HARTFORD MUTUAL FUNDS INC/CT
Hartford International/Global Equity Funds
Prospectus
March 1, 2023
Class A
Class C
Class I
Class R3
Class R4
Class R5
Class R6
Class Y
Class F
Hartford Climate Opportunities
Fund
HEOMX
HEONX
HEOIX
HEORX
HEOSX
HEOTX
HEOVX
HEOYX
HEOFX
Hartford Emerging Markets
Equity Fund
HERAX
HERCX
HERIX
HERRX
HERSX
HERTX
HERVX
HERYX
HERFX
Hartford Global Impact Fund
HGXAX
HGXCX
HGXIX
HGXRX
HGXSX
HGXTX
HGXVX
HGXYX
HGXFX
Hartford International Equity
Fund*
HDVAX
HDVCX
HDVIX
HDVRX
HDVSX
HDVTX
HDVVX
HDVYX
HDVFX
The Hartford International
Growth Fund
HNCAX
HNCCX
HNCJX
HNCRX
HNCSX
HNCTX
HNCUX
HNCYX
HNCFX
The Hartford International
Opportunities Fund
IHOAX
HIOCX
IHOIX
IHORX
IHOSX
IHOTX
IHOVX
HAOYX
IHOFX
The Hartford International Value
Fund
HILAX
HILCX
HILIX
HILRX
HILSX
HILTX
HILUX
HILYX
HILDX
*Classes A, C, and I of the Fund are closed to new investors. No purchases of a closed share class are allowed, other than as described in this Prospectus.
As with all mutual funds, the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Commodity Futures Trading Commission have not approved or disapproved these securities or passed upon the adequacy of this Prospectus. Any representation to the contrary is a criminal offense. Mutual funds are not bank deposits and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. Because you could lose money by investing in the Funds, be sure to read all risk disclosures carefully before investing.

Contents
3
10
16
22
28
34
40
46
53
71
72
76
83
95
98
101
102
110
A-1

Hartford Climate Opportunities Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 79 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Other expenses
0.34%
0.38%
0.32%
0.41%
0.36%
0.31%
0.20%
0.30%
0.19%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.21%
2.00%
0.94%
1.53%
1.23%
0.93%
0.82%
0.92%
0.81%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(2)
0.02%
0.06%
0.05%
0.12%
0.12%
0.12%
0.13%
0.13%
0.12%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(2)
1.19%
1.94%
0.89%
1.41%
1.11%
0.81%
0.69%
0.79%
0.69%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
(2)
Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (the “Investment Manager”) has contractually agreed to reimburse expenses (exclusive of taxes, interest expenses, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses and extraordinary expenses) to the extent necessary to limit total annual fund operating expenses as follows: 1.19% (Class A), 1.94% (Class C), 0.89% (Class I), 1.41% (Class R3), 1.11% (Class R4), 0.81% (Class R5), 0.69% (Class R6), 0.79% (Class Y), and 0.69% (Class F). This contractual arrangement will remain in effect until February 29, 2024 unless the Board of Directors of The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc. approves its earlier termination.
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the example reflects the fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement arrangement reflected in the table above for only the first year)
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
3

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$665
$911
$1,177
$1,934
C
$297
$622
$1,072
$2,322
I
$91
$295
$515
$1,150
R3
$144
$472
$823
$1,813
R4
$113
$378
$664
$1,478
R5
$83
$284
$503
$1,132
R6
$70
$249
$442
$1,001
Y
$81
$280
$497
$1,119
F
$70
$247
$438
$991
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$197
$622
$1,072
$2,322
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 71% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its objective by investing in securities of U.S. and foreign issuers, including non-dollar securities and securities of emerging market issuers. The Fund may invest in common and preferred stocks, convertible securities and warrants of companies of any market capitalization. The Fund focuses its investments on equity securities and equity related investments. Under normal market conditions, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in securities of issuers that seek opportunities to address or benefit from climate change, which include but are not limited to companies classified as promoting clean and/or efficient energy, sustainable transportation, water and/or resource management, companies exhibiting low-carbon leadership and businesses that service such companies. The Fund employs a “multi-manager” approach whereby portions of the Fund’s assets are allocated among sub-advisers. Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (the “Investment Manager”) is responsible for the management of the Fund and supervision of the Fund’s sub-advisers: Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), and Schroders, comprised of Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. (“SIMNA”) and Schroder Investment Management North America Limited (“SIMNA Ltd.,” together with SIMNA, “Schroders”). Each sub-adviser manages its segment of the Fund’s assets to correspond with its distinct investment style and strategy, as described below, in a manner consistent with the Fund’s investment objective, strategies, and restrictions. The Investment Manager may allocate assets from or towards each sub-adviser from time to time and may reallocate assets between the sub-advisers. Wellington Management and Schroders act independently of each other and each uses its own methodology for selecting investments. The Fund generally does not invest in major fossil fuel companies.
Wellington Management: For its portion of the Fund, Wellington Management uses fundamental research, bottom-up approach and analysis to identify companies it believes represent attractive investments and also address climate challenges and/or seek to improve the efficiency of resource consumption. In doing so, Wellington Management invests the Fund’s assets in companies engaged in climate mitigation or adaptation solutions across the following categories, which could change over time: low carbon electricity, energy efficiency, low carbon transportation, water and resource management, and/or climate resilient infrastructure, or otherwise involved in seeking to address climate mitigation or adaptation. Companies offering climate mitigation or adaptation solutions are not necessarily low carbon emitters. Although Wellington Management may invest the Fund’s assets across different sectors and countries, including emerging market issuers, and has no limit on the amount it may invest in any single sector or country, it generally can be expected to emphasize investments in the utilities and industrial sectors, as these sectors tend to include companies that address climate mitigation and adaptation and/or seek to improve the efficiency of resource consumption. The Fund may invest in securities of issuers of any market capitalization, including mid- capitalization and small-capitalization securities. In addition to its focus on climate stewardship, Wellington Management also integrates the evaluation of environmental, social and/or governance (“ESG”) characteristics (where available for a company) into its fundamental analysis. ESG characteristics are one of several factors that contribute to Wellington Management’s overall evaluation of the risk and return potential of a company.
4

Schroders: For its portion of the Fund, Schroders seeks to exploit opportunities in the securities of companies that it believes have already recognized threats posed by climate change and are embracing these challenges ahead of their peers, companies that form part of the solution to problems arising from climate change or companies that seek to benefit from efforts to accommodate or limit the impact of global climate change. These companies can typically be classified as contributing to one or more themes related to climate change, including clean energy, energy efficiency, environmental resources, sustainable transportation, and low carbon leaders. Schroders currently considers a company to be a low carbon leader if such company has a low carbon cost structure relative to peers or if such company’s products/services/corporate cultures promote new, low carbon business models. Schroders relies on a fundamental, research-driven, bottom-up approach to identify issuers it believes will benefit from efforts to accommodate or limit the impact of global climate change and have the potential for capital growth. Schroders considers factors such as a company’s potential for above average earnings growth, a security’s attractive relative valuation, and whether a company has proprietary advantages. In addition, Schroders integrates ESG characteristics (where available for an issuer) into their investment process. ESG characteristics are one of several factors that contribute to Schroders overall evaluation of the risk and return potential of an investment. Although Schroders may invest the Fund’s assets across different sectors and countries, including emerging markets, and has no limit on the amount it may invest in any single sector or country, it generally can be expected to emphasize investments in the industrial sector, as this sector tends to include companies that are beneficiaries of efforts to mitigate or adapt to the impact of climate change.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Multi-Manager Risk –  The Fund’s performance depends on the ability of the Investment Manager in selecting, overseeing, and allocating Fund assets to the sub-advisers. The sub-advisers’ investment styles may not be complementary. Wellington Management and Schroders make investment decisions independently of one another, and may make decisions that conflict with each other. For example, it is possible that one sub-adviser may purchase an investment for the Fund at the same time that the other sub-adviser sells the same investment, resulting in higher expenses without accomplishing any net investment result; or that the sub-advisers purchase the same investment at the same time, without aggregating their transactions, resulting in higher expenses. Moreover, the Fund’s multi-manager approach may result in the Fund investing a significant percentage of its assets in certain types of investments, which could be beneficial or detrimental to the Fund’s performance depending on the performance of those investments and the overall market environment.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-advisers’ investment strategies do not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although each sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Mid Cap and Small Cap Securities Risk –  Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than investments in larger, more established companies. Many of these companies are young and have limited operating or business history. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks, including the risk of bankruptcy.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
5

Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Climate Change Investment Focus Risk –  The Fund’s focus on securities of issuers that seek opportunities to address or benefit from climate change may affect the Fund’s exposure to certain sectors or types of investments. The Fund’s relative investment performance may also be impacted depending on whether such sectors or investments are in or out of favor with the market. Certain investments may be dependent on U.S. and foreign government policies, including tax incentives and subsidies, as well as on political support for certain environmental initiatives and developments affecting companies focused on sustainable energy and climate change solutions generally. In addition, under certain market conditions, the Fund may underperform funds that invest in a broader array of investments. The Fund’s exclusion of investments in companies with significant fossil fuel exposure, in particular, may adversely affect the Fund’s relative performance at times when such investments are performing well.
Sector Risk –  The Fund’s investments may be focused in securities of companies in the utilities and industrials sectors of the securities markets, which may cause the Fund’s performance to be sensitive to developments affecting those sectors generally or companies in those sectors.
Volatility Risk –  The Fund’s investments may fluctuate in value over a short period of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant changes in value over short periods of time.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Regional/Country Focus Risk –  To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular geographic region or country, the Fund may be subject to increased currency, political, regulatory, economic and other risks associated with that region or country. A natural or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region. As a result, the Fund may be subject to greater price volatility and risk of loss than a fund holding more geographically diverse investments.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent
6

that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.
Prior to November 8, 2019, reflect when the Fund pursued a modified strategy and Wellington Management served as the sole sub-adviser.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Returns do not include sales charges. If sales charges were reflected, returns would have been lower
Shows the returns of Class A shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year (excludes sales charges)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
24.89%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-21.33%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. After-tax returns, which are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes, are shown only for Class A shares and will vary for other classes. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
7

Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022 (including sales charges)
 
 
Since Inception
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
(2/29/2016)
Class A –  Return Before Taxes
-23.05%
6.29%
9.89%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions
-23.19%
4.99%
8.42%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-13.55%
4.61%
7.55%
Share Classes (Return Before Taxes)
 
 
 
Class C
-20.00%
7.02%
10.33%
Class I
-18.36%
7.83%
11.12%
Class R3
-18.74%
7.78%
10.96%
Class R4
-18.42%
7.71%
10.96%
Class R5
-18.30%
7.86%
11.13%
Class R6
-18.23%
7.99%
11.25%
Class Y
-18.29%
7.90%
11.19%
Class F*
-18.18%
7.96%
11.23%
MSCI ACWI Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes but
reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
-18.36%
5.23%
9.40%
*
Class F shares commenced operations on February 28, 2017 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class I shares. Performance prior to an inception date of a class has not been adjusted to reflect the operating expenses of such class.
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-advisers are Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”) and Schroder Investment Management North America Inc. (“SIMNA”). The Fund’s sub-sub-adviser is Schroder Investment Management North America Limited (“SIMNA Ltd.,” together with SIMNA, “Schroders”).
Sub-Advisers
Portfolio Managers
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Wellington Management
Alan Hsu
Managing Director, Global Industry Analyst, and
Equity Portfolio Manager
2016
G. Thomas Levering
Senior Managing Director and Global Industry
Analyst
2016
Schroders
Simon Webber, CFA
Portfolio Manager
2019
 
Isabella Hervey-Bathurst
Portfolio Manager
2021
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Not all share classes are available for all investors. Minimum investment amounts may be waived for certain accounts. Certain financial intermediaries may impose different restrictions than those described below.
Share Classes
Minimum Initial Investment
Minimum
Subsequent
Investment
Class A, Class C and Class I
$2,000 for all accounts except: $250, if establishing an Automatic
Investment Plan (“AIP”), with recurring monthly investments of at
least $50
$50
Class R3, Class R4, Class R5 and Class R6
No minimum initial investment
None
Class Y
$250,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
Class F
$1,000,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
For more information, please see the “How To Buy And Sell Shares” section of the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
8

You may sell your shares of the Fund on those days when the New York Stock Exchange is open, typically Monday through Friday. You may sell your shares through your financial intermediary. With respect to certain accounts, you may sell your shares on the web at hartfordfunds.com, by phone by calling 1-888-843-7824, by electronic funds transfer, or by wire. In certain circumstances you will need to write to Hartford Funds to request to sell your shares. For regular mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, P.O. Box 219060, Kansas City, MO 64121-9060. For overnight mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, 430 W 7th Street, Suite 219060, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial professional), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
9

Hartford Emerging Markets Equity Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 79 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
0.90%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Other expenses
0.34%
0.39%
0.26%
0.36%
0.31%
0.26%
0.15%
0.25%
0.14%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.49%
2.29%
1.16%
1.76%
1.46%
1.16%
1.05%
1.15%
1.04%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(2)
0.04%
0.09%
0.00%
0.06%
0.01%
0.01%
0.07%
0.05%
0.06%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(2)
1.45%
2.20%
1.16%
1.70%
1.45%
1.15%
0.98%
1.10%
0.98%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
(2)
Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (the “Investment Manager”) has contractually agreed to reimburse expenses (exclusive of taxes, interest expenses, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses and extraordinary expenses) to the extent necessary to limit total annual fund operating expenses as follows: 1.45% (Class A), 2.20% (Class C), 1.20% (Class I), 1.70% (Class R3), 1.45% (Class R4), 1.15% (Class R5), 0.98% (Class R6), 1.10% (Class Y), and 0.98% (Class F). This contractual arrangement will remain in effect until February 29, 2024 unless the Board of Directors of The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc. approves its earlier termination.
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the example reflects the fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement arrangement reflected in the table above for only the first year)
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
10

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$689
$991
$1,315
$2,228
C
$323
$707
$1,217
$2,619
I
$118
$368
$638
$1,409
R3
$173
$548
$949
$2,068
R4
$148
$461
$796
$1,745
R5
$117
$367
$637
$1,408
R6
$100
$327
$573
$1,276
Y
$112
$360
$628
$1,393
F
$100
$325
$568
$1,266
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$223
$707
$1,217
$2,619
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 79% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in equity securities of companies in emerging markets. The sub-adviser, Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), uses a quantitative multifactor approach to bottom-up stock selection, using a broad set of individual fundamental stock characteristics to model each stock’s relative attractiveness, with a focus on those factors that have been demonstrated historically to drive market returns. The Fund will typically seek to be broadly diversified across countries, sectors and industries represented in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index, although the extent of that representation may vary. The Fund has no limit on the amount of assets that may be invested in an emerging market country, including China. Securities in which the Fund invests are denominated in both U.S. dollars and foreign currencies and may trade in both U.S. and foreign markets. The Fund will invest in securities of companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. Emerging markets are those markets (1) included in emerging market or equivalent classifications by the United Nations (and its agencies); (2) having per capita income in the low to middle ranges, as determined by the World Bank; or (3) the Fund’s benchmark index provider designates as emerging. The Fund may invest in securities of foreign issuers in the form of depositary receipts or other securities that are convertible into securities of foreign issuers. The Fund may invest in opportunities across the market capitalization spectrum. The Fund may trade securities actively.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
11

Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Depositary Receipts Risk –  The Fund may invest in securities of foreign issuers in the form of depositary receipts or other securities that are convertible into securities of foreign issuers, including depositary receipts that are not sponsored by a financial institution (“Unsponsored Depositary Receipts”). Depositary receipts are generally subject to the same risks as the foreign securities that they evidence or into which they may be converted. Unsponsored Depositary Receipts are also subject to the risk that there may be less information available regarding their issuers and there may not be a correlation between such information and the market value of the depositary receipts.
Regional/Country Focus Risk –  To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular geographic region or country, the Fund may be subject to increased currency, political, regulatory, economic and other risks associated with that region or country. A natural or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region. As a result, the Fund may be subject to greater price volatility and risk of loss than a fund holding more geographically diverse investments.
China Investments Risk –  China is an emerging market and has demonstrated significantly higher volatility from time to time in comparison to developed markets. Investments in Chinese securities, including certain Hong Kong-listed and U.S.-listed securities, subject the Fund to risks specific to China. These risks include: (i) the risk of more frequent (and potentially widespread) trading suspensions and government interventions with respect to Chinese issuers, resulting in liquidity risk, price volatility, greater market execution risk, and valuation risk; (ii) the risk of currency fluctuations, currency non-convertibility, currency revaluations and other currency exchange rate fluctuations or blockage; (iii) the risk of intervention by the Chinese government in the Chinese securities markets; (iv) the risk of nationalization or expropriation of assets; (v) the risk that the Chinese government may decide not to continue to support economic reform programs; (vi) the risk of limitations on the use of brokers; (vii) the risk of interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation; (viii) the risk that the U.S. government or other governments may sanction Chinese issuers or otherwise prohibit U.S. persons (such as the Fund) from investing in certain Chinese issuers; and (ix) the risk of market volatility caused by any potential regional or territorial conflicts, including military conflicts, or natural or other disasters. Recent developments in relations between the United States and China have heightened concerns of increased tariffs and restrictions on trade between the two countries. It is unclear whether further tariffs and sanctions may be imposed or other escalating actions may be taken in the future, which could negatively impact the Fund. In addition, China is alleged to have participated in state-sponsored cyberattacks against foreign companies and foreign governments. Actual and threatened responses to such activity and strained international relations, including purchasing restrictions, sanctions, tariffs or cyberattacks on the Chinese government or Chinese companies, may impact China’s economy and Chinese issuers of securities in which the Fund invests. As a result of different legal standards, the Fund faces the risk of being unable to enforce its rights with respect to holdings in Chinese securities and the information about the Chinese securities in which the Fund invests may be less reliable or complete. Chinese companies with securities listed on U.S. exchanges may be delisted if they do not meet U.S. accounting standards and auditor oversight requirements, which could significantly decrease the liquidity and value of the securities.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
12

Mid Cap and Small Cap Securities Risk –  Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than investments in larger, more established companies. Many of these companies are young and have limited operating or business history. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks, including the risk of bankruptcy.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Quantitative Investing Risk –  The value of securities or other investments selected using quantitative analysis can perform differently from the market as a whole or from their expected performance. This may be as a result of the factors used in building the quantitative analytical framework, the weights placed on each factor, the accuracy of historical data supplied by third parties, and changing sources of market returns.
Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may adversely affect Fund performance.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
Volatility Risk –  The Fund’s investments may fluctuate in value over a short period of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant changes in value over short periods of time.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect the Fund’s performance when the Fund pursued a modified investment strategy prior to May 7, 2015
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.
13

The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Returns do not include sales charges. If sales charges were reflected, returns would have been lower
Shows the returns of Class A shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year (excludes sales charges)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
17.71%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-25.69%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. After-tax returns, which are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes, are shown only for Class A shares and will vary for other classes. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022 (including sales charges)
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class A –  Return Before Taxes
-26.25%
-3.51%
0.87%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions
-26.68%
-3.76%
0.48%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-14.96%
-2.40%
0.85%
Share Classes (Return Before Taxes)
 
 
 
Class C
-23.24%
-3.18%
0.69%
Class I
-21.73%
-2.11%
1.80%
Class R3
-22.12%
-2.69%
1.19%
Class R4
-21.99%
-2.40%
1.47%
Class R5
-21.78%
-2.19%
1.70%
Class R6*
-21.57%
-1.96%
1.91%
Class Y
-21.71%
-2.09%
1.84%
Class F*
-21.62%
-2.00%
1.87%
MSCI Emerging Markets Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes
but reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
-20.09%
-1.40%
1.44%
*
Class R6 shares commenced operations on February 28, 2018 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class Y shares. Class F shares commenced operations on February 28, 2017 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class I shares. Performance prior to an inception date of a class has not been adjusted to reflect the operating expenses of such class.
14

MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
David J. Elliott, CFA
Senior Managing Director, Co-Director of Quantitative Investments, and Director of
Quantitative Portfolio Management
2015
Mark A. Yarger, CFA
Managing Director and Quantitative Analyst
2015
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Not all share classes are available for all investors. Minimum investment amounts may be waived for certain accounts. Certain financial intermediaries may impose different restrictions than those described below.
Share Classes
Minimum Initial Investment
Minimum
Subsequent
Investment
Class A, Class C and Class I
$2,000 for all accounts except: $250, if establishing an Automatic
Investment Plan (“AIP”), with recurring monthly investments of at
least $50
$50
Class R3, Class R4, Class R5 and Class R6
No minimum initial investment
None
Class Y
$250,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
Class F
$1,000,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
For more information, please see the “How To Buy And Sell Shares” section of the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
You may sell your shares of the Fund on those days when the New York Stock Exchange is open, typically Monday through Friday. You may sell your shares through your financial intermediary. With respect to certain accounts, you may sell your shares on the web at hartfordfunds.com, by phone by calling 1-888-843-7824, by electronic funds transfer, or by wire. In certain circumstances you will need to write to Hartford Funds to request to sell your shares. For regular mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, P.O. Box 219060, Kansas City, MO 64121-9060. For overnight mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, 430 W 7th Street, Suite 219060, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial professional), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
15

Hartford Global Impact Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 79 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
0.62%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Other expenses
0.39%
0.41%
0.27%
0.38%
0.30%
0.28%
0.16%
0.27%
0.16%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.26%
2.03%
0.89%
1.50%
1.17%
0.90%
0.78%
0.89%
0.78%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(2)
0.07%
0.09%
0.00%
0.09%
0.06%
0.09%
0.09%
0.10%
0.09%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(2)
1.19%
1.94%
0.89%
1.41%
1.11%
0.81%
0.69%
0.79%
0.69%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
(2)
Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (the “Investment Manager”) has contractually agreed to reimburse expenses (exclusive of taxes, interest expenses, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses and extraordinary expenses) to the extent necessary to limit total annual fund operating expenses as follows: 1.19% (Class A), 1.94% (Class C), 0.89% (Class I), 1.41% (Class R3), 1.11% (Class R4), 0.81% (Class R5), 0.69% (Class R6), 0.79% (Class Y), and 0.69% (Class F). This contractual arrangement will remain in effect until February 29, 2024 unless the Board of Directors of The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc. approves its earlier termination.
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the example reflects the fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement arrangement reflected in the table above for only the first year)
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
16

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$665
$921
$1,197
$1,983
C
$297
$628
$1,085
$2,351
I
$91
$284
$493
$1,096
R3
$144
$465
$810
$1,783
R4
$113
$366
$638
$1,415
R5
$83
$278
$490
$1,100
R6
$70
$240
$424
$958
Y
$81
$274
$483
$1,087
F
$70
$240
$424
$958
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$197
$628
$1,085
$2,351
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 31% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its objective by investing in equity securities of issuers located throughout the world, including non-dollar securities and securities of emerging market issuers. The Fund will normally invest at least 80% of its assets in securities of issuers that Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, determines meet its impact investing criteria.
For purposes of determining which companies meet its impact investing criteria, Wellington Management uses its proprietary research to identify companies that focus their core goods and services in areas that it believes are likely to address major social and environmental challenges. Wellington Management focuses on three broad impact areas: life essentials; human empowerment; and the environment. Wellington Management then targets specific themes that fit within this impact investing criteria. The impact themes align with many of the UN’s Sustainable Development Goals. As of March 1, 2023, these impact themes include sustainable agriculture and nutrition, health, clean water and sanitation, affordable housing, education and job training, financial inclusion, narrowing the digital divide, safety and security, alternative energy, resource stewardship, and resource efficiency. These areas are subject to change without notice to shareholders. Within this universe of companies, Wellington Management conducts fundamental analysis to identify what it believes to be attractive investments across economic sectors within both developed and emerging countries. As part of its fundamental analysis, Wellington Management may evaluate, for example, a company’s industry structure, asset quality, business environment, management quality, balance sheet, income statement, anticipated earnings, growth prospects, revenues and dividends, and other related measures or indicators of value. In addition to its focus on impact investing, Wellington Management also integrates the evaluation of environmental, social, and/or governance (“ESG”) characteristics (where available for a company) into its fundamental analysis. ESG characteristics are one of several factors that contribute to Wellington Management’s overall evaluation of the risk and return potential of a company.
In addition to identifying investment opportunities through bottom-up fundamental research, Wellington Management generally excludes companies from the Fund’s investment universe that it determines to be primarily engaged in the following businesses: tobacco, firearms, defense, nuclear, coal, petroleum, alcohol, adult entertainment and gambling. Wellington Management believes that investment in such companies does not align with its impact investing criteria. These exclusions may be updated periodically by Wellington Management to, among other things, add or remove exclusion categories.
The Fund may invest in companies of any market capitalization, including small and mid capitalization securities, located anywhere in the world, including the United States. Although the Fund has no limit on the amount it may invest in any single sector, it generally can be expected to emphasize investments in the health care and information technology sectors, as these sectors tend to include companies that address major social and/or environmental challenges. The Fund may also invest in depositary receipts or other securities that are convertible into securities of foreign issuers and could, at times hold a portion of its assets in cash. Under normal circumstances, the Fund will invest at least 40% of its net assets in foreign securities or derivative instruments or other investments with exposure to
17

foreign securities of at least three different countries outside the United States. During periods of unfavorable market conditions, the Fund may reduce its exposure to foreign securities, but typically will continue to invest at least 30% of its net assets in foreign securities as described above. Investments are deemed to be “foreign” if: (a) an issuer’s domicile or location of headquarters is in a foreign country; (b) an issuer derives a significant proportion (at least 50%) of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in a foreign country or has at least 50% of its assets situated in a foreign country; (c) the principal trading market for a security is located in a foreign country; or (d) it is a foreign currency.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Mid Cap and Small Cap Securities Risk –  Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than investments in larger, more established companies. Many of these companies are young and have limited operating or business history. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks, including the risk of bankruptcy.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Impact Investing Risk –  The Fund’s impact investing focus may affect the Fund’s exposure to certain companies or industries and the Fund may forego certain investment opportunities. The Fund’s relative investment performance may also be impacted depending on whether such investments are in or out of favor with the market. The Fund may underperform other funds that do not seek to invest in companies based on impact investing criteria. Certain
18

companies focused on sustainable energy and climate change solutions may be dependent on, and significantly affected by, developing technologies, short product life cycles, competition from new market entrants, fluctuations in energy prices and supply and demand of alternative energy sources. These companies also may be dependent on the government policies of U.S. and foreign governments, including tax incentives and subsidies, as well as on political support for certain environmental initiatives. The sub-adviser’s analysis of determining which companies meet its impact investing criteria is a subjective determination. As a result, the Fund may invest in companies that do not reflect the beliefs and values of any particular investor. The Fund’s exclusion of certain investments from its investment universe may adversely affect the Fund’s relative performance at times when such investments are performing well.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Sector Risk –  The Fund’s investments may be focused in securities of companies in the health care and information technology sectors of the securities markets, which may cause the Fund’s performance to be sensitive to developments affecting those sectors generally or companies in those sectors.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.
Include when the Fund operated as a feeder fund in a master feeder structure prior to October 7, 2019.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Returns do not include sales charges. If sales charges were reflected, returns would have been lower
Shows the returns of Class A shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
19

Total returns by calendar year (excludes sales charges)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
21.97%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-22.72%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. After-tax returns, which are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes, are shown only for Class A shares and will vary for other classes. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022 (including sales charges)
 
 
Since Inception
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
(2/28/2017)
Class A –  Return Before Taxes
-26.99%
3.86%
6.96%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions
-27.07%
2.61%
5.64%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-15.92%
2.47%
4.90%
Share Classes (Return Before Taxes)
 
 
 
Class C
-24.10%
4.38%
7.30%
Class I
-22.52%
5.42%
8.39%
Class R3
-22.93%
4.92%
7.91%
Class R4
-22.67%
5.16%
8.13%
Class R5
-22.42%
5.43%
8.40%
Class R6
-22.39%
5.53%
8.50%
Class Y
-22.41%
5.52%
8.48%
Class F
-22.35%
5.57%
8.53%
MSCI ACWI Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes but
reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
-18.36%
5.23%
7.37%
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Tara C. Stilwell, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Equity Portfolio Manager
2019
Jason M. Goins, CFA
Managing Director and Equity Research Analyst
2018
20

PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Not all share classes are available for all investors. Minimum investment amounts may be waived for certain accounts. Certain financial intermediaries may impose different restrictions than those described below.
Share Classes
Minimum Initial Investment
Minimum
Subsequent
Investment
Class A, Class C and Class I
$2,000 for all accounts except: $250, if establishing an Automatic
Investment Plan (“AIP”), with recurring monthly investments of at
least $50
$50
Class R3, Class R4, Class R5 and Class R6
No minimum initial investment
None
Class Y
$250,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
Class F
$1,000,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
For more information, please see the “How To Buy And Sell Shares” section of the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
You may sell your shares of the Fund on those days when the New York Stock Exchange is open, typically Monday through Friday. You may sell your shares through your financial intermediary. With respect to certain accounts, you may sell your shares on the web at hartfordfunds.com, by phone by calling 1-888-843-7824, by electronic funds transfer, or by wire. In certain circumstances you will need to write to Hartford Funds to request to sell your shares. For regular mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, P.O. Box 219060, Kansas City, MO 64121-9060. For overnight mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, 430 W 7th Street, Suite 219060, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial professional), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
21

Hartford International Equity Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks long-term capital appreciation.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 79 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees
0.46%
0.46%
0.46%
0.46%
0.46%
0.46%
0.46%
0.46%
0.46%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Other expenses
0.25%
0.30%
0.17%
0.29%
0.24%
0.19%
0.07%
0.18%
0.07%
Total annual fund operating expenses
0.96%
1.76%
0.63%
1.25%
0.95%
0.65%
0.53%
0.64%
0.53%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$643
$839
$1,052
$1,663
C
$279
$554
$954
$2,073
I
$64
$202
$351
$786
R3
$127
$397
$686
$1,511
R4
$97
$303
$525
$1,166
R5
$66
$208
$362
$810
R6
$54
$170
$296
$665
Y
$65
$205
$357
$798
F
$54
$170
$296
$665
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$179
$554
$954
$2,073
22

Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 27% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing at least 65% of its net assets in foreign equity securities. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its assets in equity securities or equity-related securities, including derivative investments that provide exposure to equity securities. The Fund seeks to outperform the MSCI ACWI ex USA Index. The Fund diversifies its investments among a broad range of companies in a number of different countries throughout the world, with no limit on the amount of assets that may be invested in each country. Securities in which the Fund invests are denominated in both U.S. dollars and foreign currencies and may trade in both U.S. and foreign markets. The Fund may invest in securities of companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The Fund may invest in companies of any market capitalization, and may trade securities actively.
The Fund seeks its investment objective by employing a multiple sleeve structure, which means the Fund has several components that are managed separately using different investment styles. Each component sleeve has a distinct investment philosophy and analytical process to identify specific securities for purchase or sale. Each of these sleeves is managed independently of each other. Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”), the Fund’s sub-adviser, also may invest a portion of the Fund’s assets in securities that it believes may complement the risk factor biases of the other sleeves (“Risk Managed Sleeve”) and selects such securities using systematic screening methodologies. Wellington Management does not allocate a set percentage to any specific sleeve but instead seeks a flexible and diversified Fund profile. Together the strategies represent a wide range of investment philosophies that are intended to be complementary to each other, companies, industries, and market capitalizations.
Investments are deemed to be “foreign” if: (a) an issuer’s domicile or location of headquarters is in a foreign country; (b) an issuer derives a significant proportion (at least 50%) of its revenues or profits from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in a foreign country or has at least 50% of its assets situated in a foreign country; (c) the principal trading market for a security is located in a foreign country; or (d) it is a foreign currency.
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions,
23

confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Regional/Country Focus Risk –  To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular geographic region or country, the Fund may be subject to increased currency, political, regulatory, economic and other risks associated with that region or country. A natural or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region. As a result, the Fund may be subject to greater price volatility and risk of loss than a fund holding more geographically diverse investments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Mid Cap and Small Cap Securities Risk –  Investments in mid- and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than investments in larger, more established companies. Many of these companies are young and have limited operating or business history. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks, including the risk of bankruptcy.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Asset Allocation Risk –  The risk that if the Fund’s strategy for allocating assets among different portfolio management teams does not work as intended, the Fund may not achieve its objective or may underperform other funds with similar investment strategies. The investment styles employed by the portfolio managers may not be complementary, which could adversely affect the performance of the Fund.
Quantitative Investing Risk –  The value of securities or other investments selected using quantitative analysis can perform differently from the market as a whole or from their expected performance. This may be as a result of the factors used in building the quantitative analytical framework, the weights placed on each factor, the accuracy of historical data supplied by third parties, and changing sources of market returns.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Active Trading Risk –  Active trading could increase the Fund’s transaction costs and may increase your tax liability as compared to a fund with less active trading policies. These effects may adversely affect Fund performance.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
24

The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect the Fund’s performance when the Fund pursued a modified investment strategy prior to August 13, 2015
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.
The bar chart:
Shows how the Fund’s total return has varied from year to year
Returns do not include sales charges. If sales charges were reflected, returns would have been lower
Shows the returns of Class A shares. Returns for the Fund’s other classes differ only to the extent that the classes do not have the same expenses.
Total returns by calendar year (excludes sales charges)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter Ended
Best Quarter Return
17.90%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-24.23%
March 31, 2020
Average Annual Total Returns. The table below shows returns for the Fund over time compared to those of a broad-based market index. After-tax returns, which are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes, are shown only for Class A shares and will vary for other classes. Actual after-tax returns, which depend on an investor’s particular tax situation, may differ from those shown and are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
25

Average annual total returns for periods ending December 31, 2022 (including sales charges)
Share Classes
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Class A –  Return Before Taxes
-19.13%
-1.18%
3.40%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions
-19.47%
-1.49%
2.99%
–  Return After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-10.79%
-0.73%
2.77%
Share Classes (Return Before Taxes)
 
 
 
Class C
-15.92%
-0.82%
3.21%
Class I
-14.11%
0.32%
4.35%
Class R3
-14.59%
-0.33%
3.72%
Class R4
-14.39%
-0.06%
4.01%
Class R5
-14.10%
0.34%
4.31%
Class R6*
-14.05%
0.50%
4.50%
Class Y
-14.12%
0.35%
4.42%
Class F*
-14.03%
0.43%
4.43%
MSCI ACWI ex USA Index (Net) (reflects reinvested dividends net of withholding taxes but
reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or other taxes)
-16.00%
0.88%
3.80%
*
Class R6 shares commenced operations on February 28, 2018 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class Y shares. Class F shares commenced operations on February 28, 2017 and performance prior to that date is that of the Fund’s Class I shares. Performance prior to an inception date of a class has not been adjusted to reflect the operating expenses of such class.
MANAGEMENT. The Fund’s investment manager is Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC. The Fund’s sub-adviser is Wellington Management. The Fund employs a multiple portfolio manager structure. The portfolio managers with the most significant responsibilities are set forth below.
Portfolio Manager
Title
Involved with
Fund Since
Gregg R. Thomas, CFA
Senior Managing Director and Director, Investment Strategy
2013
Thomas S. Simon, CFA, FRM
Senior Managing Director and Portfolio Manager
2015
PURCHASE AND SALE OF FUND SHARES. Classes A, C, and I of the Fund are closed to new investors. No purchases of a closed share class are allowed, other than as follows: (i) purchases by shareholders of record of the Fund as of March 30, 2018 to add to their existing Fund accounts through subsequent purchases, through conversions of their shares for another share class in the Fund, or through exchanges from other Hartford mutual funds; (ii) purchases through reinvestment of dividends or capital gains distributions; (iii) purchases by existing shareholders, or exchanges into the Fund by shareholders of other Hartford mutual funds, through participation in broker/dealer wrap fee programs (i.e., certain approved broker/dealer wrap fee programs can place new shareholders into the Fund); (iv) purchases by qualified employee benefit plans, such as 401(k), 403(b), 457 plans and health savings account programs (and their successor, related and affiliated plans) that have made the Fund available to participants on or before March 30, 2018; (v) purchases by certain financial institutions or financial intermediary firms that have been approved by Hartford Funds Distributors, LLC to purchase shares of the Fund on behalf of their client; (vi) purchases, including through reinvestment of dividends or capital gains distributions, by any shareholder who receives shares of the Fund as part of a reorganization; (vii) purchases through new accounts established with existing shares of the Fund by transfer, such as transfers as a result of death; and (viii) purchases through an approved broker-dealer by: employees of Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC and its affiliates, employees of Wellington Management, and directors of The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc. Please see the section entitled “Classes of Shares” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus for more information.
26

Not all share classes are available for all investors. Minimum investment amounts may be waived for certain accounts. Certain financial intermediaries may impose different restrictions than those described below.
Share Classes
Minimum Initial Investment
Minimum
Subsequent
Investment
Class A, Class C and Class I
$2,000 for all accounts except: $250, if establishing an Automatic
Investment Plan (“AIP”), with recurring monthly investments of at
least $50
$50
Class R3, Class R4, Class R5 and Class R6
No minimum initial investment
None
Class Y
$250,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
Class F
$1,000,000
This requirement is waived when the shares are purchased
through omnibus accounts (or similar types of accounts).
None
For more information, please see the “How To Buy And Sell Shares” section of the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
You may sell your shares of the Fund on those days when the New York Stock Exchange is open, typically Monday through Friday. You may sell your shares through your financial intermediary. With respect to certain accounts, you may sell your shares on the web at hartfordfunds.com, by phone by calling 1-888-843-7824, by electronic funds transfer, or by wire. In certain circumstances you will need to write to Hartford Funds to request to sell your shares. For regular mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, P.O. Box 219060, Kansas City, MO 64121-9060. For overnight mail, please send the request to Hartford Funds, 430 W 7th Street, Suite 219060, Kansas City, MO 64105-1407.
TAX INFORMATION. The Fund’s distributions are generally taxable, and may be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Such tax-deferred arrangements may be taxed later upon withdrawal of monies from those arrangements.
PAYMENTS TO BROKER-DEALERS AND OTHER FINANCIAL INTERMEDIARIES. If you purchase shares of the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank or financial professional), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your financial professional to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your financial professional or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
27

The Hartford International Growth Fund Summary Section
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE. The Fund seeks capital appreciation.
YOUR EXPENSES. The table below describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example below. Please contact your financial intermediary for more information regarding whether you may be required to pay a brokerage commission or other fees. You may qualify for sales charge discounts for Class A shares if you and your family invest, or agree to invest in the future, at least $50,000 in certain classes of Hartford mutual funds or in The Hartford® SMART529® College Savings Plan. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in the “How Sales Charges Are Calculated” section beginning on page 79 of the Fund’s statutory prospectus. Descriptions of any financial intermediary specific sales charge waivers and discounts are set forth in Appendix A to the statutory prospectus.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Maximum sales charge (load) imposed
on purchases (as a percentage of
offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum deferred sales charge (load)
(as a percentage of purchase price or
redemption proceeds, whichever is less)
None(1)
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Share Classes
A
C
I
R3
R4
R5
R6
Y
F
Management fees
0.77%
0.77%
0.77%
0.77%
0.77%
0.77%
0.77%
0.77%
0.77%
Distribution and service (12b-1) fees
0.25%
1.00%
None
0.50%
0.25%
None
None
None
None
Other expenses
0.28%
0.33%
0.20%
0.30%
0.25%
0.20%
0.08%
0.19%
0.08%
Total annual fund operating expenses
1.30%
2.10%
0.97%
1.57%
1.27%
0.97%
0.85%
0.96%
0.85%
Fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(2)
0.00%
0.05%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
0.01%
0.00%
Total annual fund operating expenses
after fee waiver and/or expense
reimbursement(2)
1.30%
2.05%
0.97%
1.57%
1.27%
0.97%
0.85%
0.95%
0.85%
(1)
Investments of $1 million or more will not be subject to a front-end sales charge, but may be subject to a 1.00% contingent deferred sales charge.
(2)
Hartford Funds Management Company, LLC (the “Investment Manager”) has contractually agreed to reimburse expenses (exclusive of taxes, interest expenses, brokerage commissions, acquired fund fees and expenses and extraordinary expenses) to the extent necessary to limit total annual fund operating expenses as follows: 1.30% (Class A), 2.05% (Class C), 0.98% (Class I), 1.57% (Class R3), 1.27% (Class R4), 1.00% (Class R5), 0.85% (Class R6), 0.95% (Class Y), and 0.85% (Class F). This contractual arrangement will remain in effect until February 29, 2024 unless the Board of Directors of The Hartford Mutual Funds, Inc. approves its earlier termination.
Example. The example below is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then, except as shown below, redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that:
Your investment has a 5% return each year
The Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the example reflects the fee waiver and/or expense reimbursement arrangement reflected in the table above for only the first year)
You reinvest all dividends and distributions.
28

Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
Share Classes
Year 1
Year 3
Year 5
Year 10
A
$675
$939
$1,224
$2,031
C
$308
$653
$1,124
$2,427
I
$99
$309
$536
$1,190
R3
$160
$496
$855
$1,867
R4
$129
$403
$697
$1,534
R5
$99
$309
$536
$1,190
R6
$87
$271
$471
$1,049
Y
$97
$305
$530
$1,177
F
$87
$271
$471
$1,049
If you did not redeem your shares:
C
$208
$653
$1,124
$2,427
Portfolio Turnover. The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 30% of the average value of its portfolio.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGY. The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing in companies that Wellington Management Company LLP (“Wellington Management”) believes are globally competitive and exhibit the potential for growth. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 65% of its net assets in equity securities, including non-dollar securities, of foreign issuers. The Fund diversifies its investments among a number of different sectors and countries throughout the world, with no limit on the amount of assets that may be invested in each sector or country. Although some consideration is given to ensuring sector and country diversification, allocation of investments among sectors and countries is primarily the result of security selection. The Fund may invest in securities of companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets as a percentage of its net assets up to the greater of: (a) 30% or (b) the weight of emerging markets in the MSCI ACWI ex USA Growth Index plus 15%. The Fund may invest in securities of any market capitalization, but tends to focus on companies with market capitalizations greater than $3 billion. Based on market or economic conditions, the Fund may, through its normal bottom-up stock selection process, focus in one or more sectors of the market. The Fund typically employs a focused portfolio investing style (i.e., a portfolio consisting of a relatively small number of holdings).
PRINCIPAL RISKS. The principal risks of investing in the Fund are described below. When you sell your shares they may be worth more or less than what you paid for them, which means that you could lose money as a result of your investment. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. As with any fund, there is no guarantee that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Market Risk –  Market risk is the risk that one or more markets in which the Fund invests will go down in value, including the possibility that the markets will go down sharply and unpredictably. Securities of a company may decline in value due to its financial prospects and activities, including certain operational impacts, such as data breaches and cybersecurity attacks. Securities may also decline in value due to general market and economic movements and trends, including adverse changes to credit markets, or as a result of other events such as geopolitical events, natural disasters, or widespread pandemics (such as COVID-19) or other adverse public health developments.
Foreign Investments Risk –  Investments in foreign securities may be riskier, more volatile, and less liquid than investments in U.S. securities. Differences between the U.S. and foreign regulatory regimes and securities markets, including the less stringent investor protection, less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards of some foreign markets, as well as political and economic developments in foreign countries and regions and the U.S. (including the imposition of sanctions, tariffs, or other governmental restrictions), may affect the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities. Changes in currency exchange rates may also adversely affect the Fund’s foreign investments.
29

Emerging Markets Risk –  The risks related to investing in foreign securities are generally greater with respect to investments in companies that conduct their principal business activities in emerging markets or whose securities are traded principally on exchanges in emerging markets. The risks of investing in emerging markets include risks of illiquidity, increased price volatility, smaller market capitalizations, less government regulation and oversight, less extensive and less frequent accounting, financial, auditing and other reporting requirements, significant delays in settlement of trades, risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration and custody and substantial economic and political disruptions. In addition, the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), sanctions, confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments may also result in losses. Frontier markets are those emerging markets that are considered to be among the smallest, least mature and least liquid, and as a result, the risks of investing in emerging markets are magnified in frontier markets.
Currency Risk –  The risk that the value of the Fund’s investments in foreign securities or currencies will be affected by the value of the applicable currency relative to the U.S. dollar. When the Fund sells a foreign currency or foreign currency denominated security, its value may be worth less in U.S. dollars even if the investment increases in value in its local market. U.S. dollar-denominated securities of foreign issuers may also be affected by currency risk, as the revenue earned by issuers of these securities may also be affected by changes in the issuer’s local currency.
Regional/Country Focus Risk –  To the extent that the Fund focuses its investments in a particular geographic region or country, the Fund may be subject to increased currency, political, regulatory, economic and other risks associated with that region or country. A natural or other disaster could occur in a geographic region in which the Fund invests, which could affect the economy or particular business operations of companies in the specific geographic region. As a result, the Fund may be subject to greater price volatility and risk of loss than a fund holding more geographically diverse investments.
Equity Risk –  The risk that the price of equity or equity related securities may decline due to changes in a company’s financial condition and overall market and economic conditions.
Mid-Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of mid-capitalization companies generally trade in lower volumes and are generally subject to greater and less predictable price changes than the securities of larger capitalization companies.
Large Cap Securities Risk –  The securities of large market capitalization companies may underperform other segments of the market because such companies may be less responsive to competitive challenges and opportunities and may be unable to attain high growth rates during periods of economic expansion.
Growth Investing Style Risk –  If the sub-adviser incorrectly assesses a company’s prospects for growth or how other investors will value the company’s growth, then the price of the company’s stock may decrease, or may not increase to the level anticipated by the sub-adviser. In addition, growth stocks may be more volatile than other stocks because they are more sensitive to investors’ perceptions of the issuing company’s growth potential. Also, the growth investing style may over time go in and out of favor. At times when the investing style used by the Fund is out of favor, the Fund may underperform other equity funds that use different investing styles.
Active Investment Management Risk –  The risk that, if the sub-adviser’s investment strategy does not perform as expected, the Fund could underperform its peers or lose money. Although the sub-adviser considers several factors when making investment decisions, the sub-adviser may not evaluate every factor prior to investing in a company or issuer, and the sub-adviser may determine that certain factors are more significant than others.
Securities Lending Risk –  The Fund may lose money because the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money in the event of a decline in the value of the collateral provided for loaned securities or a decline in the value of any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund.
Sector Risk –  To the extent the Fund invests more heavily in a particular sector or sectors, its performance will be especially sensitive to developments that significantly affect those sectors. Individual sectors may be more volatile, and may perform differently, from the broader market.
Focused Portfolio Risk –  Because the Fund may invest in a limited number of companies, the Fund is subject to greater risk of loss if any of those securities decline in price.
30

Volatility Risk –  The Fund’s investments may fluctuate in value over a short period of time. This may cause the Fund’s net asset value per share to experience significant changes in value over short periods of time.
Liquidity Risk –  The risk that the market for a particular investment or type of investment is or becomes relatively illiquid, making it difficult for the Fund to sell that investment at an advantageous time or price. Illiquidity may be due to events relating to the issuer of the securities, market events, rising interest rates, economic conditions or investor perceptions. Illiquid securities may be difficult to value and their value may be lower than the market price of comparable liquid securities, which would negatively affect the Fund’s performance.
Large Shareholder Transaction Risk –  The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders redeem or purchase large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such redemptions may cause the Fund to sell securities at times when it would not otherwise do so or borrow money (at a cost to the Fund), which may negatively impact the Fund’s performance and liquidity. Similarly, large purchases may adversely affect the Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash and is required to maintain a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs.
The Fund is subject to certain other risks. For more information regarding risks and investments, please see “Additional Information Regarding Investment Strategies and Risks” and “More Information About Risks” in the Fund’s statutory prospectus.
PAST PERFORMANCE. The performance information indicates the risks of investing in the Fund. Keep in mind that past performance does not indicate future results. Updated performance information is available at hartfordfunds.com. The returns in the bar chart and table:
Assume reinvestment of all dividends and distributions
Reflect fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, if any. Absent any applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitation arrangements, performance would have been lower.