparty that wrote the option will be unable or unwilling to perform its obligations under the option contract. Such options may also be illiquid, and in such cases, the Fund may have difficulty closing out its position.

Swap Agreements Risk: Swap agreements (“swaps”) are individually negotiated and structured to include exposure to a variety of different types of investments or market factors, such as interest rates, foreign currency rates, mortgage securities, corporate borrowing rates, security prices, indexes or inflation rates. Swaps may increase or decrease the overall volatility of the investments of the Fund and its share price. The performance of swaps may be affected by a change in the specific interest rate, currency, or other factors that determine the amounts of payments due to and from the Fund. If a swap calls for payments by the Fund, the Fund must be prepared to make such payments when due. Additionally, if the counterparty’s creditworthiness declines, the value of a swap may decline. If the counterparty is unable to meet its obligations under the contract, declares bankruptcy, defaults, or becomes insolvent, the Fund may not be able to recoup the money it expected to receive under the contract. Finally, a swap can be a form of leverage, which can magnify the Fund’s gains or losses.

Dividend Risk: Dividends the Fund receives on common stocks are not fixed but are declared at the discretion of an issuer’s board of directors. There is no guarantee that the companies in which the Fund invests will declare dividends in the future or that dividends, if declared, will remain at current levels or increase over time. Securities that pay dividends may be sensitive to changes in interest rates, and as interest rates rise, or fall, the prices of such securities may fall. A sharp rise in interest rates, or other market downturn, could result in a decision to decrease or eliminate a dividend.

Economic and Market Events Risk: Events in certain sectors historically have resulted, and may in the future result, in an unusually high degree of volatility in the financial markets, both domestic and foreign. These events have included, but are not limited to: bankruptcies, corporate restructurings, and other similar events; governmental efforts to limit short selling and high frequency trading; measures to address U.S. federal and state budget deficits; social, political, and economic instability in Europe; economic stimulus by the Japanese central bank; dramatic changes in energy prices and currency exchange rates; and China’s economic slowdown. Interconnected global economies and financial markets increase the possibility that conditions in one country or region might adversely impact issuers in a different country or region. Both domestic and foreign equity markets have experienced increased volatility and turmoil, with issuers that have exposure to the real estate, mortgage, and credit markets particularly affected. Financial institutions could suffer losses as interest rates rise or economic conditions deteriorate.

In addition, relatively high market volatility and reduced liquidity in credit and fixed-income markets may negatively affect many issuers worldwide. Actions taken by the U.S. Federal Reserve (“Fed”) or foreign central banks to stimulate or stabilize economic growth, such as interventions in currency markets, could cause high volatility in the equity and fixed-income markets. Reduced liquidity may result in less money being available to purchase raw materials, goods, and services from emerging markets, which may, in turn, bring down the prices of these economic staples. It may also result in emerging-market issuers having more difficulty obtaining financing, which may, in turn, cause a decline in their securities prices.
In addition, while interest rates have been historically low in recent years in the United States and abroad, any decision by the Fed to adjust the target fed funds rate, among other factors, could cause markets to experience continuing high volatility. A significant increase in interest rates may cause a decline in the market for equity securities. Also, regulators have expressed concern that rate increases may contribute to price volatility. These events and the possible resulting market volatility may have an adverse effect on the Fund.
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Political turmoil within the United States and abroad may also impact the Fund. Although the U.S. government has honored its credit obligations, it remains possible that the United States could default on its obligations. While it is impossible to predict the consequences of such an unprecedented event, it is likely that a default by the United States would be highly disruptive to the U.S. and global securities markets and could significantly impair the value of the Fund’s investments. Similarly, political events within the United States at times have resulted, and may in the future result, in a shutdown of government services, which could negatively affect the U.S. economy, decrease the value of many Fund investments, and increase uncertainty in or impair the operation of the U.S. or other securities markets. The U.S. is also considering significant new investments in infrastructure which, coupled with lower federal taxes, could lead to increased government borrowing and higher interest rates. While these proposed policies are going through the political process, the equity and debt markets may react strongly to expectations, which could increase volatility, especially if the market’s expectations for changes in government policies are not borne out. In recent years, the U.S. renegotiated many of its global trade relationships and has imposed or threatened to impose significant import tariffs. These actions could lead to price volatility and overall declines in U.S. and global investment markets.

Uncertainties surrounding the sovereign debt of a number of European Union (EU) countries and the viability of the EU have disrupted and may in the future disrupt markets in the United States and around the world. If one or more countries leave the EU or the EU dissolves, the world’s securities markets likely will be significantly disrupted. On January 31, 2020, the United Kingdom (UK) left the EU, commonly referred to as “Brexit,” and the UK ceased to be a member of the EU. Following a transition period during which the EU and the UK Government engaged in a series of negotiations regarding the terms of the UK’s future relationship with the EU, the EU and UK Government signed an agreement on December 30, 2020 regarding the economic relationship between the UK and the EU. This agreement became effective on a provisional basis on January 1, 2021 and formally entered into force on May 1, 2021. While the full impact of Brexit is unknown, Brexit has already resulted in volatility in European and global markets. There remains significant market uncertainty regarding Brexit’s ramifications, and the range and potential implications of possible political, regulatory, economic, and market outcomes are difficult to predict. This uncertainty may affect other countries in the EU and elsewhere, and may cause volatility within the EU, triggering prolonged economic downturns in certain countries within the EU. Despite the influence of the lockdowns, and the economic bounce back, Brexit has had a material impact on the UK's economy. Additionally, trade between the UK and the EU did not benefit from the global rebound in trade in 2021, and remained at the very low levels experienced at the start of the coronavirus (“COVID-19”) pandemic in 2020, highlighting Brexit's potential long-term effects on the UK economy.

In addition, Brexit may create additional and substantial economic stresses for the UK, including a contraction of the UK economy and price volatility in UK stocks, decreased trade, capital outflows, devaluation of the British pound, wider corporate bond spreads due to uncertainty and declines in business and consumer spending as well as foreign direct investment. Brexit may also adversely affect UK-based financial firms that have counterparties in the EU or participate in market infrastructure (trading venues, clearing houses, settlement facilities) based in the EU. Additionally, the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic is likely to continue to stretch the resources and deficits of many countries in the EU and throughout the world, increasing the possibility that countries may be unable to make timely payments on their sovereign debt. These events and the resulting market volatility may have an adverse effect on the performance of the Fund.

An epidemic outbreak and governments’ reactions to such an outbreak could cause uncertainty in the markets and may adversely affect the performance of the global economy. An outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a coronavirus was first detected in China in late 2019 and subsequently spread globally. This coronavirus resulted in closing borders, enhanced health screenings, disruptions to healthcare service preparation and delivery, quarantines, cancellations, and disruptions to supply chains and consumer activity, as well as general concern and uncertainty. The impact of this coronavirus may last for an extended period of time and has resulted in substantial economic volatility. Health crises caused by outbreaks, such as the coronavirus outbreak, may exacerbate other pre-existing political, social and economic risks. The impact of this outbreak, and other epidemics and pandemics that may arise in the future, could continue to negatively affect the worldwide economy, as well as the economies of individual countries, individual companies, including certain Fund service providers and issuers of the Fund's investments and the market in general in significant and unforeseen ways. Any such impact could adversely affect the Fund’s performance, the performance of the securities in which the Fund invests and may lead to losses on your investment in the Fund.

The United States responded to the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting economic distress with fiscal and monetary stimulus packages. In late March 2020, the government passed the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”), a stimulus package providing for over $2.2 trillion in resources to small businesses, state and local governments, and individuals adversely impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. In late December 2020, the government also passed a spending bill that included $900 billion in stimulus relief for the COVID-19 pandemic. Further, in March 2021, the government passed the American Rescue Plan Act of 2021, a $1.9 trillion stimulus bill to accelerate the United States’ recovery from the economic and health effects of the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, in mid-March 2020 the U.S. Federal Reserve (“Fed”) cut interest rates to historically low levels and promised unlimited and open-ended quantitative easing, including purchases of corporate
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and municipal government bonds. The Fed also enacted various programs to support liquidity operations and funding in the financial markets, including expanding its reverse repurchase agreement operations, adding $1.5 trillion of liquidity to the banking system; establishing swap lines with other major central banks to provide dollar funding; establishing a program to support money market funds; easing various bank capital buffers; providing funding backstops for businesses to provide bridging loans for up to four years; and providing funding to help credit flow in asset-backed securities markets. The Fed also extended credit to small- and medium-sized businesses.

To the extend the Fed “tapers” or reduces the amount of securities it purchases pursuant to quantitative easing, and/or raises the federal funds rate, there is a risk that interest rates will rise, which could expose fixed-income and related markets to heightened volatility and could cause the value of a Fund's investments, and the Fund's NAV, to decline, potentially suddenly and significantly. As a result, the Fund may experience high redemptions and, as a result, increased portfolio turnover, which could increase the costs that the Fund incurs and may negatively impact the Fund's performance.

Political and military events, including in North Korea, Venezuela, Russia, Ukraine, Iran, Syria, and other areas of the Middle East, and nationalist unrest in Europe and South America, also may cause market disruptions. As a result of continued political tensions and armed conflicts, including the Russian invasion of Ukraine commencing in February of 2022, the extent and ultimate result of which are unknown at this time, the United States and the EU, along with the regulatory bodies of a number of countries, have imposed economic sanctions on certain Russian corporate entities and individuals, and certain sectors of Russia’s economy, which may result in, among other things, the continued devaluation of Russian currency, a downgrade in the country’s credit rating, and/or a decline in the value and liquidity of Russian securities, property or interests. These sanctions could also result in the immediate freeze of Russian securities and/or funds invested in prohibited assets, impairing the ability of a fund to buy, sell, receive or deliver those securities and/or assets. These sanctions or the threat of additional sanctions could also result in Russia taking counter measures or retaliatory actions, which may further impair the value and liquidity of Russian securities. The United States and other nations or international organizations may also impose additional economic sanctions or take other actions that may adversely affect Russia exposed issuers and companies in various sectors of the Russian economy. Any or all of these potential results could lead Russia’s economy into a recession. Economic sanctions and other actions against Russian institutions, companies, and individuals resulting from the ongoing conflict may also have a substantial negative impact on other economies and securities markets both regionally and globally, as well as on companies with operations in the conflict region, the extent to which is unknown at this time. The United States and the EU have also imposed similar sanctions on Belarus for its support of Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. Additional sanctions may be imposed on Belarus and other countries that support Russia. Any such sanctions could present substantially similar risks as those resulting from the sanctions imposed on Russia, including substantial negative impacts on the regional and global economies and securities markets.

In addition, there is a risk that the prices of goods and services in the United States and many foreign economies may decline over time, known as deflation. Deflation may have an adverse effect on stock prices and creditworthiness and may make defaults on debt more likely. If a country’s economy slips into a deflationary pattern, it could last for a prolonged period and may be difficult to reverse. Further, there is a risk that the present value of assets or income from investments will be less in the future, known as inflation. Inflation rates may change frequently and drastically as a result of various factors, including unexpected shifts in the domestic or global economy, and a Fund’s investments may be affected, which may reduce a Fund's performance. Further, inflation may lead to the rise in interest rates, which may negatively affect the value of debt instruments held by the Fund, resulting in a negative impact on a Fund's performance. Generally, securities issued in emerging markets are subject to a greater risk of inflationary or deflationary forces, and more developed markets are better able to use monetary policy to normalize markets.

In addition, with the increased use of technologies, such as mobile devices and "cloud"-based service offerings and the dependence on the Internet and computer systems to perform necessary business functions, the Funds' service providers are susceptible to operational and information or cyber security risks that could result in losses to a Fund and its shareholders. Cyber security breaches are either intentional or unintentional events that allow an unauthorized party to gain access to Fund assets, customer data, or proprietary information, or cause a Fund or Fund service provider to suffer data corruption or lose operational functionality. Intentional cyber security incidents include: unauthorized access to systems, networks, or devices (such as through “hacking” activity or "phishing"); infection from computer viruses or other malicious software code; and attacks that shut down, disable, slow, or otherwise disrupt operations, business processes, or website access or functionality. Cyber-attacks can also be carried out in a manner that does not require gaining unauthorized access, such as causing denial-of-service attacks on the service providers' systems or websites rendering them unavailable to intended users or via "ransomware" that renders the systems inoperable until appropriate actions are taken. In addition, unintentional incidents can occur, such as the inadvertent release of confidential information (possibly resulting in the violation of applicable privacy laws).

A cyber security breach could result in the loss or theft of customer data or funds, loss or theft of proprietary information or corporate data, physical damage to a computer or network system, or costs associated with system repairs, any of which could
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have a substantial impact on a Fund. For example, in a denial of service, Fund shareholders could lose access to their electronic accounts indefinitely, and employees of the Advisor, a Sub-Advisor, or the Funds’ other service providers may not be able to access electronic systems to perform critical duties for the Funds, such as trading, NAV calculation, shareholder accounting, or fulfillment of Fund share purchases and redemptions. Cyber security incidents could cause a Fund, the Advisor, a Sub-Advisor, or other service provider to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, compliance costs associated with corrective measures, litigation costs, or financial loss. They may also result in violations of applicable privacy and other laws. In addition, such incidents could affect issuers in which a Fund invests, thereby causing the Fund’s investments to lose value.

Cyber-events have the potential to materially affect the Funds', the Advisor and the sub-advisor’s relationships with accounts, shareholders, clients, customers, employees, products, and service providers. The Funds have established risk management systems reasonably designed to seek to reduce the risks associated with cyber-events. There is no guarantee that the Funds will be able to prevent or mitigate the impact of any or all cyber-events.

The Funds are exposed to operational risk arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Funds’ service providers, counterparties, or other third parties, failed or inadequate processes, and technology or system failures.

The Advisor, Sub-Advisor, and their affiliates have established risk management systems that seek to reduce cybersecurity and operational risks, and business continuity plans in the event of a cybersecurity breach or operational failure. However, there are inherent limitations in such plans, including that certain risks have not been identified, and there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed, especially since none of the Advisor, a Sub-Advisor, or their affiliates controls the cybersecurity or operations systems of the Funds’ third party service providers (including the Funds’ custodian), or those of the issuers of securities in which the Funds invest.

In addition, other disruptive events, including (but not limited to) natural disasters and public health crises (such as the COVID-19 pandemic), may adversely affect a Fund’s ability to conduct business, in particular if the Fund’s employees or the employees of its service providers are unable or unwilling to perform their responsibilities as a result of any such event. Even if the Fund’s employees and the employees of its service providers are able to work remotely, those remote work arrangements could result in the Fund’s business operations being less efficient than under normal circumstances, could lead to delays in its processing of transactions, and could increase the risk of cyber-events.

ETF Risk: As an ETF, each Fund is subject to the following risks:

Authorized Participants Concentration Risk: The Fund has a limited number of financial institutions that may act as Authorized Participants (“APs”), which are responsible for the creation and redemption activity for the Fund. To the extent APs exit the business, become unable or are otherwise unwilling to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund and no other AP steps in to create or redeem, Fund shares may trade at a material discount to net asset value (“NAV”) and possibly face delisting.

Premium/Discount Risk: As with all ETFs, Fund shares may only be bought and sold in the secondary market at market prices. The NAV of the Fund’s shares will generally fluctuate with changes in the market value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings. The trading prices of Fund shares in the secondary market will generally fluctuate in accordance with changes in the Fund’s NAV and supply and demand of shares on the secondary market. It cannot be predicted whether Fund shares will trade below, at or above its NAV. As a result, shareholders of the Fund may pay more than NAV when purchasing shares (a premium) and receive less than NAV when selling Fund shares (a discount). This risk is heightened in times of market volatility or periods of steep market declines. In such market conditions, market or stop-loss orders to sell the ETF shares may be executed at market prices that are significantly below a Fund's NAV. The market prices of Fund shares may deviate significantly from the NAV of the shares during periods of market volatility or if the Fund’s holdings are or become more illiquid. Disruptions to creations and redemptions may result in trading prices that differ significantly from the Fund’s NAV. In addition, market prices of Fund shares may deviate significantly from the NAV if the number of Fund shares outstanding is smaller or if there is less active trading in a Fund's shares. Investors purchasing and selling Fund shares in the secondary market may not experience investment results consistent with those experienced by those creating and redeeming directly with the Fund.

Secondary Market Trading Risk: Investors buying or selling shares in the secondary market will normally pay brokerage commissions, which are often a fixed amount and may be a significant proportional cost for investors buying or selling relatively small amounts of Fund shares. In addition, an investor may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price (the price secondary market investors are willing to pay for shares) and the ask price (the price at which secondary market investors are willing to sell shares)). This difference in bid and ask prices is
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often referred to as the “spread” or “bid/ask spread.” The bid/ask spread varies over time for shares based on trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally tighter if a Fund’s shares have more trading volume and market liquidity and wider if the Fund’s shares have little trading volume and market liquidity. Increased market volatility may cause increased bid/ask spreads.

Although Fund shares are listed for trading on an Exchange, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such shares will develop or be maintained or that the Fund’s shares will continue to be listed. Trading in Fund shares may be halted due to market conditions or for reasons that, in the view of the Exchanges, make trading in shares inadvisable. In addition, trading in shares is subject to trading halts caused by extraordinary market volatility pursuant to Exchange “circuit breaker” rules. There can be no assurance that the requirements of the Exchanges necessary to maintain the listing of any Fund will continue to be met or will remain unchanged or that the shares will trade with any volume, or at all.

Equity Securities Risk: A Fund is subject to the risk that stock prices will fall over short or extended periods of time. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments, or as a result of irregular and/or unexpected trading activity among retail investors. The prices of securities issued by these companies may decline in response to such developments, which could result in a decline in the value of the Funds’ shares. These factors contribute to price volatility. In addition, common stocks represent a share of ownership in a company, and rank after bonds and preferred stock in their claim on the company’s assets in the event of liquidation.
 
Large-Cap Risk: A Fund is subject to the risk that stocks of larger companies may underperform relative to those of small- and mid-sized companies. Large-cap companies may be unable to respond quickly to new competitive challenges, such as changes in technology and consumer tastes, and also may not be able to attain the high growth rate of successful smaller companies, especially during extended periods of economic expansion.
 
Mid-Cap Risk: A Fund is subject to the risk that medium capitalization stocks may underperform other types of stocks or the equity markets as a whole. Stocks of mid-sized companies may be subject to more abrupt or erratic market movements than stocks of larger, more established companies. Mid-sized companies may have limited product lines or financial resources, and may be dependent upon a particular niche of the market.
 
Preferred Stock Risk:  Preferred stock represents an equity interest in an issuer that pays dividends at a specified rate and that has precedence over common stock in the payment of dividends. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds take precedence over the claims of those who own preferred and common stock. If interest rates rise, the fixed dividend on preferred stocks may be less attractive, causing the price of preferred stocks to decline. Preferred stock may have mandatory sinking fund provisions, as well as provisions allowing the stock to be called or redeemed prior to its maturity, both of which can have a negative impact on the stock’s price when interest rates decline.

Fixed Income Risk: The market value of the Fund’s fixed-income securities responds to economic developments, particularly interest rate changes, as well as to perceptions about the creditworthiness of individual issuers, including governments. Generally, the Fund’s fixed-income securities will decrease in value if interest rates rise and increase in value if interest rates fall. Normally, the longer the maturity or duration of the fixed-income securities the Fund owns, the more sensitive the value of the Fund’s shares will be to changes in interest rates. The fixed-income securities market has been and may continue to be negatively affected by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. As with other serious economic disruptions, governmental authorities and regulators are responding to this crisis with significant fiscal and monetary policy changes, including considerably lowering interest rates, which, in some cases could result in negative interest rates. These actions, including their possible unexpected or sudden reversal or potential ineffectiveness, could further increase volatility in securities and other financial markets and reduce market liquidity. To the extent the Fund has a bank deposit or holds a debt instrument with a negative interest rate to maturity, the Fund would generate a negative return on that investment. Similarly, negative rates on investments by money market funds and similar cash management products could lead to losses on investments, including on investments of the Fund's uninvested cash.

Asset-Backed Securities Risk: Asset-backed securities are fixed income securities backed by other assets such as credit card, automobile or consumer loan receivables, retail installment loans, or participations in pools of leases. Credit support for these securities may be based on the structural features such as subordination or overcollateralization and/or provided through credit enhancements by a third party. Even with a credit enhancement by a third party, there is still risk of loss. There could be inadequate collateral or no collateral for asset-backed securities. The values of these securities are sensitive to changes in the credit quality of the underlying collateral, the credit strength of the credit enhancement, changes in interest rates, and, at times, the financial condition of the issuer. Some asset-backed securities also may receive prepayments that can change the securities’ effective durations.
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Credit Risk: The fixed-income securities in the Fund’s portfolio are subject to the possibility that a deterioration, whether sudden or gradual, in the financial condition of an issuer, or a deterioration in general economic conditions, could cause an issuer to fail to make timely payments of principal or interest when due. This may cause the issuer’s securities to decline in value. Credit risk is particularly relevant to those portfolios that invest a significant amount of their assets in non-investment grade (or "junk") bonds or lower-rated securities.

Interest Rate Risk: The market price of debt securities is generally linked to the prevailing market interest rates. In general, when interest rates rise, the prices of debt securities fall, and when interest rates fall, the prices of debt securities rise. The price volatility of a debt security also depends on its maturity. Longer-term securities are generally more volatile, so the longer the average maturity or duration of these securities, the greater their price risk. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a security’s price to changes in interest rates that incorporates a security’s yield, coupon, final maturity, and call features, among other characteristics. The longer a fixed-income security’s duration, the more sensitive it will be to changes in interest rates. Specifically, duration is the change in the value of a fixed-income security that will result from a 1% change in interest rates, and generally is stated in years. For example, as a general rule a 1% rise in interest rates means a 1% fall in value for every year of duration. Maturity, on the other hand, is the date on which a fixed-income security becomes due for payment of principal. There may be less governmental intervention in the securities markets in the near future. An increase in interest rates could negatively impact a Fund’s net asset value. Recent and potential future changes in government monetary policy may affect the level of interest rates.
 
Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Investment-grade debt securities may be downgraded by a NRSRO to below-investment-grade status, which would increase the risk of holding these securities. Investment-grade debt securities rated in the lowest rating category by a NRSRO involve a higher degree of risk than fixed-income securities with higher credit ratings. While such securities are considered investment-grade quality and are deemed to have adequate capacity for payment of principal and interest, such securities lack outstanding investment characteristics and may share certain speculative characteristics with non-investment-grade securities.

Mortgage-Backed Securities Risk: Mortgage-backed securities are fixed income securities representing an interest in a pool of underlying mortgage loans. Mortgage-backed securities are sensitive to changes in interest rates, but may respond to these changes differently from other fixed income securities due to the possibility of prepayment of the underlying mortgage loans. As a result, it may not be possible to determine in advance the actual maturity date or average life of a mortgage-backed security. Rising interest rates tend to discourage re-financings, with the result that the average life and volatility of the security will increase, exacerbating its decrease in market price. When interest rates fall, however, mortgage-backed securities may not gain as much in market value because of the expectation of additional mortgage prepayments that must be reinvested at lower interest rates. Prepayment risk may make it difficult to calculate the average duration of the Fund’s mortgage-backed securities and, therefore, to fully assess the interest rate risk of the Fund. An unexpectedly high rate of defaults on the mortgages held by a mortgage pool may adversely affect the value of mortgage-backed securities and could result in losses to the Fund. The risk of such defaults is generally higher in the cases of mortgage pools that include subprime mortgages. Subprime mortgages refer to loans made to borrowers with weakened credit histories or with lower capacity to make timely payments on their mortgages. In addition, mortgage-backed securities may fluctuate in price based on deterioration in the perceived or actual value of the collateral underlying the pool of mortgage loans, typically residential or commercial real estate, which may result in negative amortization or negative equity meaning that the value of the collateral would be worth less than the remaining principal amount owed on the mortgages in the pool. The mortgage-backed securities market has been and may continue to be negatively affected by the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The U.S. government, its agencies or its instrumentalities may implement initiatives in response to the economic impacts of the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic applicable to federally backed mortgage loans. These initiatives could involve forbearance of mortgage payments or suspension or restrictions of foreclosures and evictions. The Fund cannot predict with certainty the extent to which such initiatives or the economic effects of the pandemic generally may affect rates of prepayment or default or adversely impact the value of the Fund's investments in securities in the mortgage industry as a whole.
 
Non-Investment-Grade Debt Securities Risk: Non-investment-grade debt securities are sometimes referred to as “junk bonds” and are considered speculative with respect to their issuers’ ability to make payments of interest and principal. There is a high risk that a Fund could suffer a loss from investments in non-investment-grade debt securities caused by the default of an issuer of such securities. Part of the reason for this high risk is that non-investment-grade debt securities are generally unsecured and therefore, in the event of a default or bankruptcy, holders of non-investment-grade debt securities generally will not receive payments until the holders of all other debt have been paid. Non-investment-grade debt securities may also be less liquid than investment-grade debt securities.

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Prepayment Risk: Prepayment risk is the risk that a debt security may be paid off and proceeds invested earlier than anticipated. Prepayment risk is more prevalent during periods of falling interest rates. Prepayment impacts both the interest rate sensitivity of the underlying asset, such as an asset-backed or mortgage-backed security, and its cash flow projections. Therefore, prepayment risk may make it difficult to calculate the average duration of the Fund's asset- or mortgage-backed securities which in turn would make it difficult to assess the interest rate risk of the Fund.

U.S. Government Securities Risk: Certain U.S. government securities are backed by the right of the issuer to borrow from the U.S. Treasury while others are supported only by the credit of the issuer or instrumentality. While the U.S. government is able to provide financial support to U.S. government-sponsored agencies or instrumentalities, no assurance can be given that it will always do so. Such securities are neither issued nor guaranteed by the U.S. Treasury.
 
Foreign Securities Risk: Investing in foreign securities poses additional risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers, while such events may not necessarily affect the U.S. economy or issuers located in the United States. In addition, investments in foreign securities are generally denominated in foreign currency. As a result, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect the value of the Fund’s investments. These currency movements may happen separately from, or in response to, events that do not otherwise affect the value of the security in the issuer’s home country. There is a risk that issuers of foreign securities may not be subject to accounting standards or governmental supervision comparable to those to which U.S. companies are subject and that less public information about their operations may exist. There is risk associated with the clearance and settlement procedures in non-U.S. markets, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions and may cause delays. Foreign markets may be less liquid and more volatile than U.S. markets and offer less protection to investors. Over-the-counter securities may also be less liquid than exchange-traded securities. Investments in securities of foreign issuers may be subject to foreign withholding and other taxes. In addition, it may be more difficult and costly for the Fund to seek recovery from an issuer located outside the United States in the event of a default on a portfolio security or an issuer’s insolvency proceeding. To the extent a Fund focuses its investments in a single country or only a few countries in a particular geographic region, economic, political, regulatory or other conditions affecting such country or region may have a greater impact on Fund performance relative to a more geographically diversified fund.

While a Fund’s net assets are valued in U.S. dollars, the securities of foreign companies are frequently denominated in foreign currencies. Thus, a change in the value of a foreign currency against the U.S. dollar will result in a corresponding change in value of securities denominated in that currency. Some of the factors that may impair the investments denominated in a foreign currency are: (1) it may be expensive to convert foreign currencies into U.S. dollars and vice versa; (2) complex political and economic factors may significantly affect the values of various currencies, including U.S. dollars, and their exchange rates; (3) government intervention may increase risks involved in purchasing or selling foreign currency options, forward contracts and futures contracts, since exchange rates may not be free to fluctuate in response to other market forces; (4) there may be no systematic reporting of last sale information for foreign currencies or regulatory requirement that quotations available through dealers or other market sources be firm or revised on a timely basis; (5) available quotation information is generally representative of very large round-lot transactions in the inter-bank market and thus may not reflect exchange rates for smaller odd-lot transactions (less than $1 million) where rates may be less favorable; and (6) the inter-bank market in foreign currencies is a global, around-the-clock market. To the extent that a market is closed while the markets for the underlying currencies remain open, certain markets may not always reflect significant price and rate movements.

Emerging Markets Risk: Investments in the securities of issuers based in countries with emerging-market economies are subject to greater levels of risk and uncertainty than investments in more-developed foreign markets, since emerging-market securities may present market, credit, currency, liquidity, legal, political, and other risks greater than, or in addition to, the risks of investing in developed foreign countries. These risks include high currency exchange-rate fluctuations; increased risk of default (including both government and private issuers); greater social, economic, and political uncertainty and instability (including the risk of war); more substantial governmental involvement in the economy; less governmental supervision and regulation of the securities markets and participants in those markets; controls on foreign investment and limitations on repatriation of invested capital and on a fund’s ability to exchange local currencies for U.S. dollars; unavailability of currency hedging techniques in certain emerging-market countries; the fact that companies in emerging-market countries may be newly organized, smaller, and less seasoned; the difference in, or lack of, auditing and financial reporting requirements or standards, which may result in the unavailability of material information about issuers; different clearance and settlement procedures, which may be unable to keep pace with the volume of securities transactions or otherwise make it difficult to engage in such transactions; difficulties in obtaining and/or enforcing legal judgments against non-U.S. companies and non-U.S. persons, including company directors and officers, in foreign jurisdictions; and significantly smaller market capitalizations of emerging-market issuers. In addition, shareholders of emerging market issuers, such as the Fund, often have limited rights and few practical remedies in emerging markets. Finally, the risks
35


associated with investments in emerging markets often are significant, and vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction and company to company.

Sovereign Debt Risk: The actions of foreign governments concerning their respective economies could have an important effect on their ability or willingness to service their sovereign debt. Such actions could have significant effects on market conditions and on the prices of securities and instruments held by a Fund, including the securities and instruments of foreign private issuers. Factors which may influence the ability or willingness of foreign sovereigns to service debt include, but are not limited to: the availability of sufficient foreign exchange on the date payment is due; the relative size of its debt service burden to the economy as a whole; its balance of payments (including export performance) and cash flow situation; its access to international credits and investments; fluctuations in interest and currency rates and reserves; and its government's policies towards the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and other international agencies. If a foreign sovereign defaults on all or a portion of its foreign debt, a Fund may have limited legal recourse against the issuer and/or guarantor. In some cases, remedies must be pursued in the courts of the defaulting party itself, and the ability of the holder of foreign sovereign debt securities to obtain recourse may be subject to the political climate in the prevailing country which could substantially delay or defeat any recovery.
 
Management Risk:  In managing a Fund’s portfolio, the Advisor may engage one or more sub-advisors to make investment decisions on a portion of or the entire portfolio.  There is a risk that the Advisor may be unable to identify and retain sub-advisors who achieve superior investment returns relative to other similar sub-advisors.  The value of your investment may decrease if the sub-advisor incorrectly judges the attractiveness, value, or market trends affecting a particular security, issuer, industry, or sector.

Mortgage Dollar Roll Risk: Mortgage “dollar rolls” are transactions in which mortgage-backed securities are sold for delivery in the current month and the seller simultaneously contracts to repurchase substantially similar securities on a specified future date. The difference between the sale price and the purchase price (plus any interest earned on the cash proceeds of the sale) is netted against the interest income foregone on the securities sold to arrive at an implied borrowing rate. Alternatively, the sale and purchase transactions can be executed at the same price, with the Fund being paid a fee as consideration for entering into the commitment to purchase. If the broker-dealer to whom the Fund sells the security becomes insolvent, the Fund’s right to repurchase the security may be restricted. Other risks involved in entering into mortgage dollar rolls include the risk that the value of the security may change adversely over the term of the mortgage dollar roll and that the security the Fund is required to repurchase may be worth less than the security that the Fund originally held.

Municipal Securities Risk: The value of municipal securities may be affected by uncertainties in the municipal market related to legislation or litigation involving the taxation of municipal securities or the rights of municipal securities holders in the event of a bankruptcy. In addition, the ongoing issues facing the national economy may negatively impact the economic performance of issuers of municipal securities, and may increase the likelihood that issuers of securities in which the Fund may invest may be unable to meet their obligations. Proposals to restrict or eliminate the federal income tax exemption for interest on municipal securities are introduced before Congress from time to time. Proposals also may be introduced before state legislatures that would affect the state tax treatment of a municipal fund's distributions. If such proposals were enacted, the availability of municipal securities and the value of a municipal fund's holdings would be affected, and the Trustees would reevaluate the Fund's investment goals and policies. Municipal bankruptcies are relatively rare, and certain provisions of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code governing such bankruptcies are unclear and remain untested. Further, the application of state law to municipal issuers could produce varying results among the states or among municipal securities issuers within a state. The ability of a municipal issuer to seek bankruptcy protection may be subject to the authorization of the executive or legislative branch of the state's government, and a municipal bankruptcy may be subject to challenge in the state's courts.  These legal uncertainties could affect the municipal securities market generally, certain specific segments of the market, or the relative credit quality of particular securities. There is also the possibility that as a result of litigation or other conditions, the power or ability of issuers to meet their obligations for the payment of interest and principal on their municipal securities may be materially affected or their obligations may be found to be invalid or unenforceable. Such litigation or conditions may from time to time have the effect of introducing uncertainties in the market for municipal securities or certain segments thereof, or of materially affecting the credit risk with respect to particular bonds. Adverse economic, business, legal or political developments might affect all or a substantial portion of the Fund's municipal securities in the same manner. Also, some municipal obligations may be backed by a letter of credit issued by a bank or other financial institution. Adverse developments affecting banks or other financial institutions could have a negative effect on the value of the Fund's portfolio securities.

In making investments, the Fund and the investment sub-advisor will rely on the opinion of issuers' bond counsel. Neither the Fund nor the sub-advisor will independently review the basis for those tax opinions. If any of those tax opinions are ultimately determined to be incorrect, the Fund and its shareholders could be subject to substantial tax liabilities. Certain provisions of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the "Code"), relating to the issuance of municipal obligations may reduce the
36


volume of municipal securities that qualify for federal tax exemptions. Proposals that may further restrict or eliminate the income tax exemptions for interest on municipal obligations may be introduced in the future. If any such proposal became law, it may reduce the number of municipal obligations available for purchase by the Fund and could adversely affect the Fund's shareholders by subjecting the income from the Fund to tax. If this occurs, the Fund would reevaluate its investment goals and policies to the extent that legislative or legal developments materially affect the Fund.

In order to be tax exempt, tax-exempt securities must meet certain legal requirements. Failure to meet such requirements may cause the interest received and distributed by the Fund to shareholders to be taxable. The Fund may invest in securities whose interest is subject to state tax, federal regular income tax, or AMT. Consult your tax professional for more information.

The costs associated with combating the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and the negative impact on tax revenues has adversely affected the financial condition of many states and their political subdivisions. The effects of this pandemic could affect the ability of states and their political subdivisions to make payments on debt obligations when due and could adversely impact the value of their bonds, which could negatively impact the performance of the Fund.

Non-Diversification Risk: A non-diversified fund may invest a significant percentage of its assets in the securities of a limited number of issuers, subject to federal income tax restrictions relating to the fund’s qualification as a regulated investment company. Because a higher percentage of a non-diversified fund’s holdings may be invested in the securities of a limited number of issuers, the fund may be more susceptible to risks associated with a single economic, business, political or regulatory event than a diversified fund.

Portfolio Turnover Risk: Each Fund may sell its portfolio securities, regardless of the length of time that they have been held, if the sub-advisor determines that it would be in the Fund’s best interest to do so. It may be appropriate to buy or sell portfolio securities due to economic, market, or other factors that are not within the sub-advisor’s control. These transactions will increase a Fund’s “portfolio turnover.” A 100% portfolio turnover rate would occur if all of the securities in the Fund were replaced during a given period. Frequent and active trading may result in greater expenses to the Fund, which may lower the Fund’s performance and may result in the realization of substantial capital gains, including net short-term capital gains. As a result, high portfolio turnover may reduce the Fund’s returns.

Repurchase Agreement Risk: Under all repurchase agreements entered into by the Fund, the Fund’s custodian or its agent must take possession of the underlying collateral.  However, if the counterparty defaults, the Fund could realize a loss on the sale of the underlying security to the extent that the proceeds of sale, including accrued interest, are less than the resale price provided in the agreement including interest.  In addition, even though the Bankruptcy Code provides protection for most repurchase agreements, if the seller should be involved in bankruptcy or insolvency proceedings, the Fund may incur delay and costs in selling the underlying security or may suffer a loss of principal and interest if the Fund is treated as an unsecured creditor and is required to return the underlying security to the seller’s estate.  Repurchase agreements are considered loans by the Fund.

Sector Focus Risk: A fund that focuses its investments in the securities of a particular market sector is subject to the risk that adverse circumstances will have a greater impact on the fund than a fund that does not focus its investments in a particular sector. It is possible that economic, business or political developments or other changes affecting one security in the sector of focus will affect other securities in that sector of focus in the same manner, thereby increasing the risk of such investments.
 
Value Investing Risk: Value investing presents the risk that a fund’s security holdings may never reach their full market value because the market fails to recognize what the portfolio managers consider the true business value or because the portfolio managers have misjudged those values. In addition, value investing may fall out of favor and underperform growth or other styles of investing during given certain periods. There is also the risk that the portfolio managers may determine to sell a position prior to it reaching its intrinsic value.
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THE FUNDS’ MANAGEMENT
 
Investment Advisor

Touchstone Advisors, Inc. ("Touchstone Advisors"), located at 303 Broadway, Suite 1100, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202, serves as the Funds' investment advisor.

Touchstone Advisors has been a registered investment advisor since 1994.  As of March 31, 2022, Touchstone Advisors had approximately $30.8 billion in assets under management.  As the Funds’ investment advisor, Touchstone Advisors reviews, supervises, and administers the Funds’ investment programs and also ensures compliance with the Funds’ investment policies and guidelines.
 
Touchstone Advisors is responsible for selecting each Fund’s sub-advisor(s), subject to approval by the Board.  Touchstone Advisors selects a sub-advisor that has shown good investment performance in its areas of expertise.  Touchstone Advisors considers various factors in evaluating a sub-advisor, including:
 
Level of knowledge and skill;
Performance as compared to its peers or benchmark;
Consistency of performance over 5 years or more;
Level of compliance with investment rules and strategies;
Employees, facilities and financial strength; and
Quality of service.
 
Touchstone Advisors will also continually monitor each sub-advisor’s performance through various analyses and through in-person, telephone, and written consultations with a sub-advisor. Touchstone Advisors discusses its expectations for performance with each sub-advisor and provides evaluations and recommendations to the Board of Trustees, including whether or not a sub-advisor’s contract should be renewed, modified, or terminated.
 
The SEC has granted an exemptive order that permits Touchstone ETF Trust (the "Trust") or Touchstone Advisors, under certain conditions, to select or change unaffiliated sub-advisors, enter into new sub-advisory agreements, or amend existing sub-advisory agreements without first obtaining shareholder approval. The Funds must still obtain shareholder approval of any sub-advisory agreement with a sub-advisor affiliated with the Trust or Touchstone Advisors other than by reason of serving as a sub-advisor to one or more Touchstone Funds. Shareholders of a Fund will be notified of any changes to its sub-advisor.

The Trust has applied for and intends to rely upon an order from the SEC that will permit the Advisor, subject to approval by the Board of Trustees, to appoint an affiliated sub-advisor or change the terms of such a sub-advisory agreement without obtaining shareholder approval. Once received, the Trust would be permitted to rely upon the SEC order to change affiliated sub-advisors, or the fees paid to such a sub-advisor, without the expense and delays associated with obtaining shareholder approval of the change. This order does not, however, permit the Advisor to increase the aggregate advisory fee rate of each Fund without the approval of the shareholders.

Two or more sub-advisors may manage a Fund, from time to time, with each managing a portion of the Fund’s assets.  If a Fund has more than one sub-advisor, Touchstone Advisors allocates how much of a Fund’s assets are managed by each sub-advisor. Touchstone Advisors may change these allocations from time to time, often based upon the results of its evaluations of the sub-advisors.
 
Touchstone Advisors is also responsible for running all of the operations of the Funds, except those that are subcontracted to a sub-advisor, custodian, transfer agent, sub-administrative agent or other parties. For its services, Touchstone Advisors is entitled to receive an investment advisory fee from the Funds at an annualized rate, based on the average daily net assets of each Fund.  Touchstone Advisors pays sub-advisory fees to the sub-advisor from its advisory fee.  
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Fund Annual Investment Advisory Fee Rate
Dividend Select ETF 0.55% on the first $1 billion; and
0.50% on assets over $1 billion
Strategic Income Opportunities ETF 0.55% on the first $250 million;
0.50% on the next $250 million; and
0.45% on assets over $500 million
US Large Cap Focused ETF 0.70% on the first $500 million;
0.65% on the next $300 million;
0.60% on the next $200 million;
0.50% on the next $1 billion; and
0.40% on assets over $2 billion
Ultra Short Income ETF 0.25% on all assets

Advisory and Sub-Advisory Agreement Approval. A discussion of the basis for the Board's approval of the Funds’ advisory and sub-advisory agreements will be included in the Trust’s December 31, 2022 annual report, once available.

Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (“Fort Washington”) is an affiliate of Touchstone Advisors and serves as sub-advisor to the Funds. Therefore, Touchstone Advisors may have a conflict of interest when making decisions to keep Fort Washington as sub-advisor to these Funds. The Board will review Touchstone Advisors’ decisions, with respect to the retention of Fort Washington, to reduce the possibility of a conflict of interest situation.

Additional Information

The Board oversees generally the operations of each Fund and the Trust. The Trust enters into contractual arrangements with various parties, including, among others, the Funds' investment advisor, custodian, transfer agent, accountants and distributor, who provide services to each Fund. Shareholders are not parties to, or intended (or “third-party”) beneficiaries of, any of those contractual arrangements, and those contractual arrangements are not intended to create in any such individual shareholder or group of shareholders any right to enforce the terms of the contractual arrangements against the service providers or to seek any remedy under the contractual arrangements against the service providers, either directly or on behalf of the Trust.

This prospectus provides information concerning the Trust and the Funds that you should consider in determining whether to purchase shares of a Fund. The Funds may make changes to this information from time to time. Neither this prospectus, the SAI or any document filed as an exhibit to the Trust’s registration statement, is intended to, nor does it, give rise to an agreement or contract between the Trust or a Fund and its shareholders, or give rise to any contract or other rights in any such individual shareholder or group of shareholders or other person other than any rights conferred explicitly by federal or state securities laws that may not be waived.

Sub-Advisor and Portfolio Managers
 
Listed below is the sub-advisor and its respective portfolio managers that have responsibility for the day-to-day management of each Fund. A brief biographical description of each portfolio manager is also provided. The SAI provides additional information about the portfolio managers’ investments in the Fund or Funds that they manage, a description of their compensation structure, and information regarding other accounts that they manage.

Fort Washington Investment Advisors, Inc. (“Fort Washington”), located at 303 Broadway, Suite 1200, Cincinnati, Ohio 45202, serves as the sub-advisor to the Funds. As the sub-advisor, Fort Washington makes investment decisions for the Funds and also ensures compliance with the Touchstone Funds’ investment policies and guidelines.  Fort Washington is controlled by Western & Southern Mutual Holding Company. Jill T. McGruder and E. Blake Moore, Jr., interested Trustees of the Trust, may be deemed to be affiliates of Fort Washington. As of March 31, 2022, Fort Washington had approximately $75.8 billion in assets under management, which includes $4.8 billion in commitments managed by Fort Washington Capital Partners Group, a division of Fort Washington.
 
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Dividend Select ETF

Austin R. Kummer, CFA, Vice President and Senior Portfolio Manager. Mr. Kummer joined Fort Washington in 2013. He focuses on portfolio management and research functions within Multi-Sector Fixed Income and Dividend Equity strategies. He also contributes to asset allocation and macro positioning for the firm and has shared responsibility for the company’s Private Debt portfolio. Mr. Kummer received a BBA from Ohio University in Finance and Business Economics and an MBA in Finance from Xavier University. He is a CFA charterholder.

Brendan M. White, CFA. Mr. White is a Senior Vice President and Co-Chief Investment Officer of Fort Washington. In this role, Mr. White is responsible for overseeing the investment activity for all assets under management with emphasis on all fixed-income functions while collaborating with James Vance, Co-Chief Investment Officer, on all investment decisions. Mr. White also shares responsibility for asset allocation and macro-positioning for both Fort Washington and Western & Southern Financial Group. Mr. White joined Fort Washington in 1993 and has more than 30 years of industry experience. Prior to joining the firm, he was with Ohio Casualty Corporation where he was a securities analyst supporting the High Yield and Mortgage-Backed Securities portfolios. He is a CFA charterholder.

James E. Wilhelm, Jr. Mr. Wilhelm joined Fort Washington in 2002. Mr. Wilhelm has investment experience dating back to 1993. He began as a Senior Equity Analyst in 2002 and was named Portfolio Manager in 2005. He became Assistant Vice President in 2007, Vice President in 2008, Managing Director in 2014, and was Head of Public Equities from 2015 to 2020.

Prior Performance for Similar Accounts Managed by Fort Washington

The following table sets forth composite performance data relating to the historical performance of all accounts (except as noted below) managed by Fort Washington for the periods indicated with investment objectives, policies, strategies, and risks substantially similar to those of the Dividend Select ETF. The data is provided to illustrate the past performance of Fort Washington in managing substantially similar accounts as measured against market indices and does not represent the performance of the Fund. The following accounts are excluded from the composite: accounts that do not pay fees, accounts that are not fully discretionary, and accounts that have less than $25 million under management, which is the minimum amount necessary to fully implement the investment strategy.

The following performance information is not the Dividend Select ETF’s performance, should not be considered indicative of the past or future performance of the Fund, and should not be considered a substitute for the Fund’s performance.

Average Annual Total Returns
For the periods ended December 31, 2021
  1 Year Since Inception*
Fort Washington Dividend Select Equity Composite (Gross)
25.84% 18.12%
Fort Washington Dividend Select Equity Composite (Net)
25.78% 18.06%
Russell 1000® Value Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
25.16% 13.43%
*The inception date for the Composite is January 1, 2020.

The Fort Washington Dividend Select Equity Composite (the “Composite”) represents the investment performance track record of Fort Washington's dividend select equity strategy, which is the strategy that will be used to manage the Fund. The accounts comprising the Composite are not subject to the same types of expenses to which the Fund is subject, certain investment limitations, diversification requirements, and other restrictions imposed by the 1940 Act and the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Thus, the performance results for the account could have been adversely affected if the account had been regulated as investment companies under federal securities and tax laws. The method for computing historical performance information for the Composite differs from the SEC's method for computing the historical performance of the Dividend Select ETF.

The Composite’s returns shown above are presented gross and net of management fees and include the reinvestment of all income. Gross returns will be reduced by investment advisory fees and other expenses that may be incurred in the management of the account. Net of fee performance was calculated using all actual fees and expenses including the management fee. Individual portfolio returns are calculated on a daily valuation basis. These fees and expenses are not
40


reflective of the fees and expenses of the Dividend Select ETF and may vary depending on, among other things, the applicable fee schedule and portfolio size. All returns are expressed in U.S. dollars. The Dividend Select ETF’s fees are reflected in its fee table in the "Summary" section of this prospectus.

The performance information for the Composite was calculated in accordance with Global Investment Performance Standards (GIPS®). The Composite performance information is intended to illustrate past performance for substantially similarly managed accounts by Fort Washington. Past performance of the Composite is not indicative of future results. As with any investment there is always the potential for gains as well as the possibility of losses. The Composite performance information presented herein has been calculated and provided by the Dividend Select ETF''s sub-advisor.

Strategic Income Opportunities ETF

Daniel J. Carter, CFA, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager. Mr. Carter began as an Assistant Portfolio Manager of Fort Washington in 2000 and has been an Assistant Vice President and Portfolio Manager since 2007. Mr. Carter’s responsibilities include portfolio management of diversified broad market fixed income portfolios and the Emerging Markets Debt strategy. He also serves as an asset specialist for the Government (Treasury/Agency/TIPS) sectors within the fixed income markets. Mr. Carter joined the firm in 2000 as a credit analyst. Prior to joining Fort Washington, Mr. Carter was an analyst focusing on fixed income with the Ohio Casualty Group and Provident Financial Group. He received a BS in Business (Finance and Accounting) from Miami University and is a CFA charterholder.

Austin R. Kummer, CFA, Vice President and Senior Portfolio Manager. Mr. Kummer joined Fort Washington in 2013. He focuses on portfolio management and research functions within Multi-Sector Fixed Income and Dividend Equity strategies. He also contributes to asset allocation and macro positioning for the firm and has shared responsibility for the company’s Private Debt portfolio. Mr. Kummer received a BBA from Ohio University in Finance and Business Economics and an MBA in Finance from Xavier University. He is a CFA charterholder.

Brendan M. White, CFA, is a Senior Vice President and Co-Chief Investment Officer of Fort Washington. In this role, Mr. White is responsible for overseeing the investment activity for all assets under management with emphasis on all fixed-income functions while collaborating with James Vance, Co-Chief Investment Officer, on all investment decisions. Mr. White also shares responsibility for asset allocation and macro-positioning for both Fort Washington and Western & Southern Financial Group. Mr. White joined Fort Washington in 1993 and has more than 30 years of industry experience. Prior to joining the firm, he was with Ohio Casualty Corporation where he was a securities analyst supporting the High Yield and Mortgage-Backed Securities portfolios. He is a CFA charterholder.

Prior Performance for Similar Accounts Managed by Fort Washington

The following table sets forth composite performance data relating to the historical performance of all accounts (except as noted below) managed by Fort Washington for the periods indicated with investment objectives, policies, strategies, and risks substantially similar to those of the Strategic Income Opportunities ETF. The data is provided to illustrate the past performance of Fort Washington in managing substantially similar accounts as measured against market indices and does not represent the performance of the Fund. The following accounts are excluded from the composite: accounts that do not pay fees, accounts that are not fully discretionary, and accounts that have less than $25 million under management, which is the minimum amount necessary to fully implement the investment strategy.

The following performance information is not the Strategic Income Opportunities ETF’s performance, should not be considered indicative of the past or future performance of the Fund, and should not be considered a substitute for the Fund’s performance.

Average Annual Total Returns
For the periods ended December 31, 2021
1 Year
3 Years
Since Inception*
Fort Washington Strategic Income Composite (Gross)
3.24
%
8.85
%
6.66
%
Fort Washington Strategic Income Composite (Net)
2.99
%
8.66
%
6.51
%
Bloomberg U.S. Aggregate Bond Index (reflects no deductions for fees, expenses or taxes)
(1.54)
%
4.79
%
3.46
%
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*The inception date for the Composite is July 1, 2017.

The Fort Washington Strategic Income Composite (the “Composite”) represents the investment performance track record of Fort Washington's strategic income strategy, which is the strategy that will be used to manage the Fund. The accounts comprising the Composite are not subject to the same types of expenses to which the Fund is subject, certain investment limitations, diversification requirements, and other restrictions imposed by the 1940 Act and the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended. Thus, the performance results for the account could have been adversely affected if the account had been regulated as investment companies under federal securities and tax laws. The method for computing historical performance information for the Composite differs from the SEC's method for computing the historical performance of the Strategic Income Opportunities ETF.

The Composite’s returns shown above are presented gross and net of management fees and include the reinvestment of all income. Gross returns will be reduced by investment advisory fees and other expenses that may be incurred in the management of the account. Net of fee performance was calculated using all actual fees and expenses including the management fee. Individual portfolio returns are calculated on a daily valuation basis. These fees and expenses are not reflective of the fees and expenses of the Strategic Income Opportunities ETF and may vary depending on, among other things, the applicable fee schedule and portfolio size. All returns are expressed in U.S. dollars. The Strategic Income Opportunities ETF’s fees are reflected in its fee table in the "Summary" section of this prospectus.

The performance information for the Composite was calculated in accordance with Global Investment Performance Standards (GIPS®). The Composite performance information is intended to illustrate past performance for substantially similarly managed accounts by Fort Washington. Past performance of the Composite is not indicative of future results. As with any investment there is always the potential for gains as well as the possibility of losses. The Composite performance information presented herein has been calculated and provided by the Strategic Income Opportunities ETF''s sub-advisor.

US Large Cap Focused ETF

James E. Wilhelm, Jr., Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, joined Fort Washington in 2002. He has investment experience dating back to 1993. He began as a Senior Equity Analyst in 2002 and was named Portfolio Manager in 2005. He became Assistant Vice President in 2007, Vice President in 2008, Managing Director in 2014, and was Head of Public Equities from 2015 to 2020.

Ultra Short Income ETF
 
Scott D. Weston , Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, joined Fort Washington in September 1999.  He is also Fort Washington’s head of structured products and lead sector specialist in collateralized loan obligations. Mr. Weston is a graduate of the University of Utah with a BS in Political Science and the University of Cincinnati with an MBA in Finance. He has investment experience dating back to 1992 and is jointly and primarily responsible for the management of the Fund.
Brent A. Miller , CFA, Vice President and Senior Portfolio Manager, joined Fort Washington in June 2001 and is jointly and primarily responsible for the management of the Fund. He became a portfolio manager in 2008 and was an assistant portfolio manager prior to 2008.  He is also lead sector specialist in mortgage-backed securities. Mr. Miller graduated Magna Cum Laude from the University of Evansville with a BS in Mathematics. He has investment experience dating back to 1999. He is a CFA charterholder.

Laura L. Mayfield , Senior Portfolio Manager, joined Fort Washington in 2007. She became Senior Portfolio Manager in 2020 and is lead sector specialist in asset-backed securities. Ms. Mayfield graduated from Olivet Nazarene University with a BA in Marketing and Spanish, and received her MBA from Xavier University. She has investment experience dating back to 2010 and is jointly and primarily responsible for the management of the Fund.
 
DISTRIBUTION AND FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES

Distributor. Foreside Fund Services, LLC (the "Distributor") serves as the distributor of each Fund. Touchstone Advisors will pay from its own resources and not from a Fund's assets the Distributor for distribution-related services provided to the Funds.

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Rule 12b-1 Distribution Plans. The Board has adopted a Rule 12b-1 plan, which allows payment of marketing fees of up to 0.25% of a Fund’s average net assets; however, the Funds' Board of Trustees has not authorized such payments to be made. The Rule 12b-1 plan is intended to remain dormant. None of the Funds will accrue or incur any Rule 12b-1 fees under the Rule 12b-1 plan until such future date as the Board determines to activate the plan.

Additional Compensation to Financial Intermediaries. Touchstone Advisors may pay certain broker-dealers, banks and other financial intermediaries, from its own resources, that support the sale of Fund shares or provide services to Fund shareholders or for participating in activities that are designed to make registered representatives and other professionals more knowledgeable about exchange traded products, including each Fund, or for other activities such as participating in marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems. The amounts of these payments could be significant, and may create an incentive for the financial intermediary or its employees or associated persons to recommend or sell shares of the Fund to you. Not all financial intermediaries receive such payments, and the amount of compensation may vary by intermediary. In some cases, such payments may be made by or funded from the resources of companies affiliated with Touchstone Advisors. These payments are not reflected in the fees and expenses listed in the fee table sections of the Funds' Prospectus and described above because they are not paid by the Fund.

For more information on payment arrangements, please see the section entitled “The Advisor” in the SAI.
 
BUYING AND SELLING SHARES

Choosing the Appropriate Investments to Match Your Goals.  Investing well requires a plan.  We recommend that you meet with your financial advisor to plan a strategy that will best meet your financial goals.

Individual Shares

Shares of the Funds are listed for trading on a national securities exchange. Shares of the Dividend Select ETF (ticker: DVND) and the Strategic Income Opportunities ETF (ticker: SIO) are principally listed on NYSE Arca, Inc. ("NYSE Arca") and shares of US Large Cap Focused ETF (ticker: LCF) and the Ultra Short Income ETF (ticker: TUSI) are principally listed on Cboe BZX Exchange, Inc. ("Cboe BZX"). NYSE Arca and Cboe BZX are referred to individually as an "Exchange" and together as the "Exchanges".

Any amount of shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like shares of other publicly traded companies, and when you buy or sell a Fund’s shares in the secondary market, you will pay or receive the market price. However, there can be no guarantee that an active trading market will develop or be maintained, or that the Fund shares listing will continue or remain unchanged. Buying or selling a Fund’s shares involves certain costs that apply to all securities transactions. For example, when buying or selling shares of a Fund through a financial intermediary, you may incur a brokerage commission or other charges determined by your financial intermediary. The commission is frequently a fixed amount and may be a significant cost for investors seeking to buy or sell small amounts of shares. In addition, you may also incur the cost of the spread (the difference between the bid price (the price secondary market investors are willing to pay for shares) and the ask price (the price at which secondary market investors are willing to sell shares)). The spread varies over time for shares of a Fund based on its trading volume and market liquidity, and is generally less if a Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and more if a Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity.

Creations and Redemptions

Shares of the Funds may only be acquired through the Distributor and redeemed directly with the Fund by or through an Authorized Participant in Creation Units or multiples thereof. “Authorized Participants” are registered clearing agents that enter into an agreement with the Distributor to transact in Creation Units. Once created, shares of the Funds normally trade in the secondary market in amounts less than a Creation Unit. See the "Purchases and Redemptions" section of the SAI for more information on Creation Units.

The Funds are open on every “Business Day,” which is any day a Fund's respective Exchange is open. The Exchanges are open for trading Monday through Friday and are generally closed on the following holidays: New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King, Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Good Friday, Memorial Day, Juneteenth, Independence Day, Labor Day, Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day. On days when an Exchange closes earlier than normal, a Fund may require orders to create or redeem Creation Units to be placed earlier in the day. See the “Purchases and Redemptions” section of the SAI.

Purchases and redemptions of Creation Units will take place in-kind and/or for cash at the discretion of the Funds. The determination of whether purchases and redemptions of Creation Units will be for cash or in-kind depends primarily on the
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regulatory requirements and settlement mechanisms relevant to a Fund’s portfolio holdings and a Fund is not limited to engaging in in-kind transactions to any particular market circumstances. As further described in the SAI, Creation Units typically are issued on a two Business Days (“T+2”) basis after a purchase order has been received in good order and the transfer of good title to a Fund of any in-kind securities and/or cash required to purchase a Creation Unit have been completed (subject to certain exceptions). Similarly, and also as further described in the SAI, deliveries of redemption proceeds by the Fund generally will be made on a T+2 basis after a redemption order has been received in good order and the requisite number of Fund shares have been delivered (subject to certain exceptions). The Funds reserve the right to settle Creation Unit transactions on a basis other than T+2 in order to, among other matters, accommodate non-U.S. market holiday schedules, closures and settlement cycles, to account for different treatment among non-U.S. and U.S. markets of dividend record dates and ex-dividend dates (i.e., the last day the holder of a security can sell the security and still receive dividends payable on the security) and in certain other circumstances. The Funds may delay settlement for up to 15 days from the date an order has been submitted in good order and the requisite cash and/or assets delivered to the relevant Fund to accommodate foreign holidays, as further described in the SAI, and otherwise may delay redemptions up to seven days or longer as permitted by applicable law, regulations and interpretations, such as where unusual market conditions affect the NYSE Arca or Cboe BZX, as applicable, or an emergency exists which makes it impracticable for a Fund to dispose of or value securities it owns or a Fund has received an SEC exemptive order.

The Funds intend to comply with the U.S. federal securities laws in accepting securities for deposit and satisfying redemptions with redemption securities by, among other means, assuring that any securities accepted for deposit and any securities used to satisfy redemption requests will be sold in transactions that would be exempt from registration under the Securities Act of 1933, as amended (the "Securities Act"). Further, an Authorized Participant that is not a “qualified institutional buyer,” as such term is defined under Rule 144A of the Securities Act, will not be able to receive restricted securities eligible for resale under Rule 144A.

For more information on how to buy and sell shares of the Fund, contact Touchstone Investments at (833) 368-7383.

Share Trading Prices

The trading prices of a Fund’s shares listed on its Exchange may differ from a Fund’s daily NAV and will normally be affected by market forces, such as supply and demand, economic conditions, the market value of a Fund’s disclosed portfolio holdings and other factors. As a result, trading prices may be lower, higher or the same as a Fund’s NAV and investors may pay more than NAV when buying shares and receive less than NAV when selling shares through the Exchanges.

Book Entry

Shares of the Funds are held in book-entry form, which means that no stock certificates are issued. The Depository Trust Company (“DTC”) or its nominee is the record owner of all outstanding shares of the Funds and is recognized as the owner of all shares for all purposes.

Investors owning shares of the Funds are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for shares of the Fund. DTC participants include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants. These procedures are the same as those that apply to any other exchange-traded securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form.

Premium/Discount Information

The NAV of a Fund will fluctuate with changes in the market value of its portfolio holdings. The market price of a Fund will fluctuate in accordance with changes in its NAV, as well as market supply and demand.

There may be differences — premiums or discounts — between the daily market prices on secondary markets for shares of a Fund and a Fund’s NAV. NAV is the price per share at which a Fund issues and redeems its shares in transactions with APs. A Fund’s market price may be at, above or below its NAV. A premium is the amount that a Fund is trading above the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount is the amount that a Fund is trading below the reported NAV, expressed as a percentage of the NAV. A discount or premium could be significant. Information regarding a Fund’s NAV, market price and daily premiums or discounts can be found at TouchstoneInvestments.com/ETFs.

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Continuous Offering

The method by which Creation Units of Fund shares are created and traded may raise certain issues under applicable securities laws. Because new Creation Units of shares are issued and sold by a Fund on an ongoing basis, a “distribution,” as such term is used in the Securities Act, may occur at any point. Broker-dealers and other persons are cautioned that some activities on their part may, depending on the circumstances, result in their being deemed participants in a distribution in a manner which could render them statutory underwriters and subject them to the prospectus delivery requirement and liability provisions of the Securities Act.

For example, a broker-dealer firm or its client may be deemed a statutory underwriter if it takes Creation Units after placing an order with the Distributor, breaks them down into constituent shares and sells the shares directly to customers or if it chooses to couple the creation of a supply of new shares with an active selling effort involving solicitation of secondary market demand for shares. A determination of whether one is an underwriter for purposes of the Securities Act must take into account all the facts and circumstances pertaining to the activities of the broker-dealer or its client in the particular case, and the examples mentioned above should not be considered a complete description of all the activities that could lead to a characterization as an underwriter.

Broker-dealer firms should also note that dealers who are not “underwriters” but are effecting transactions in shares, whether or not participating in the distribution of shares, are generally required to deliver a prospectus. This is because the prospectus delivery exemption in Section 4(3) of the Securities Act is not available in respect of such transactions as a result of Section 24(d) of the 1940 Act. As a result, broker-dealer firms should note that dealers who are not “underwriters” but are participating in a distribution (as contrasted with engaging in ordinary secondary market transactions) and thus dealing with the shares that are part of an overallotment within the meaning of Section 4(3)(C) of the Securities Act, will be unable to take advantage of the prospectus delivery exemption provided by Section 4(3) of the Securities Act. For delivery of prospectuses to exchange members, the prospectus delivery mechanism of Rule 153 under the Securities Act is only available with respect to transactions on a national exchange.

Dealers effecting transactions in a Fund’s shares, whether or not participating in this distribution, are generally required to deliver a prospectus. This is in addition to any obligation of dealers to deliver a prospectus when acting as underwriters.

DISTRIBUTIONS AND TAXES
 
The Funds intend to distribute to their shareholders substantially all of their net investment income and capital gains. Dividends, if any, of net investment income are declared and paid annually by the US Large Cap Focused ETF, quarterly by the Dividend Select ETF and monthly by both the Strategic Income Opportunities ETF and the Ultra Short Income ETF. Each Fund makes distributions of capital gains, if any, at least annually.  If you own shares on a Fund’s distribution record date, you will be entitled to receive the distribution. Dividend payments are made through DTC participants and indirect participants to beneficial owners then of record with proceeds received from a Fund.

No dividend reinvestment service is provided by the Trust. Financial intermediaries may make available the DTC book-entry Dividend Reinvestment Service for use by beneficial owners of Fund shares for reinvestment of their dividend distributions. Beneficial owners should contact their financial intermediary to determine the availability and costs of the service and the details of participation therein. Financial intermediaries may require beneficial owners to adhere to specific procedures and timetables. If this service is available and used, dividend distributions of both income and net capital gains will be automatically reinvested in additional whole shares of the Fund purchased in the secondary market.
 
A Fund’s dividends and other distributions are taxable to shareholders (other than retirement plans and other tax-exempt investors) whether received in cash or reinvested in additional shares of the Fund.  A dividend or distribution paid by a Fund has the effect of reducing the NAV per share on the ex-dividend date by the amount of the dividend or distribution.  A dividend or distribution declared shortly after a purchase of shares by an investor would, therefore, represent, in substance, a return of capital to the shareholder with respect to such shares even though it would be subject to federal income taxes.
 
For most shareholders, a statement will be sent to you within 45 days after the end of each year detailing the federal income tax status of your distributions.  Please see “Federal Income Tax Information” below for more information on the federal income tax consequences of dividends and other distributions made by a Fund.
 
Federal Income Tax Information
 
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The tax information in this prospectus is provided only for general information purposes for U.S. taxpayers and should not be considered as tax advice or relied on by a shareholder or prospective investor.

General. The Funds intend to qualify annually to be treated as RICs under Subchapter M of Chapter 1, Subtitle A of the Code.  As such, the Funds will not be subject to federal income taxes on the earnings they distribute to shareholders provided they satisfy certain requirements and restrictions of the Code, one of which is to distribute to a Fund’s shareholders substantially all of the Fund’s net investment income and net short-term capital gains each year.  If for any taxable year a Fund fails to qualify as a RIC: (1) it will be subject to tax in the same manner as an ordinary corporation and thus will be subject to federal income tax at the corporate tax rate; and (2) distributions from its earnings and profits (as determined under federal income tax principles) will be taxable as ordinary dividend income and generally eligible for the dividends-received deduction for corporate shareholders and for “qualified dividend income” treatment for non-corporate shareholders. In addition, the Fund could be required to recognize unrealized gains, pay substantial taxes and interest and make substantial distributions before requalifying for RIC treatment.

Taxes on Creations and Redemptions of Creation Units. A person who purchases a Creation Unit by exchanging securities in-kind generally will recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between (i) the sum of the market value of the Creation Units at the time of the exchange and any net amount of cash received by the Authorized Participant in the exchange and (ii) the sum of the purchaser’s aggregate basis in the securities surrendered and any net amount of cash paid for the Creation Units. A person who redeems Creation Units and receives securities in-kind from a Fund will generally recognize a gain or loss equal to the difference between the redeemer’s basis in the Creation Units, and the aggregate market value of the securities received and any net cash received. The IRS, however, may assert that a loss realized upon an in-kind exchange of securities for Creation Units or an exchange of Creation Units for securities cannot be deducted currently under the rules governing “wash sales,” or on the basis that there has been no significant change in economic position. Persons effecting in-kind creations or redemptions should consult their own tax adviser with respect to these matters. The Funds have the right to reject an order for Creation Units if the purchaser (or a group of purchasers) would, upon obtaining the Fund shares so ordered, own 80% or more of the outstanding shares of a Fund and if, pursuant to section 351 of the Code, a Fund would have a basis in the deposit securities different from the market value of such securities on the date of deposit. The Funds also have the right to require information necessary to determine beneficial share ownership for purposes of the 80% determinations.
 
Distributions. The Funds will make distributions to you that may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains.  The dividends and distributions you receive may be subject to federal, foreign, state and local taxation, depending upon your tax situation.  Distributions are taxable whether you reinvest such distributions in additional shares of the Fund or choose to receive cash.  Taxable Fund distributions are taxable to a shareholder even if the distributions are paid from income or gains earned by a Fund prior to the shareholder’s investment and, thus, were included in the price the shareholder paid for the shares. For example, a shareholder who purchases shares on or just before the record date of a Fund distribution will pay full price for the shares and may receive a portion of the investment back as a taxable distribution. Distributions declared by a Fund during October, November or December to shareholders of record during such month and paid by January 31 of the following year are treated for federal income tax purposes as if received by shareholders and paid by the Fund on December 31 of the year in which the distribution was declared.
 
Ordinary Income. Net investment income, except for qualified dividend income and income designated as tax-exempt, and short-term capital gains that are distributed to you are taxable as ordinary income for federal income tax purposes regardless of how long you have held your Fund shares.  Certain dividends distributed to non-corporate shareholders and designated by a Fund as “qualified dividend income” are eligible for the long-term capital gains rate, provided certain holding period and other requirements are satisfied.
 
Net Capital Gains. Net capital gains (i.e., the excess of net long-term capital gains over net short-term capital losses) distributed to you, if any, are taxable as long-term capital gains for federal income tax purposes regardless of how long you have held your Fund shares.
 
Returns of Capital. If a Fund makes a distribution in excess of its current and accumulated earnings and profits, the excess will be treated as a return of capital to the extent of a shareholder’s basis in his or her shares, and thereafter as capital gain.  A return of capital is not taxable, but it reduces a shareholder’s basis in his or her shares, thus reducing any loss or increasing any gain on a subsequent taxable disposition by the shareholder of such shares.
 
Backup Withholding. A Fund (or a financial intermediary, such as a broker, through which a shareholder holds Fund shares) may be required to withhold U.S. federal income tax on all distributions and sales proceeds payable to shareholders who fail to provide their correct taxpayer identification number or to make required certifications, or who have been notified by the Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) that they are subject to backup withholding.
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Medicare Tax.  An additional 3.8% Medicare tax is imposed on certain net investment income (including dividends and distributions received from a Fund and net gains from redemptions or other taxable dispositions of Fund shares) of U.S. individuals, estates and trusts to the extent that such person’s “modified adjusted gross income” (in the case of an individual) or “adjusted gross income” (in the case of an estate or trust) exceeds a threshold amount.
 
Foreign Taxes.  Income received by a Fund or underlying fund from sources within foreign countries may be subject to foreign withholding and other taxes.  If a Fund qualifies (by having more than 50% of the value of its total assets at the close of the taxable year consist of stock or securities in foreign corporations or by being a qualified fund of funds) and elects to pass through foreign taxes paid on its investments during the year, such taxes will be reported to you as income. You may, however, be able to claim an offsetting tax credit or deduction on your federal income tax return, depending on your particular circumstances and provided you meet certain holding period and other requirements. Tax-exempt holders of Fund shares, such as qualified tax-advantaged retirement plans, will not benefit from such a deduction or credit.
 
Non-U.S. Shareholders.  Non-U.S. shareholders may be subject to U.S. tax as a result of an investment in a Fund.  This prospectus does not discuss the U.S. or foreign tax consequences of an investment by a non-U.S. shareholder in a Fund. Accordingly, non-U.S. shareholders are advised to consult their own tax advisors as to the U.S. and foreign tax consequences of an investment in a Fund.
 
Statements and Notices. You will receive an annual statement outlining the tax status of your distributions.  You may also receive written notices of certain foreign taxes paid by a Fund during the prior taxable year.
 
Important Tax Reporting Considerations. The Funds or brokers are required to report cost basis and holding period information to both the IRS and shareholders for gross proceeds from the sales of Fund shares purchased on or after January 1, 2012 ("covered shares").  This information is reported on Form 1099-B. Please consult your tax adviser for additional information regarding cost basis reporting and your situation.
 
This section is only a summary of some important federal income tax considerations that may affect your investment in a Fund.  More information regarding these considerations is included in the Funds’ SAI.  You are urged and advised to consult your own tax advisor regarding the effects of an investment in a Fund on your tax situation, including the application of foreign, state, local and other tax laws to your particular situation.

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FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS

Since the Funds had not commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus, financial highlights are not included in this prospectus.
 


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TOUCHSTONE INVESTMENTS*

INVESTMENT ADVISOR
Touchstone Advisors, Inc.*
303 Broadway, Suite 1100
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202-4203

DISTRIBUTOR
Foreside Fund Services, LLC
Three Canal Plaza, Suite 100
Portland, Maine 04101

TRANSFER AGENT
The Bank of New York Mellon
6023 Airport Road
Oriskany, New York 13424

*A Member of Western & Southern Financial Group
The following are federal trademark registrations and applications owned by either IFS Financial Services, Inc. or Touchstone Advisors, Inc., each a member of Western & Southern Financial Group: Touchstone, Touchstone Funds, Touchstone Investments, the Touchstone Family of Funds, and Distinctively Active.


















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303 Broadway, Suite 1100
Cincinnati, Ohio 45202-4203
(833) 368-7383

For investors who want more information about the Funds, the following documents are available free upon request:
Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”): The SAI provides more detailed information about the Funds and is incorporated herein by reference, which means it is legally a part of this prospectus.
Annual/Semiannual Reports (“Financial Reports”): The Funds’ Financial Reports, when available, will provide additional information about a Fund’s investments. In the annual report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected a Fund’s performance during its most recent fiscal year.
You can get free copies of the SAI, the Financial Reports, other information and answers to your questions about the Funds by contacting your financial advisor or by contacting Touchstone Investments at (833) 368-7383.  The SAI and Financial Reports are also available on the Touchstone Investments website at: TouchstoneInvestments.com/Resources.
Reports and other information about the Funds are available on the EDGAR database of the SEC’s internet site at http://www.sec.gov.  You may obtain copies of these reports and other information after paying a duplicating fee, by sending an e-mail request to: [email protected].

Investment Company Act File No. 811-23789     












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