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IndexIQ ETF Trust
Prospectus
August 31, 2021
IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF (HYLV)
NEITHER THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION NOR ANY STATE SECURITIES COMMISSION HAS APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED OF THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ACCURACY OR ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
As permitted by regulations adopted by the Securities and Exchange Commission, paper copies of the Fund’s shareholder reports will no longer be sent by mail, unless you specifically request paper copies of the reports from your financial intermediary, such as a broker-dealer or bank. Instead, the reports will be made available on a website, and you will be notified by mail each time a report is posted and provided with a website link to access the report.
If you already elected to receive shareholder reports electronically, you will not be affected by this change and you need not take any action. If you hold accounts through a financial intermediary, you may contact your financial intermediary to enroll in electronic delivery. Please note that not all financial intermediaries may offer this service.
You may elect to receive all future reports in paper free of charge. If you hold accounts through a financial intermediary, you can contact your financial intermediary to request that you continue to receive paper copies of your shareholder reports. Your election to receive reports in paper will apply to all funds held with your financial intermediary.
Not FDIC Insured   |   May Lose Value   |   No Bank Guarantee
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IndexIQ ETF Trust (the “Trust”) is a registered investment company that consists of separate investment portfolios called “Funds.” This Prospectus relates to the following Fund:
Name
CUSIP
Symbol
IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF
45409B412
HYLV
The Fund is an exchange-traded fund. This means that shares of the Fund are listed on a national securities exchange, such as the NYSE Arca, Inc. (“NYSE Arca”), and trade at market prices. The market price for the Fund’s shares may be different from its net asset value per share (the “NAV”). The Fund has its own CUSIP number and exchange trading symbol.
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Summary Information
IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF
Investment Objective
The Fund seeks investment results that track (before fees and expenses) the price and yield performance of its underlying index, the S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index (the “Underlying Index”).
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, sell or hold shares of the Fund (“Shares”). Investors may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and example set forth below.
Shareholder Fees (fees paid directly from your investment):
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses (expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment):
Management Fee 0.40%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees 0.00%
Other Expenses 0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses 0.41%
Expense Waiver/Reimbursement(a) 0.01%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Waiver/Reimbursement 0.40%
(a)
IndexIQ Advisors LLC has contractually agreed to waive or reduce its management fee and/or reimburse expenses of the Fund in an amount that limits “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” ​(exclusive of interest, taxes, brokerage fees and commissions, dividends paid on short sales, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) to not more than 0.40% of the average daily net assets of the Fund. The agreement will remain in effect until August 31, 2022, unless terminated by the Board of Trustees.
Example. This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other funds. This example does not take into account brokerage commissions that you pay when purchasing or selling Shares of the Fund.
The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain at current levels. The return of 5% and estimated expenses are for illustration purposes only, and should not be considered indicators of expected Fund expenses or performance, which may be greater or less than the estimates. Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
$41
$131
$229
$517
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual Fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recent fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 105% of the average value of its portfolio. This rate excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as a result of in-kind creations or redemptions of the Shares.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of the S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index (the “Underlying Index”), which has been developed by S&P Opco LLC (a subsidiary of S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC) (the “Index Provider”). The Underlying Index is comprised of U.S. dollar denominated high yield corporate bonds that have been selected in accordance with a rules-based methodology that seeks to identify securities that, in the aggregate, are expected to have lower volatility relative to the broad U.S. dollar denominated high yield corporate bond market. The Underlying Index is a market value weighted index comprised of bonds included in the S&P U.S. High Yield Corporate Bond Index that meet liquidity and risk-based selection criteria.
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The Underlying Index is comprised of U.S. dollar denominated high yield corporate bonds of issuers domiciled in the U.S. and foreign countries classified as developed markets by the Index Provider. To be eligible for inclusion in the Underlying Index, bonds must meet the following criteria: (i) pay fixed-rate coupons; (ii) have at least $400 million of outstanding face value; (iii) have a remaining maturity of at least one month as of the rebalancing date; and (v) have an average rating below investment grade by Moody’s Investors Service, Standard & Poor’s, and/or Fitch Ratings. Eligible U.S. dollar denominated high yield corporate bonds are further screened for liquidity considerations based on their bond type, size, spread, duration and time since issuance.
Once the Underlying Index universe is defined based on the eligibility criteria, each bond is then ranked according to its marginal contribution to risk (“MCR”). MCR is a measurement of the amount of risk a security contributes to a portfolio of securities. MCR is calculated using a bond’s duration and the difference between the bond’s spread (the difference between the option-adjusted yield of the bond and the yield of a U.S. treasury security with a similar maturity) and a weighted average spread of the bonds in the index universe. In general, a bond with a higher MCR will add more credit risk to the overall portfolio than a bond with a lower MCR.
After ranking all eligible bonds based upon their MCR, the Underlying Index selects for inclusion the 50 percent of bonds measured to have the least credit risk based on their MCR. A bond included in the Underlying Index must remain in the 60 percent of bonds measured to have the least credit risk based on its MCR to remain in the Underlying Index. The Underlying Index seeks to construct a portfolio of securities that has lower volatility than the U.S. dollar-denominated high yield bond universe through the selection of lower-risk bonds based on MCR. Once the bonds are selected for inclusion in the Underlying Index, they are weighted by market value.
The Underlying Index is rebalanced monthly and typically consists of 400 to 500 securities.
The Fund uses a “Representative Sampling” strategy in seeking to track the performance of the Underlying Index. A fund using a Representative Sampling strategy generally will invest in a sample of securities that collectively has an investment profile similar to that of the Underlying Index. The securities selected are expected to have, in the aggregate, investment characteristics (based on factors such as market capitalization and industry weightings), fundamental characteristics (such as return variability, duration, maturity, credit ratings and yield) and liquidity measures similar to those of the Underlying Index. The Fund may also invest in credit default swaps and futures contracts to seek to track the Underlying Index.
To the extent the Underlying Index concentrates (i.e., holds 25% or more of its total assets) in the securities of a particular industry or group of industries, the Fund will concentrate its investments to approximately the same extent as the Underlying Index. As of June 30, 2021, a significant portion of the Underlying Index is represented by securities of companies in the communication services sector and financials sector.
The Fund may invest in one or more ETFs advised by the Advisor (“Affiliated ETFs”) that are not components of the index if such an investment will help the Fund track the Underlying Index.
Principal Risks
As with all investments, there are certain risks of investing in the Fund. The Fund’s Shares will change in value and you could lose money by investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund does not represent a complete investment program. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and it is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency, the Advisor or any of its affiliates. You should consider carefully the following risks before investing in the Fund.
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only certain large institutions may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund (each, an “Authorized Participant”). The Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that those Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to engage in creation and redemption transactions with the Fund, may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting.
Credit Risk
Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments when due or otherwise honor its obligations. Changes in an issuer’s or
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counterparty’s credit rating or the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may also adversely affect the value of the Fund’s investment in that issuer. The degree of credit risk depends on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation.
Cyber Security Risk
The Fund is susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. Such events may cause the Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity and could cause the Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. In addition, cyber security breaches of the securities issuers or the Fund’s third-party service providers can also subject the Fund to many of the same risks associated with direct cyber security breaches. Although the Fund has established risk management systems designed to reduce the risks associated with cyber security, there is no guarantee that such efforts will succeed.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. The use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Fund’s Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements.
Foreign Securities Risk
Investments in the securities of non-U.S. issuers involve risks beyond those associated with investments in U.S. securities. These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.
High Yield Securities Risk
High yield securities, or “junk” bonds, generally offer a higher current yield than the yield available from higher grade issues, but are subject to greater market fluctuations, are less liquid and provide a greater risk of loss than investment grade securities, and therefore are considered to be highly speculative. In general, high yield securities may have a greater risk of default than other types of securities and could cause income and principal losses for the Fund.
Income Risk
The Fund’s income may decline when interest rates fall or if there are defaults in its portfolio. This decline can occur because the Fund may subsequently invest in lower-yielding securities when securities in its portfolio mature or the Fund otherwise needs to purchase additional securities.
Index Risk
There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of the Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory
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restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in order to track the Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders.
Industry/Sector Concentration Risk
The Fund’s investment of a large percentage of its assets in the securities of issuers within the same industry or sector means that an adverse economic, business or political development may affect the value of the Fund’s investments more than if the Fund were more broadly diversified. A concentration makes the Fund more susceptible to any single occurrence and may subject the Fund to greater market risk than a fund that is not so concentrated. To the extent that the Underlying Index is concentrated in a particular industry, the Fund also will be concentrated in that industry.
Communication Services Sector Risk
Companies in the communication services sector may be adversely affected by, among other things, industry competition, substantial capital requirements, changes in government regulation and obsolescence of communication services products due to technological advancement. Communication services companies may also be subject to risks associated with intellectual property use, fluctuating domestic and international demand, shifting demographics and changes in consumer tastes. While network security breaches can happen to all companies, certain communication services companies are more susceptible to hacking, theft of proprietary or consumer information and disruptions in service.
Financials Sector Risk
Companies in the financials sector may be adversely affected by, among other things, government regulations, economic conditions, credit rating downgrades, changes in currency exchange rates, volatile interest rates, decreased liquidity in credit markets and competition from new entrants. Profitability of these companies is largely dependent on the availability and cost of capital and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change. Credit losses resulting from financial difficulties of borrowers also can negatively impact the sector. These companies are often subject to substantial government regulation and intervention, which may adversely impact the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge, the amount of capital they must maintain and, potentially, their size. The impact of more stringent capital requirements, or recent or future regulation in various countries on any individual financial company or on the financials sector as a whole cannot be predicted. The financials sector is also a target for cyber attacks and may experience technology malfunctions and disruptions.
Interest Rate Risk
An increase in interest rates may cause the value of securities held by the Fund to decline. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. The negative impact on the Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities.
During periods of falling interest rates, an issuer of a callable security held by the Fund may “call” or repay the security before its stated maturity, which may result in the Fund having to reinvest the proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features.
The terms of floating rate notes and other instruments may be tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), which functions as a reference rate or benchmark. It is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued at the end of 2021, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments.
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Investment Style Risk
The Underlying Index seeks to allocate investment exposure based upon a particular style of investing. Different investment styles tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions and investor sentiment. As a consequence, the Fund may underperform as compared to the market generally or to other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles. Further, there is no guarantee that the Underlying Index will accurately or optimally utilize the investment style or that it will successfully provide the desired investment exposure.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. Certain investments may be subject to restrictions on resale, trade over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lack an active trading market. Accordingly, the Fund may not be able to sell or close out of such investments at favorable times or prices (or at all), or at the prices approximating those at which the Fund currently values them. Illiquid securities may trade at a discount from comparable, more liquid investments and may be subject to wide fluctuations in market value.
Market Risk
Market risks include political, regulatory, market and economic developments, including developments that impact specific economic sectors, industries or segments of the market, which may affect the Fund’s value. Turbulence in financial markets, tariffs and other protectionist measures, political developments and uncertainty, central bank policy, and reduced liquidity in equity, credit and fixed income markets may negatively affect many issuers worldwide, which could have an adverse effect on the Fund. During a general downturn in the securities markets, multiple asset classes may be negatively affected. Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on a Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions, and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets.
Operational Risk
The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund and Advisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks.
Passive Management Risk
The Fund is not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, the Underlying Index. The Index Provider or the index calculation agent may make errors. The Index Provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in the Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track the Underlying Index’s performance, the Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because the Fund
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incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Funds that track indices with significant weight in high yield securities may experience higher tracking error than other index ETFs that do not track such indices.
The Fund generally will not attempt to take defensive positions in declining markets and generally will not sell a security because its issuer is in financial trouble, unless that security is removed from (or was no longer useful in tracking a component of) the Underlying Index.
Portfolio Turnover Risk
The Fund’s strategy may frequently involve buying and selling portfolio securities to rebalance the Fund’s investment exposures. High portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than expected.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. In general, the trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity and wide “bid/ask” spreads (which may be especially pronounced for smaller funds). Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in the Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in the Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Fund’s Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the underlying value of the Fund’s portfolio holdings or NAV. As a result, the trading prices of the Fund’s Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Although it is generally expected that the market price of the Shares of the Fund will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares.
Valuation Risk
Independent market quotations for certain investments held by the Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that the Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the value of the securities or other assets in the Fund’s portfolio may change on days or during time periods when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares.
Performance Information
The bar chart that follows shows the annual total returns of the Fund for a full calendar year. The table that follows the bar chart shows the Fund’s average annual total return, both before and after taxes. The bar chart and table provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by comparing the Fund’s performance from year to year and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns for one calendar year compared with its underlying index and additional broad measures of market performance. The S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index is designed to measure the performance of U.S. high yield corporate bonds with potentially low volatility. The ICE BofAML U.S. High Yield Index tracks the performance of U.S. dollar-denominated below investment grade corporate debt publicly issued in the U.S. domestic market.
All returns assume reinvestment of dividends and distributions. The Fund’s past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Performance reflects fee
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waivers and/or expense reimbursement in effect, if such waivers or reimbursements were not in place, the Fund’s performance would be reduced. Fund performance current to the most recent month-end is available by calling 1-888-474-7725 or by visiting newyorklifeinvestments.com.
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The Fund’s year-to-date total returns as of June 30, 2021 was 1.14%.
Best and Worst Quarter Returns (for the period reflected in the bar chart above)
Return
Quarter/Year
Highest Return 6.63% 1Q/2019
Lowest Return -7.37% 1Q/2020
Average Annual Total Returns as of December 31, 2020
1 Year
Since
Inception(1)
Returns before taxes 4.00% 4.60%
Returns after taxes on distributions(2) 2.27% 2.83%
Returns after taxes on distributions and sales of Fund shares(2) 2.32% 2.73%
S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
4.91% 5.04%
ICE BofAML U.S. High Yield Index
(reflects no deduction for fees, expenses or taxes)
6.17% 5.92%
(1)
The Fund commenced operations on February 15, 2017.
(2)
After-tax returns are calculated using the highest historical individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on your tax situation and may differ from those shown and are not relevant if you hold your shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts. In some cases the return after taxes may exceed the return before taxes due to an assumed tax benefit from any losses on a sale of Fund Shares at the end of the measurement period.
Investment Advisor and Subadvisor
IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) is the investment advisor to the Fund.
MacKay Shields LLC (the “Subadvisor”) is the investment subadvisor to the Fund.
Portfolio Managers
Alexandra Wilson-Elizondo and Eric Gold of the Subadvisor are primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund. Ms. Wilson-Elizondo has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since its inception. Mr. Gold has been a portfolio manager of the Fund since August 2021.
Purchase and Sale of Fund Shares
Unlike conventional mutual funds, the Fund issues and redeems Shares on a continuous basis, at NAV, only in large blocks of Shares called “Creation Units.” Individual Shares of the Fund may only be purchased and sold on the secondary market through a broker-dealer. Since Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges in the secondary market at their market price rather than their NAV, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a price greater than (premium) or less than (discount) the Fund’s NAV. An investor may incur costs attributable to the difference between the highest price a buyer is willing to pay to purchase Shares of the Fund (bid) and the lowest price a seller is willing to accept for Shares of the Fund (ask) when buying or selling Shares in the secondary market (the “bid-ask spread”). Recent information, including the Fund’s NAV, market price, premiums and discounts, and bid-ask spreads, is available online at newyorklifeinvestments.com.
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Tax Information
The Fund’s distributions are expected to be taxed as ordinary income, qualified dividend income and/or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or individual retirement account. However, subsequent withdrawals from such a tax-advantaged account may be subject to U.S. federal income tax. You should consult your tax advisor about your specific situation.
Financial Intermediary Compensation
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Advisor or other related companies may pay the intermediary for marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems or other services related to the sale or promotion of the Fund. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s website for more information.
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Overview
The Trust is an investment company consisting of a number of separate investment portfolios (each, a “Fund” and together, the “Funds”) that are structured as exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”). Each share of a Fund represents an ownership interest in the securities and other instruments comprising a Fund’s portfolio. Unlike shares of a mutual fund, which can be bought and redeemed from the issuing fund by all shareholders at a price based on net asset value (“NAV”), shares of an ETF (such as the Fund) are listed on a national securities exchange and trade in the secondary market at market prices that change throughout the day, and may differ from a Fund’s NAV. IndexIQ Advisors LLC (the “Advisor”) is the investment advisor to the Fund and MacKay Shields LLC (the “Subadvisor”) is the investment subadvisor to the Fund.
The Fund has a distinct investment objective and policies. Each of the policies described herein, including the investment objective of the Fund, constitutes a non-fundamental policy that may be changed by the Board of Trustees of the Trust (the “Board”) without shareholder approval. Certain fundamental policies of the Fund are set forth in the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (the “SAI”) under “Investment Restrictions.” There can be no assurance that the Fund’s objective will be achieved.
Description of the Principal Investment Strategies of the Fund
The Fund seeks investment results that correspond (before fees and expenses) generally to the price and yield performance of its underlying index (each, an “Underlying Index”). The Underlying Index consists of a number of components (“Underlying Index Components”) selected in accordance with the Underlying Index’s rules-based methodology. The Fund employs a “passive management” — or indexing — investment approach designed to track the performance of its Underlying Index. Under normal circumstances, the Fund invests at least 80% of its net assets, plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes, in the components that make up its Underlying Index or in depositary receipts based on the securities in the Underlying Index. In determining the Fund’s net assets for the purposes of this 80% threshold, accounting practices do not include collateral held under the Fund’s securities lending program, as such collateral does not represent a true asset of the Fund.
The Fund uses a “representative sampling” strategy in seeking to track the performance of the Underlying Index. A fund using a representative sampling strategy generally will invest in a sample of securities that collectively has an investment profile similar to that of the Underlying Index. The securities selected are expected to have, in the aggregate, investment characteristics (based on factors such as market capitalization and industry weightings), fundamental characteristics (including, but not limited to return variability, duration, maturity, credit ratings and yield) and liquidity measures similar to those of the Underlying Index. The Fund may also invest in credit default swaps and futures contracts to seek to track the Underlying Index.
There also may be instances in which the Subadvisor may choose to (i) overweight a security in the Underlying Index, (ii) purchase securities not contained in the Underlying Index that the Subadvisor believes are appropriate to substitute for certain securities in the Underlying Index, or (iii) utilize various combinations of other available investment techniques in seeking to track the Underlying Index. The Fund may sell securities that are represented in the applicable Underlying Index in anticipation of their removal from the Underlying Index or purchase securities not represented in the Underlying Index in anticipation of their addition to the Underlying Index.
The Fund may invest up to 20% of its net assets in investments not included in its Underlying Index, but which the Subadvisor believes will help the Fund track its Underlying Index. Such investments may include the use of one or more financial instruments, including but not limited to futures contracts and swap agreements (collectively, “Financial Instruments”). The Fund will not directly employ leverage in its investment strategies; nevertheless, the Fund may indirectly be leveraged if and to the extent the Fund invests in Financial Instruments to replicate an exposure to an inverse ETF that is leveraged.
In accordance with Rule 35d-1 under the Investment Company Act of 1940 (the “1940 Act”), the Fund has adopted a policy that it will, under normal circumstances, invest at least 80% of the value of its assets (net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in investments of the type suggested by the Fund’s name. Such policy is “non-fundamental,” which means that it may be changed without the vote of a majority
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of the Fund’s outstanding shares as defined in the 1940 Act. Such policies generally provide a fund’s shareholders with at least 60 days’ prior notice of any changes in a fund’s non-fundamental investment policy with respect to investments of the type suggested by its name. The Fund may count investments in underlying funds toward various guideline tests (such as the 80% test required under Rule 35d-1 under the 1940 Act).
The Fund has adopted a policy that it will, under normal circumstances, invest at least 80% of the value of its assets (net assets plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in high yield bonds.
The Fund’s investments are subject to certain requirements imposed by law and regulation, as well as the Fund’s investment strategy. These requirements are generally applied at the time the Fund invests its assets. If, subsequent to an investment by the Fund, this requirement is no longer met, the Fund’s future investments will be made in a manner that will bring the Fund into compliance with this requirement.
Additional Investment Strategies
In addition to its principal investment strategies, the Fund may also invest in money market instruments, including short-term debt instruments and repurchase agreements or other funds that invest exclusively in money market instruments (subject to applicable limitations under the 1940 Act, or exemptions therefrom), rather than Underlying Index Components, when it would be more efficient or less expensive for a Fund to do so, or as cover for Financial Instruments, for liquidity purposes, or to earn interest. Swaps and other Financial Instruments may be used by a Funds to seek performance that corresponds to its Underlying Index and to manage cash flows.
Borrowing Money
The Fund may borrow money from a bank as permitted by the 1940 Act or the rules thereunder, or by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) or other regulatory agency with authority over the Fund, but only for temporary or emergency purposes. The 1940 Act presently allows a fund to borrow from any bank (including pledging, mortgaging or hypothecating assets) in an amount up to 33 1/3% of its total assets (not including temporary borrowings not in excess of 5% of its total assets).
Securities Lending
The Fund may lend its portfolio securities. A securities lending program allows the Fund to receive a portion of the income generated by lending its securities and investing the respective collateral. In connection with such loans, the Fund receives liquid collateral equal to at least 102% (105% for foreign securities) of the value of the portfolio securities being lent. This collateral is marked to market on each trading day.
Description of the Principal Risks of the Fund
Investors in the Fund should carefully consider the risks of investing in the Fund as set forth in the Fund’s Summary Information section under “Principal Risks.”
Authorized Participant Concentration Risk
Only an Authorized Participant may engage in creation or redemption transactions directly with the Fund. Each Fund has a limited number of institutions that may act as Authorized Participants on an agency basis (i.e., on behalf of other market participants). To the extent that Authorized Participants exit the business or are unable to proceed with creation and/or redemption orders with the Fund and no other Authorized Participant is able to step forward to create or redeem Creation Units, Shares may be more likely to trade at a premium or discount to NAV and possibly face trading halts and/or delisting. This risk may be heightened for ETFs that invest in non-U.S. securities because such securities often involve greater settlement and operational issues for Authorized Participants that may further limit the availability of Authorized Participants.
Credit Risk
Credit risk is the risk that the issuer or guarantor of a debt instrument or the counterparty to a derivatives contract, repurchase agreement or loan of portfolio securities will be unable or unwilling to make its timely interest and/or principal payments or to otherwise honor its obligations. There are varying degrees of credit risk, depending on an issuer’s or counterparty’s financial condition and on the terms of an obligation, which may be reflected in the issuer’s or counterparty’s credit rating. There is the chance that the Fund’s portfolio holdings will have their credit ratings downgraded or will default (i.e., fail to make scheduled interest or principal payments), or that the market’s perception of an issuer’s or counterparty’s creditworthiness may worsen, potentially reducing the Fund’s income level or Share price. The value of an investment in the Fund may change quickly and without warning in response to issuer defaults, changes in the credit ratings of the Fund’s portfolio securities and/or perceptions related thereto.
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Cyber Security Risk
The Funds are susceptible to operational risks through breaches in cyber security. A breach in cyber security refers to both intentional and unintentional events that may cause a Fund to lose proprietary information, suffer data corruption or lose operational capacity. Such events could cause a Fund to incur regulatory penalties, reputational damage, additional compliance costs associated with corrective measures and/or financial loss. These risks typically are not covered by insurance. In general, cyber incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events. Cyber incidents include, but are not limited to, gaining unauthorized access to digital systems (e.g., through “hacking” or malicious software coding) for purposes of misappropriating assets or sensitive information, corrupting data or causing operational disruption. Cyber attacks may also be carried out in a manner that does not require gaining unauthorized access, such as causing denial-of-service attacks on websites (i.e., efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users). Cyber security failures by or breaches of the systems of security issuers, the Advisor, distributor and other service providers (including, but not limited to, sub-advisors, index providers, fund accountants, custodians, transfer agents and administrators), market makers, Authorized Participants or the issuers of securities in which a Fund invests, have the ability to cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with a Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV, disclosure of confidential trading information, impediments to trading, submission of erroneous trades or erroneous creation or redemption orders, the inability of a Fund or its service providers to transact business, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines and other penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs. Substantial costs may be incurred by a Fund in order to resolve or prevent cyber incidents in the future. While the Funds have established business continuity plans in the event of, and risk management systems to prevent, such cyber attacks, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems, including the possibility that certain risks have not been identified and that prevention and remediation efforts will not be successful. Furthermore, the Funds cannot control the cyber security plans and systems put in place by service providers to the Funds, issuers in which the Funds invest, Authorized Participants or market makers. There is no guarantee that such preventative efforts will succeed, and the Funds and their shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.
Debt Securities Risk
The risks of investing in debt securities include (without limitation): (i) credit risk, e.g., the issuer or guarantor of a debt security may be unable or unwilling (or be perceived as unable or unwilling) to make timely principal and/or interest payments or otherwise honor its obligations; (ii) interest rate risk, e.g., when interest rates go up, the value of a debt security generally goes down, and when interest rates go down, the value of a debt security generally goes up; (iii) liquidity risk and valuation risk, e.g., debt securities generally do not trade on a securities exchange, making them generally less liquid and more difficult to value than common stock; (iv) call risk and income risk, e.g., during a period of falling interest rates, the issuer may redeem a security by repaying it early, which may reduce a Fund’s income if the proceeds are reinvested at lower interest rates; and (v) extension risk, e.g., if interest rates rise, repayments of debt securities may occur more slowly than anticipated by the market, which may drive the prices of these securities down because their interest rates are lower than the current interest rate and the securities remain outstanding longer. Debt securities most frequently trade in institutional round lot size transactions. If the Fund purchases bonds in amounts less than the institutional round lot size, which are frequently referred to as “odd” lots, the odd lot size positions may have more price volatility than institutional round lot size positions. The Fund uses a third-party pricing service to value bond holdings and the pricing service values bonds assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size.
Derivatives Risk
Derivatives are investments whose value depends on (or is derived from) the value of an underlying instrument, such as a security, asset, reference rate or index and involve risks different from, and possibly greater than, the risks associated with other investments. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivatives transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset. Derivative prices are highly volatile and may fluctuate substantially during a short period of time. Such prices are influenced by numerous factors that affect the markets, including, but not limited to, changing supply and demand relationships, government programs and policies, national and international political and economic events, changes in interest rates, inflation and deflation, and changes in supply and demand relationships. Unlike other investments, derivative contracts often have leverage inherent in their terms. This leverage creates a disconnect between the initial amount of an investment relative to the risk assumed and introduces the
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possibility that a relatively small movement in the value of an underlying reference asset can result in an immediate and substantial loss to a party to a derivative contract. In general, the use of leveraged derivatives can magnify potential for gain or loss and, therefore, amplify the effects of market volatility on the Share price. The effects of leverage may also cause the Fund to liquidate portfolio positions when it would not be advantageous to do so in order to satisfy its obligations or to meet collateral segregation requirements. In the event of the bankruptcy or insolvency of a counterparty, the Fund could experience the loss of some or all of its investment in a derivative or experience delays in liquidating its positions, including declines in the value of its investment during the period in which the Fund seeks to enforce its rights, and an inability to realize any gains on its investment during such period. The Fund may also incur fees and expenses in enforcing its rights. Certain derivatives are subject to mandatory clearing. Central clearing is intended to reduce counterparty credit risk and increase liquidity, but central clearing does not make derivatives transactions risk-free.
Foreign Securities Risk
These additional risks include greater market volatility, the availability of less reliable financial information, higher transactional and custody costs, taxation by foreign governments, decreased market liquidity and political instability. Some countries and regions have experienced security concerns, war or threats of war and aggression, terrorism, economic uncertainty, natural and environmental disasters and/or systemic market dislocations that have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on the U.S. and world economies and markets generally. Foreign issuers are often subject to less stringent requirements regarding accounting, auditing, custody, financial reporting and record keeping than are U.S. issuers, and therefore not all material information will be available. Securities exchanges or foreign governments may adopt rules or regulations that may negatively impact the Fund’s ability to invest in foreign securities or may prevent the Fund from repatriating its investments. Non-U.S. transaction costs, such as brokerage commissions and custody costs, may be higher than in the United States. In some non-U.S. markets, custody arrangements for securities provide significantly less protection than custody arrangements in U.S. markets. Prevailing custody and trade settlement practices (e.g., the requirement to pay for securities prior to receipt) could similarly expose the Fund to credit and other risks it does not have in the United States with respect to participating brokers, custodians, clearing banks or other clearing agents, escrow agents and issuers. In addition, the Fund may not receive shareholder communications or be permitted to vote the securities it holds, as the issuers may be under no legal obligation to distribute them.
Less developed securities markets are more likely to experience problems with the clearing and settling of trades, as well as the holding of securities by local banks, agents and depositories. Low trading volumes and volatile prices in less developed markets make trades harder to complete and settle, and governments or trade groups may compel local agents to hold securities in designated depositories that are not subject to independent evaluation. Local agents are held only to the standards of care of their local markets. The less developed a country’s securities market is, the greater the likelihood of custody problems.
High Yield Securities Risk
The Fund’s investment in high yield securities, or “junk” bonds, may entail increased credit risks and the risk that the value of the Fund’s assets will decline, and may decline precipitously, with increases in interest rates. High yield securities are, under most circumstances, subject to greater market fluctuations and risk of loss of income and principal than are investments in lower-yielding, higher-rated debt securities. As interest rates rise, the value of high yield securities may decline precipitously. Increased rates may also indicate a slowdown in the economy, which may adversely affect the credit of issuers of high yield securities and result in a higher incidence of defaults among such issuers. A slowdown in the economy, or a development adversely affecting an issuer’s creditworthiness, may result in the issuer being unable to maintain earnings or sell assets at the rate and at the prices, respectively, that are required to produce sufficient cash flow to meet its interest and principal requirements. The Fund’s portfolio managers cannot predict future economic policies or their consequences or, therefore, the course or extent of any similar market fluctuations in the future. In addition, high yield securities are generally less liquid than investment grade securities.
Income Risk
The Fund’s income may decline when interest rates fall or if there are defaults in its portfolio. This decline can occur because the Fund may subsequently invest in lower-yielding securities when securities in its portfolio mature or the Fund otherwise needs to purchase additional securities.
Index Risk
There is no guarantee that the Fund’s investment results will have a high degree of correlation to those of its Underlying Index or that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Market disruptions and regulatory restrictions could have an adverse effect on the Fund’s ability to adjust its exposure to the required levels in
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order to track its Underlying Index. Errors in index data, index computations or the construction of the Underlying Index in accordance with its methodology may occur from time to time and may not be identified and corrected for a period of time or at all, which may have an adverse impact on the Fund and its shareholders. Apart from scheduled rebalances, the Underlying Index may undergo additional ad hoc rebalances in order, for example, to correct an error in the selection of index constituents. When the Fund’s Underlying Index is rebalanced and the Fund in turn rebalances its portfolio to attempt to increase the correlation between the Fund’s portfolio and the Underlying Index, any transaction costs and market exposure arising from such portfolio rebalancing will be borne directly by the Fund and its shareholders. Unscheduled rebalances to the Underlying Index may expose the Fund to additional tracking error risk, which is the risk that the Fund’s returns may not track those of the Underlying Index. Therefore, index errors and additional ad hoc rebalances may increase the costs to and the tracking error risk of the Fund.
In constructing an Underlying Index, the Index Provider may utilize quantitative models or methodologies that may be proprietary or developed by third-parties. These models and methodologies are used to determine the composition of the Underlying Index and may not adequately take into account certain factors, resulting in a decline in the value of the Underlying Index and, therefore, the Fund. Models rely on accurate financial and market data inputs. If inaccurate data is entered into a model, the resulting information will be incorrect. In addition, the models used by be predictive and nature and such models may result in an incorrect assessment of future events. The models evaluate securities or securities markets based on certain assumptions concerning the interplay of market factors. The markets or prices of individual securities may be affected by factors not foreseen in developing the models. The historical correlations and relationships between individual securities or asset classes, upon which a model may be based, may not continue in the future.
Industry/Sector Concentration Risk
The Fund’s investment of a large percentage of its assets in the securities of issuers within the same industry or sector means that an adverse economic, business or political development may affect the value of the Fund’s investments more than if the Fund were more broadly diversified. A concentration makes the Fund more susceptible to any single occurrence and may subject the Fund to greater market risk than a fund that is not so concentrated.
Communication Services Sector Risk. Communication services companies may be affected by legislative or regulatory changes, adverse market conditions, and/or increased competition. Rapid advancements in technology, innovation of competitors, product obsolescence and government regulation make communication services companies particularly vulnerable. Communication services companies also rely on the use of intellectual property such as patents, copyrights and trademarks owned internationally or licensed through third-parties. Infringement of intellectual property claims could have an adverse effect on the company. Changes in domestic and international demand, shifting demographics and unpredictable changes in consumer tastes can drastically affect a communication services company’s profitability. While all companies may be susceptible to network security breaches, certain communication services companies may be particular targets of hacking and potential theft of proprietary or consumer information or disruptions in service, which could have a material adverse effect on their businesses.
Financials Sector Risk. Companies in the financials sector, including retail and commercial banks, insurance companies and financial services companies, may be adversely impacted by many factors, including, among others, government regulations, economic conditions, credit rating downgrades, changes in currency exchange rates, volatile interest rates, decreased liquidity in credit markets and competition from new entrants. Profitability of these companies is largely dependent on the availability and cost of capital and can fluctuate significantly when interest rates change. Credit losses resulting from financial difficulties of borrowers also can negatively impact the sector. Companies in the financials sector are often subject to extensive governmental regulation and intervention, which may adversely affect the scope of their activities, the prices they can charge and the amount of capital they must maintain. Governmental regulation may change frequently and may have significant adverse consequences for companies in the financials sector, including effects not intended by such regulation. The impact of recent or future regulation in various countries on any individual financial company or on the sector as a whole cannot be predicted. Certain risks may impact the value of investments in the financials sector more severely than those of investments outside this sector, including the risks associated with companies that operate with substantial financial leverage. Companies in the financials sector may also be adversely affected by increases in interest rates and loan losses, decreases in the availability of money or asset valuations and adverse
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conditions in other related markets. Insurance companies, in particular, may be subject to severe price competition and/or rate regulation, which may have an adverse impact on their profitability. The financials sector has been subject to increased scrutiny by international regulators and future regulations could be imposed that would have an adverse economic impact on financial companies. Recently, the financials sector has been prone to cyber attacks and technology malfunctions and failures, which have caused losses to financial companies.
Interest Rate Risk
An increase in interest rates may cause the value of certain fixed income securities held by the Fund to decline. Many factors can cause interest rates to rise, such as central bank monetary policies, inflation rates, general economic conditions and expectations about the foregoing. Fixed income securities with longer durations tend to be more sensitive to changes in interest rates, making them more volatile than securities with shorter durations or floating or adjustable interest rates. Duration is a measure used to determine the sensitivity of a fixed income security’s price to changes in interest rates. For example, the value of a fixed income security with a duration of three years would be expected to decrease by 3% for every 1% increase in interest rates. The negative impact on the Fund from potential interest rate increases could be swift and significant, including falling market values, increased redemptions and reduced liquidity. Substantial shareholder redemptions may worsen this impact. An increase in interest rates could also cause principal payments on a fixed income security to be repaid at a slower rate than expected. This risk is particularly prevalent for a callable debt security where an increase in interest rates could cause the issuer of that security to not redeem the security as anticipated on the call date, effectively lengthening the security’s expected maturity, in turn making that security more vulnerable to interest rate risk and reducing its market value. The Fund may be subject to a greater risk of rising interest rates than would normally be the case due to the current period of historically low rates and the effect of potential government fiscal policy initiatives and resulting market reaction to those initiatives.
When interest rates rise, certain obligations will be paid off by the issuer (or other obligated party) more slowly than anticipated, causing the value of these securities to fall. Rising interest rates tend to extend the duration of fixed income securities, making their market value more sensitive to changes in interest rates. As a result, in a period of rising interest rates, securities may exhibit additional volatility and may lose value. The value of securities with longer maturities generally changes more in response to changes in interest rates than does the value of securities with shorter maturities. Extension risk is particularly prevalent for a callable fixed income security where an increase in interest rates could result in the issuer of that security choosing not to redeem the security as anticipated on the security’s call date. Such a decision by the issuer could have the effect of lengthening the security’s expected maturity, making it more vulnerable to interest rate risk and reducing its market value.
Some securities may be redeemed at the option of the issuer, or “called,” before their stated maturity date. In general, an issuer will call its debt securities if they can be refinanced by issuing new debt securities which bear a lower interest rate. The Fund is subject to the possibility that during periods of falling interest rates an issuer will call its high-yielding debt securities. The Fund may then be forced to invest the unanticipated proceeds in securities with lower yields, resulting in a decline in the Fund’s income, or in securities with greater risks or with other less favorable features. Such redemptions and subsequent reinvestments would also increase the Fund’s portfolio turnover. If a called debt security was purchased by the Fund at a premium, the value of the premium may be lost in the event of a redemption.
The terms of floating rate notes and other instruments may be tied to the London Interbank Offered Rate (“LIBOR”), which functions as a reference rate or benchmark. It is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued at the end of 2021, which may cause increased volatility and illiquidity in the markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR or other adverse consequences, such as decreased yields and reduction in value, for these instruments. These events may adversely affect the Fund and its investments in such instruments. For more information on the risks associated with the discontinuation and transition of LIBOR, please see “LIBOR Replacement Risk.”
Investment Style Risk
The Underlying Index seeks to allocate investment exposure based upon a particular style of investing. Different investment styles tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions and investor sentiment. As a consequence, the Fund may underperform as compared to the market generally or to other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles. Further, there is no guarantee that the Underlying Index will accurately or optimally utilize the investment style or that it will successfully provide the desired investment exposure.
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Low Volatility Investing Style Risk. While the Fund seeks to invest in securities exhibiting lower levels of volatility, there is no guarantee it will successfully do so. The value of the securities in the Fund’s portfolio may fluctuate, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably. The prices may not be any less volatile than the market as a whole, and could be more volatile. During periods of market expansion, an investment portfolio comprised of low volatility securities may underperform. Low volatility securities may go in and out of favor over time.
Liquidity Risk
Liquidity risk exists when particular investments are difficult to purchase or sell. To the extent the Fund invests in illiquid securities or securities that become less liquid, such investments may have a negative effect on the returns of the Fund because the Fund may be unable to sell the illiquid securities at an advantageous time or price. Securities with substantial market and/or credit risk may be especially susceptible to liquidity risk. Liquidity risk may be the result of, among other things, an investment being subject to restrictions on resale, trading over-the-counter or in limited volume, or lacking an active trading market. Liquid investments may become illiquid or less liquid after purchase by the Fund, particularly during periods of market turmoil or economic uncertainty. Illiquid and relatively less liquid investments may be harder to value, especially in changing markets. If the Fund is forced to sell underlying investments at reduced prices or under unfavorable conditions to meet redemption requests or for other cash needs, the Fund may suffer a loss. This may be magnified in a rising interest rate environment or under other circumstances where redemptions from the Fund may be higher than normal. It may also be the case that other market participants may be attempting to liquidate similar holdings at the same time as the Fund, causing increased supply in the market and contributing to liquidity risk and downward pricing pressure. There can be no assurance that a security that is deemed to be liquid when purchased will continue to be liquid or as long as it is held by the Fund.
Market Risk
The value of the Fund’s investments may fluctuate and/or decline because of changes in the markets in which the Fund invests, which could cause the Fund to underperform other funds with similar investment objectives and strategies. Security markets are volatile and may decline significantly in response to adverse issuer, regulatory, political, or economic developments. Different sectors of the market and different security types may react differently to such developments. Changes in these markets may be rapid and unpredictable. Fluctuations in the markets generally or in a specific industry or sector may impact the securities in which the Fund invests. From time to time, markets may experience periods of stress for potentially prolonged periods that may result in: (i) increased market volatility; (ii) reduced market liquidity; and (iii) increased redemptions of Fund Shares. Such conditions may add significantly to the risk of volatility in the NAV of the Fund’s Shares and the market prices at which Shares of the Fund trade on a securities exchange. During periods of market stress Shares of the Fund may also experience significantly wider “bid/ask” spreads and premiums and discounts between the Fund’s NAV and market price.
Market changes may impact equity and fixed income securities in different and, at times, conflicting manners. The Fund potentially will be prevented from executing investment decisions at an advantageous time or price as a result of any domestic or global market disruptions, particularly disruptions causing heightened market volatility and reduced market liquidity, as well as increased or changing regulations or market closures. Thus, investments that the Advisor or Subadvisor believes best enable the Fund to track the performance of its Underlying Index may be unavailable entirely or in the specific quantities sought by the Advisor or Subadvisor and the Fund may need to obtain the exposure through less advantageous or indirect investments or forgo the investment at the time. Securities and investments included as components of the Underlying Index may be susceptible to declines in value, including declines in value that are not believed to be representative of the issuer’s value or fundamentals, due to investor reactions to such events. In response to market volatility and disruption, the Underlying Index may delay rebalancing, implement temporary or permanent modifications to its methodology or take other actions.
Political and diplomatic events within the United States and abroad, such as the U.S. budget and deficit reduction plans, protectionist measures, trade tensions central bank policy and government intervention in the economy, has in the past resulted, and may in the future result, in developments that present additional risks to the Fund’s investments and operations. Geopolitical and other events, such as war, acts of terrorism, natural disasters, the spread of infectious illnesses, epidemics and pandemics, environmental and other public health issues, recessions or other events, and governments’ reactions to such events, may lead to increased market volatility and instability in world economies and markets generally and may have adverse effects on the
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performance of the Fund and its investments. Additional and/or prolonged geopolitical or other events may affect investor and consumer confidence and may adversely impact financial markets and the broader economy, perhaps suddenly and to a significant degree. Any such market, economic and other disruptions could also prevent the Fund from executing its investment strategies and processes in a timely manner.
An investment in the Fund is not a deposit in a bank and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation or any other government agency. When you sell your Shares, they could be worth less than what you paid for them.
Market Disruption Risk and Recent Market Events
Geopolitical and other events, including war, terrorism, economic uncertainty, trade disputes, public health crises and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to disruptions in the US and world economies and markets, which may increase financial market volatility and have significant adverse direct or indirect effects on the Fund and its investments. Market disruptions could cause the Fund to lose money, experience significant redemptions, and encounter operational difficulties. Although multiple asset classes may be affected by a market disruption, the duration and effects may not be the same for all types of assets. Recent market disruption events include the pandemic spread of the novel coronavirus known as COVID-19, and the significant restrictions, market volatility, decreased economic and other activity and increased government activity that it has caused. Specifically, COVID-19 has led to significant death and morbidity, and concerns about its further spread have resulted in the closing of schools and non-essential businesses, cancellations, shelter-in-place orders, lower consumer spending in certain sectors, social distancing, bans on large social gatherings and travel, quarantines, government economic stimulus measures, reduced productivity, rapid increases in unemployment, increased demand for and strain on government and medical resources, border closings and global trade and supply chain interruptions, among others. The full effects, duration and costs of the COVID-19 pandemic are impossible to predict, and the circumstances surrounding the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to evolve. The pandemic may affect certain countries, industries, economic sectors, companies and investment products more than others, may exacerbate existing economic, political, or social tensions and may increase the probability of an economic recession or depression. The Fund and its investments may be adversely affected by the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and a prolonged pandemic may result in the Fund and its service providers experiencing operational difficulties in coordinating a remote workforce and implementing their business continuity plans, among others.
Operational Risk
The Fund is exposed to operational risks arising from a number of factors, including, but not limited to, human error, processing and communication errors, errors of the Fund’s service providers, counterparties or other third-parties, failed or inadequate processes and technology or systems failures. The Fund, Advisor and Subadvisor seek to reduce these operational risks through controls and procedures. However, these measures do not address every possible risk and may be inadequate to address significant operational risks
Passive Management Risk
The Fund is not actively managed and instead seeks to track the performance of an index. Passive management has the following risks associated with it:

The Fund invests in the securities included in, or representative of, the Underlying Index. The Index Provider or the index calculation agent may make errors. The Index Provider may include index constituents that should have been excluded, or it may exclude index constituents that should have been included. It also may include or exclude constituents at incorrect levels. This may result in the Fund, in turn, being correctly positioned to an index that has been incorrectly calculated. This could lead to losses to the Fund.

In seeking to track the Underlying Index’s performance, the Fund may be subject to tracking error, which is the divergence of the Fund’s performance from that of the Underlying Index. Tracking error may occur because of differences between the securities and other instruments held in the Fund’s portfolio and those included in the Underlying Index, pricing differences (including, as applicable, differences between a security’s price at the local market close and the Fund’s valuation of a security at the time of calculation of the Fund’s NAV), differences in transaction costs, the Fund’s holding of uninvested cash, differences in timing of the accrual of or the valuation of dividends or interest, the requirements to maintain pass-through tax treatment, portfolio transactions carried out to minimize the distribution of capital gains to shareholders, changes to the Underlying Index or the costs to the Fund of complying with various new or existing regulatory requirements. Tracking error also may result because the Fund
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incurs fees and expenses, while the Underlying Index does not. This risk may be heightened during times of increased market volatility or other unusual market conditions. Funds that track indices with significant weight in high yield securities may experience higher tracking error than other index ETFs that do not track such indices.
Portfolio Turnover Risk
The Fund’s strategy may frequently involve buying and selling portfolio securities to rebalance the Fund’s investment exposures. High portfolio turnover may result in the Fund paying higher levels of transaction costs and generating greater tax liabilities for shareholders. Portfolio turnover risk may cause the Fund’s performance to be less than expected.
Secondary Market Trading Risk
Although the Fund’s Shares are listed for trading on one or more securities exchanges, there can be no assurance that an active trading market for such Shares will develop or be maintained by market makers or Authorized Participants. The trading of Shares on securities exchanges is subject to the risk of irregular trading activity. Additionally, market makers are under no obligation to make a market in the Fund’s Shares and Authorized Participants are not obligated to submit purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units. In the event market makers cease making a market in the Fund’s Shares or Authorized Participants stop submitting purchase or redemption orders for Creation Units, the Fund’s Shares may trade at a larger premium or discount to its NAV. Wide bid-ask spreads and large premiums or discounts to NAV are likely to lead to an investor buying his or her Shares at a market price that is more than their value, and selling those Shares at a market price that is less than their value.
Buying or selling Shares on an exchange involves two types of costs that apply to all securities transactions. When buying or selling Shares through a broker, you will likely incur a brokerage commission and other charges. In addition, you may incur the cost of the “spread” — the difference between what investors are willing to pay for Shares (the “bid” price) and the price at which they are willing to sell Fund shares (the “ask” price). The spread, which varies over time for Shares based on trading volume and market liquidity, is generally narrower if the Fund has more trading volume and market liquidity and wider if the Fund has less trading volume and market liquidity. The risk of wide bid and ask spreads may be especially pronounced for smaller funds. In addition, increased market volatility may cause wider spreads. There may also be regulatory and other charges that are incurred as a result of trading activity. Because of the costs inherent in buying or selling Shares, frequent trading may detract significantly from investment results and an investment in Shares may not be advisable for investors who anticipate regularly making small investments through a brokerage account.
Securities exchanges have requirements that must be met in order for Shares to be listed. There can be no assurance that the requirements of an exchange necessary to maintain the listing of Shares will continue to be met. This risk is particularly acute for funds that fail to attract a large number of shareholders. Pursuant to an exchange’s “circuit breaker” rules, trading in a Fund’s Shares may be halted due to extraordinary market volatility.
Trading Price Risk
Shares of the Fund trade on securities exchanges at prices at, above or below the Fund’s most recent NAV. The NAV of the Fund is calculated at the end of each business day and fluctuates with changes in the market value of the Fund’s holdings. The trading price of the Shares fluctuates continuously throughout trading hours based on both market supply of and demand for Shares and the Fund’s NAV. As a result, the trading prices of the Shares may deviate significantly from NAV during periods of market volatility. The market price of the Shares during the trading day, like the price of any exchange-traded security, includes a “bid/ask” spread charged by the exchange specialist, market makers or other participants that trade the Shares. In times of severe market disruption, the bid/ask spread can increase significantly. At those times, Shares are most likely to be traded at a discount to NAV, and the discount is likely to be greatest when the price of Shares is falling fastest, which may be the time that an investor most wants to sell their Shares. Although it is generally expected that the market price of the Shares will approximate the Fund’s NAV, there may be times when the market price and the NAV vary significantly. Thus, an investor may pay more than NAV when purchasing Shares and receive less than NAV when selling Shares. While the creation/redemption feature is designed to make it more likely that the Shares normally will trade on securities exchanges at prices close to the Fund’s next calculated NAV, exchange prices are not expected to correlate exactly with the Fund’s NAV due to timing reasons, supply and demand imbalances and other factors. In addition, disruptions to creations and redemptions, including disruptions at market makers, Authorized Participants, or other market participants, and during periods of significant market
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volatility, may result in trading prices for Shares that differ significantly from its NAV. Authorized Participants may be less willing to create or redeem Shares if there is a lack of an active market for such Shares or its underlying investments, which may contribute to the Fund’s Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV. Additionally, similar to shares of other issuers listed on a securities exchange, the Shares may be sold short and are therefore subject to the risk of increased volatility and price decreases associated with being sold short. Any of these factors, among others, may lead to the Shares trading at a premium or discount to NAV.
Valuation Risk
Independent market quotations for certain investments held by a Fund may not be readily available, and such investments may be fair valued or valued by a pricing service at an evaluated price. These valuations involve subjectivity and different market participants may assign different prices to the same investment. As a result, there is a risk that a Fund may not be able to sell an investment at the price assigned to the investment by the Fund. In addition, the value of the securities or other assets in a Fund’s portfolio may change on days or during time periods when shareholders will not be able to purchase or sell the Fund’s Shares. Authorized Participants who purchase or redeem Shares on days when a Fund is holding fair-valued securities may receive fewer or more shares, or lower or higher redemption proceeds, than they would have received had the Fund not fair-valued securities or used a different valuation methodology. A Fund’s ability to value investments may be impacted by technological issues or errors by pricing services or other third-party service providers.
Additional Risks
Large Investments Risk
From time to time, the Fund may receive large purchase or redemption orders from affiliated or unaffiliated funds or other investors. In addition, any third-party investor, investment advisor affiliate, authorized participant, lead market maker or other entity may make a large investment in the Fund and hold its investment for any number of reasons, including to facilitate such Fund’s commencement of operations or to facilitate the Fund’s achieving a specified size or scale. There can be no assurance that any large shareholder would not sell or redeem its investment at any given time, either in a single transaction or over time.
These large transactions, and particularly redemptions, could have adverse effects on the Fund, including: (i) negative impacts to performance if the Fund were required to sell securities, invest cash or hold significant cash at times when it otherwise would not do so; (ii) wider price spreads or greater premiums/discounts that could materialize as a result of lower secondary market volume of shares; and (iii) negative federal income tax consequences if this activity accelerated the realization of capital gains.
LIBOR Replacement Risk
The terms of floating rate loans, financings or other transactions in the U.S. and globally have been historically tied to LIBOR, which functions as a reference rate or benchmark for various commercial and financial contracts. LIBOR may be a significant factor in determining payment obligations under derivatives transactions, the cost of financing of a Fund’s investments or the value or return on certain other Fund investments. As a result, LIBOR may be relevant to, and directly affect, a Fund’s performance. The Financial Conduct Authority, the United Kingdom’s financial regulatory body and regulator of LIBOR, has announced that after 2021 it will cease its active encouragement of banks to provide the quotations needed to sustain LIBOR due to the absence of an active market for interbank unsecured lending and other reasons. However, it is possible that certain LIBOR tenors may continue beyond 2021 and the most widely used LIBOR tenors may continue until mid-2023. As a result, it is anticipated that LIBOR will be discontinued or will no longer be sufficiently robust to be representative of its underlying market around that time. Various financial industry groups have begun planning for that transition and certain regulators and industry groups have taken actions to establish alternative reference rates (e.g., the Secured Overnight Financing Rate, which measures the cost of overnight borrowings through repurchase agreement transactions collateralized with U.S. Treasury securities and is intended to replace U.S. dollar LIBOR with certain adjustments). However, there are challenges to converting certain contracts and transactions to a new benchmark and neither the full effects of the transition process nor its ultimate outcome is known.
The transition process might lead to increased volatility and illiquidity in markets for instruments with terms tied to LIBOR. It could also lead to a reduction in the interest rates on, and the value of, some LIBOR-based investments and reduce the effectiveness of hedges mitigating risk in connection with LIBOR-based investments. Although some LIBOR-based instruments may contemplate a scenario where LIBOR is no longer available by providing for an alternative rate-setting methodology and/or increased costs for certain LIBOR-related instruments or
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financing transactions, others may not have such provisions and there may be significant uncertainty regarding the effectiveness of any such alternative methodologies. Instruments that include robust fallback provisions to facilitate the transition from LIBOR to an alternative reference rate may also include adjustments that do not adequately compensate the holder for the different characteristics of the alternative reference rate. The result may be that the fallback provision results in a value transfer from one party to the instrument to the counterparty. Additionally, because such provisions may differ across instruments (e.g., hedges versus cash positions hedged), LIBOR’s cessation may give rise to basis risk and render hedges less effective. As the usefulness of LIBOR as a benchmark could deteriorate during the transition period, these effects and related adverse conditions could occur prior to the end of 2021 with respect to certain LIBOR tenors or mid-2023 for the remaining LIBOR tenors. There also remains uncertainty and risk regarding the willingness and ability of issuers to include enhanced provisions in new and existing contracts or instruments, notwithstanding significant efforts by the industry to develop robust LIBOR replacement clauses. The effect of any changes to, or discontinuation of, LIBOR on a Fund will vary depending, among other things, on (1) existing fallback or termination provisions in individual contracts and the possible renegotiation of existing contracts and (2) whether, how, and when industry participants develop and adopt new reference rates and fallbacks for both legacy and new products and instruments. A Fund’s investments may also be tied to other interbank offered rates and currencies, which also will likely face similar issues. In many cases, in the event that an instrument falls back to an alternative reference rate, including the Secured Overnight Financing Rate, the alternative reference rate will not perform the same as LIBOR because the alternative reference rate does not include a credit sensitive component in the calculation of the rate. Alternative reference rates generally reflect the performance of the market for U.S. treasury securities, which are secured by the U.S. treasury, and not the inter-bank lending markets. In the event of a credit crisis, floating rate instruments using certain alternative reference rates could therefore perform differently than those instruments using a rate indexed to the inter-bank lending market.
Various pending legislation, including in the U.S. Congress and the New York state legislature, may affect the transition of LIBOR-based instruments as well by permitting trustees and calculation agents to transition instruments with no LIBOR transition language to an alternative reference rate selected by such agents. Those legislative proposals include safe harbors from liability, which may limit the recourse a Fund may have if the alternative reference rate does not fully compensate the Fund for the transition of an instrument from LIBOR. It is uncertain whether such legislative proposals will be signed into law.
These developments could negatively impact financial markets in general and present heightened risks, including with respect to a Fund’s investments. As a result of this uncertainty and developments relating to the transition process, a Fund and its investments may be adversely affected.
Securities Lending Risk
Securities lending involves the risk that the borrower of the loaned securities fails to return the securities in a timely manner or at all. The Fund could also lose money due to a decline in the value of collateral provided for loaned securities or any investments made with cash collateral. These events could also trigger adverse tax consequences for the Fund. To the extent the collateral provided or investments made with cash collateral differ from securities included in the Fund’s Underlying Index, such collateral or investments may have a greater risk of loss than the securities included in the Underlying Index.
Underinvestment Risk
If certain aggregate ownership thresholds are reached either through the actions of the Advisor and its affiliates or the Fund, or as a result of third-party transactions, the ability of the Advisor on behalf of clients (including the Fund) to purchase or dispose of investments, or exercise rights or undertake business transactions, may be restricted by regulation or otherwise impaired. The capacity of the Fund to make investments in certain securities may be affected by the relevant limits, and such limitations may have adverse effects on the liquidity and performance of the Fund’s portfolio holdings compared to the performance of the Underlying Index. This may increase the risk of the Fund being underinvested to the Underlying Index and increase the risk of tracking error.
U.S. Tax Risk
To qualify for the favorable U.S. federal income tax treatment accorded to regulated investment companies, the Fund must satisfy certain income, asset diversification and distribution requirements. If for any taxable year, the Fund does not qualify as a regulated investment company, all of its taxable income (including its net
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capital gain) for that year would be subject to tax at regular corporate rates without any deduction for distributions to its shareholders, and such distributions would be taxable to its shareholders as dividend income to the extent of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits.
The tax treatment of certain derivatives is unclear for purposes of determining the Fund’s tax status. In addition, the Fund’s transactions in financial instruments, including, but not limited to, options, futures contracts, hedging transactions, forward contracts and swap contracts, will be subject to special tax rules (which may include mark-to-market, constructive sale, wash sale and short sale rules), the effect of which may be to accelerate income to the Fund, defer losses to the Fund, cause adjustments in the holding periods of the Fund’s securities, convert long-term capital gains into short-term capital gains or convert short-term capital losses into long-term capital losses. These rules could, therefore, affect the amount, timing and character of distributions to the Fund’s shareholders. The Fund’s use of such transactions may result in the Fund realizing more short-term capital gains and ordinary income, in each case subject to U.S. federal income tax at higher ordinary income tax rates, than it would if it did not engage in such transactions.
Buying and Selling Shares in the Secondary Market
Most investors will buy and sell Shares of the Fund in Secondary Market transactions through brokers. Shares of the Fund will be listed for trading on the Secondary Market on the NYSE Arca. Shares can be bought and sold throughout the trading day like other publicly-traded shares. Unless imposed by your broker or dealer, there is no minimum dollar amount you must invest and no minimum number of Shares you must buy in the Secondary Market. When buying or selling Shares through a broker, you will incur customary brokerage commissions and charges, and you may pay some or all of the spread between the bid and the offered price in the Secondary Market on each leg of a round trip (purchase and sale) transaction. In addition, because transactions in the Secondary Market occur at market prices, you may pay more than NAV when you buy Shares and receive less than NAV when you sell those Shares.
Share prices are reported in dollars and cents per Share. For information about buying and selling Shares in the Secondary Market, please contact your broker or dealer.
Book Entry
Shares of the Fund are held in book-entry form and no stock certificates are issued. DTC, through its nominee Cede & Co., is the record owner of all outstanding Shares.
Investors owning Shares are beneficial owners as shown on the records of DTC or its participants. DTC serves as the securities depository for all Shares. Participants in DTC include securities brokers and dealers, banks, trust companies, clearing corporations and other institutions that directly or indirectly maintain a custodial relationship with DTC. As a beneficial owner of Shares, you are not entitled to receive physical delivery of stock certificates or to have Shares registered in your name, and you are not considered a registered owner of Shares. Therefore, to exercise any right as an owner of Shares, you must rely upon the procedures of DTC and its participants.
These procedures are the same as those that apply to any securities that you hold in book-entry or “street name” form for any publicly-traded company. Specifically, in the case of a shareholder meeting of the Fund, DTC assigns applicable Cede & Co. voting rights to its participants that have Shares credited to their accounts on the record date, issues an omnibus proxy and forwards the omnibus proxy to the Fund. The omnibus proxy transfers the voting authority from Cede & Co. to the DTC participant. This gives the DTC participant through whom you own Shares (namely, your broker, dealer, bank, trust company or other nominee) authority to vote the shares, and, in turn, the DTC participant is obligated to follow the voting instructions you provide.
Management
The Board is responsible for the general supervision of the Fund. The Board appoints officers who are responsible for the day-to-day operations of the Fund.
Investment Advisor
The Advisor has been registered as an investment advisor with the SEC since August 2007, has provided investment advisory services to registered investment companies since June 2008, and is a wholly-owned indirect subsidiary of New York Life Investment Management Holdings LLC. The Advisor’s principal office is located at 51 Madison Avenue, New York, New York 10010. As of June 30, 2021, the Advisor had approximately $4.7 billion in assets under management.
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The Advisor has overall responsibility for the general management and administration of the Trust. The Advisor provides an investment program for the Fund and supervises the Subadvisor in managing the investment portfolio of the Fund. The Advisor has arranged for custody, fund administration, transfer agency and all other non-distribution related services necessary for the Fund to operate.
As compensation for its services and its assumption of certain expenses, the Fund pays the Advisor a management fee equal to 0.40% of the Fund’s average daily net assets that is calculated daily and paid monthly. The Advisor may voluntarily waive any portion of its advisory fee from time to time, and may discontinue or modify any such voluntary limitations in the future at its discretion.
The Advisor serves as investment advisor to the Fund pursuant to an Investment Advisory Agreement (the “Advisory Agreement”) and the Subadvisor serves as investment subadvisor to the Fund pursuant to an Investment Subadvisory Agreement (the “Subadvisory Agreement”). The Advisory Agreement and Subadvisory Agreement were approved by the Independent Trustees of the Trust. The basis for the Trustees’ approval of the Advisory Agreement and Subadvisory Agreement are available in the Trust’s Annual or Semiannual Report to shareholders.
Under the Advisory Agreement, the Advisor agrees to pay all expenses of the Trust, except brokerage and other transaction expenses including taxes; extraordinary legal fees or expenses, such as those for litigation or arbitration; compensation and expenses of the Independent Trustees, counsel to the Independent Trustees, and the Trust’s chief compliance officer; extraordinary expenses; distribution fees and expenses paid by the Trust under any distribution plan adopted pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act; and the advisory fee payable to the Advisor hereunder.
The Advisor and its affiliates deal, trade and invest for their own accounts in the types of securities in which the Fund also may invest. The Advisor does not use inside information in making investment decisions on behalf of the Fund.
Section 15(a) of the 1940 Act requires that all contracts pursuant to which persons serve as investment advisors to investment companies be approved by shareholders. As interpreted, this requirement also applies to the appointment of subadvisors to the Fund. The Advisor and the Trust have obtained an exemptive order (the “Order”) from the SEC permitting the Advisor, on behalf of the Fund and subject to the approval of the Board, including a majority of the Independent Trustees, to hire or terminate unaffiliated subadvisors and to modify any existing or future subadvisory agreement with unaffiliated subadvisors without shareholder approval. This authority is subject to certain conditions. The Fund will notify shareholders and provide them with certain information required by the Order within 90 days of hiring a new subadvisor. The Fund’s sole shareholder has approved the use of the Order. Please see the SAI for more information on the Order.
Expense Limitation Agreement
The Advisor has entered into an Expense Limitation Agreement with the Fund under which it has agreed to waive or reduce its fees and to assume other expenses of the Fund in an amount that limits “Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses” ​(exclusive of interest, taxes, brokerage fees and commissions, dividends paid on short sales, acquired fund fees and expenses, and extraordinary expenses) to not more than 0.40% of the average daily net assets of the Fund for the twelve months ending August 31, 2022.
Subadvisor
Pursuant to an investment subadvisory agreement with the Advisor, MacKay Shields LLC serves as the subadvisor to the Fund and makes investment decisions, and buys and sells securities for the Fund. Under the supervision of the Advisor, the Subadvisor is responsible for making the specific decisions about the following: (i) buying, selling and holding securities; (ii) selecting brokers and brokerage firms to trade for them; (iii) maintaining accurate records; and, if possible, (iv) negotiating favorable commissions and fees with the brokers and brokerage firms. For these services, the Subadvisor is paid a monthly fee by the Advisor out of the Advisor’s management fee, not the Fund. See the SAI for a breakdown of fees. To the extent that the Advisor has agreed to waive its management fee or reimburse expenses, the Subadvisor has agreed to waive or reimburse its fee proportionately. The basis for the Board’s approval of the Subadvisory Agreement is available in the Trust’s Annual report to shareholders.
The Subadvisor was incorporated in 1969 as an independent investment advisory firm and has been registered as an investment advisor with the SEC since 1969. The Subadvisor was privately held until 1984 when it became a wholly-owned subsidiary of New York Life. The Subadvisor’s principal office is located at 1345 Avenue of the Americas, New York, New York 10105. As of June 30, 2021, the Subadvisor had approximately $161.85 billion in assets under management.
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Portfolio Management
The portfolio managers primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Fund are Alexandra Wilson-Elizondo and Eric Gold.
Ms. Wilson-Elizondo has served as a portfolio manager for the Fund since its inception. Ms. Wilson-Elizondo is the Deputy Head of Global Credit and a senior portfolio manager. She is a member of the Investment Policy Committee and of the firm’s Responsible Investment Committee. Ms. Wilson-Elizondo serves as a portfolio manager for the Investment Grade Credit, High Yield and ESG strategies, as well as Index and ETF products. She joined the firm’s Global Fixed Income team in June 2015. Prior to joining MacKay Shields, she spent seven years at Vanguard as a Manager on the Taxable Money Market Desk and as Head of Corporate Credit Risk for Vanguard’s fixed income index funds. Alexandra received a BA from Haverford College and an MBA from NYU’s Stern School of Business. She has been in the investment industry since 2008.
Mr. Gold is the Head of the Global Credit team, Co-Head of the Credit Committee and a member of the Investment Policy Committee. Mr. Gold is responsible for leadership and oversight of the team’s strategies, spanning high yield, loans and investment grade credit. Before joining the Global Credit team, Mr. Gold served as a Managing Director on the MacKay High Yield team. Over his tenure at MacKay Shields, Mr. Gold has been active in credit analysis and portfolio construction, covering a wide array of industry sectors across the credit universe. Prior to joining MacKay Shields in 2010, he was a sell-side Analyst covering the telecommunications, cable and media sectors at Sterne Agee & Leach, Inc. Previously, he was an Analyst at BlackRock and a sell-side Analyst at Grantchester Securities where he was ranked by Institutional Investor as the #1 analyst in the wireless telecommunications sector for 1999, 2000, 2001 and 2002. Mr. Gold received a BA from Vassar College and an MBA from New York University. He has been working in the investment industry since 1987.
For more information about the portfolio managers’ compensation, other accounts managed by the portfolio managers and the portfolio managers’ ownership of securities in the Fund, see the SAI.
Other Service Providers
Index Provider
S&P Opco LLC, located at 55 Water Street, New York, New York 10041, developed and sponsors the Underlying Index.
The “S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index” is a product of S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC or its affiliates (“SPDJI”) and has been licensed for use by IndexIQ Advisors LLC. Standard & Poor’s® and S&P® are registered trademarks of Standard & Poor’s Financial Services LLC (“S&P”) and Dow Jones® is a registered trademark of Dow Jones Trademark Holdings LLC (“Dow Jones”). The trademarks have been licensed to SPDJI and have been sublicensed for use for certain purposes by IndexIQ Advisors LLC. IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF is not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by SPDJI, Dow Jones, S&P, any of their respective affiliates (collectively, “S&P Dow Jones Indices”). S&P Dow Jones Indices makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of the IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities generally or in IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF particularly or the ability of the S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index to track general market performance. S&P Dow Jones Indices’ only relationship to IndexIQ Advisors LLC with respect to the S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index is the licensing of the Index and certain trademarks, service marks and/or trade names of S&P Dow Jones Indices and/or its licensors. The S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index is determined, composed and calculated by S&P Dow Jones Indices without regard to IndexIQ Advisors LLC or the IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF. S&P Dow Jones Indices has no obligation to take the needs of IndexIQ Advisors LLC or the owners of IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF into consideration in determining, composing or calculating the S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index. S&P Dow Jones Indices is responsible for and have not participated in the determination of the prices, and amount of IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF or the timing of the issuance or sale of IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF or in the determination or calculation of the equation by which IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF is to be converted into cash, surrendered or redeemed, as the case may be. S&P Dow Jones Indices has no obligation or liability in connection with the administration, marketing or trading of IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF. There is no assurance that investment products based on the S&P U.S. High Yield Low Volatility Corporate Bond Index will accurately track index performance or provide positive investment returns. S&P Dow Jones Indices LLC is not an investment advisor. Inclusion of a security within an index is not a recommendation by S&P Dow Jones Indices to buy, sell, or hold such security, nor is it considered to be investment advice.
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S&P DOW JONES INDICES DOES NOT GUARANTEE THE ADEQUACY, ACCURACY, TIMELINESS AND/OR THE COMPLETENESS OF THE S&P U.S. HIGH YIELD LOW VOLATILITY CORPORATE BOND INDEX OR ANY DATA RELATED THERETO OR ANY COMMUNICATION, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, ORAL OR WRITTEN COMMUNICATION (INCLUDING ELECTRONIC COMMUNICATIONS) WITH RESPECT THERETO. S&P DOW JONES INDICES SHALL NOT BE SUBJECT TO ANY DAMAGES OR LIABILITY FOR ANY ERRORS, OMISSIONS, OR DELAYS THEREIN. S&P DOW JONES INDICES MAKES NO EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, AND EXPRESSLY DISCLAIMS ALL WARRANTIES, OF MERCHANTABILITY OR FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE OR USE OR AS TO RESULTS TO BE OBTAINED BY INDEXIQ ADVISORS LLC, OWNERS OF THE IQ S&P HIGH YIELD LOW VOLATILITY BOND ETF, OR ANY OTHER PERSON OR ENTITY FROM THE USE OF THE S&P U.S. HIGH YIELD LOW VOLATILITY CORPORATE BOND INDEX OR WITH RESPECT TO ANY DATA RELATED THERETO. WITHOUT LIMITING ANY OF THE FOREGOING, IN NO EVENT WHATSOEVER SHALL S&P DOW JONES INDICES BE LIABLE FOR ANY INDIRECT, SPECIAL, INCIDENTAL, PUNITIVE, OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, LOSS OF PROFITS, TRADING LOSSES, LOST TIME OR GOODWILL, EVEN IF THEY HAVE BEEN ADVISED OF THE POSSIBILITY OF SUCH DAMAGES, WHETHER IN CONTRACT, TORT, STRICT LIABILITY, OR OTHERWISE. THERE ARE NO THIRD PARTY BENEFICIARIES OF ANY AGREEMENTS OR ARRANGEMENTS BETWEEN S&P DOW JONES INDICES AND INDEXIQ ADVISORS LLC, OTHER THAN THE LICENSORS OF S&P DOW JONES INDICES.
Fund Administrator, Custodian, Transfer Agent and Securities Lending Agent
The Bank of New York Mellon (“BNY Mellon”), located at 240 Greenwich Street, New York, New York 10286, serves as the Fund’s Administrator, Custodian, Transfer Agent and Securities Lending Agent. BNY Mellon is the principal operating subsidiary of The Bank of New York Mellon Corporation.
Under the Fund Administration and Accounting Agreement (the “Administration Agreement”), BNY Mellon serves as Administrator for the Fund. Under the Administration Agreement, BNY Mellon provides necessary administrative, legal, tax, accounting services, and financial reporting for the maintenance and operations of the Trust. In addition, BNY Mellon makes available the office space, equipment, personnel and facilities required to provide such services.
BNY Mellon supervises the overall administration of the Trust, including, among other responsibilities, assisting in the preparation and filing of documents required for compliance by the Fund with applicable laws and regulations and arranging for the maintenance of books and records of the Fund. BNY Mellon provides persons satisfactory to the Board to serve as officers of the Trust.
Distributor
ALPS Distributors, Inc. (“ALPS” or the “Distributor”), located at 1290 Broadway, Suite 1100, Denver, Colorado 80203 serves as the Distributor of Creation Units for the Fund on an agency basis. The Distributor does not maintain a Secondary Market in the Fund’s Shares. NYLIFE Distributors LLC has entered into a Services Agreement with ALPS to market the Fund.
Independent Registered Public Accounting Firm
PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, located at 300 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10017, serves as the independent registered public accounting firm for the Trust.
Legal Counsel
Chapman and Cutler LLP, located at 1717 Rhode Island Avenue, Washington, D.C. 20036, serves as counsel to the Trust and the Fund.
Frequent Trading
The Board has not adopted policies and procedures with respect to frequent purchases and redemptions of Shares by Fund shareholders (“market timing”). In determining not to adopt market timing policies and procedures, the Board noted that the Fund is expected to be attractive to active institutional and retail investors interested in buying and selling Shares on a short-term basis. In addition, the Board considered that, unlike traditional mutual funds, the Shares can only be purchased and redeemed directly from the Fund in Creation Units by Authorized Participants, and that the vast majority of trading in the Shares occurs on the Secondary Market. Because Secondary Market trades do not involve the Fund directly, it is unlikely those trades would cause many of the harmful effects of market timing, including dilution, disruption of portfolio management, increases in the Fund’s trading costs and the realization of capital gains. With respect to trades directly with the Fund, to the extent effected in-kind (namely, for securities), those trades do not cause any of the harmful effects that may result from frequent cash trades. To the extent trades are effected in whole or in
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part in cash, the Board noted that those trades could result in dilution to the Fund and increased transaction cost (the Fund may impose higher transaction fees to offset these increased costs), which could negatively impact the Fund’s ability to achieve its investment objective. However, the Board also noted that direct trading on a short-term basis by Authorized Participants is critical to ensuring that the Shares trade at or close to NAV.
Given this structure, the Board determined that it is not necessary to adopt market timing policies and procedures. The Fund reserves the right to reject any purchase order at any time and reserves the right to impose restrictions on disruptive or excessive trading in Creation Units.
The Board has instructed the officers of the Trust to review reports of purchases and redemptions of Creation Units on a regular basis to determine if there is any unusual trading in the Fund. The officers of the Trust will report to the Board any such unusual trading in Creation Units that is disruptive to the Fund. In such event, the Board may reconsider its decision not to adopt market timing policies and procedures.
Distribution and Service Plan
The Board has adopted a Distribution and Service Plan pursuant to Rule 12b-1 under the 1940 Act. In accordance with its Rule 12b-1 plan, the Fund is authorized to pay an amount up to 0.10% of its average daily net assets each year to finance activities primarily intended to result in the sale of Creation Units of the Fund or the provision of investor services. No Rule 12b-1 fees are currently paid by the Fund and there are no plans to impose these fees. However, in the event Rule 12b-1 fees are charged in the future, they will be paid out of the Fund’s assets, and over time these fees will increase the cost of your investment and they may cost you more than certain other types of sales charges.
The Advisor and its affiliates may, out of their own resources, pay amounts (“Payments”) to third-parties for distribution or marketing services on behalf of the Funds. The making of these payments could create a conflict of interest for a financial intermediary receiving such payments. The Advisor may make Payments for such third-parties to organize or participate in activities that are designed to make registered representatives, other professionals and individual investors more knowledgeable about ETFs, including ETFs advised by the Advisor, or for other activities, such as participation in marketing activities and presentations, educational training programs, conferences, the development of technology platforms and reporting systems. The Advisor also may make Payments to third-parties to help defray costs typically covered by a trading commission, such as certain printing, publishing and mailing costs or materials relating to the marketing of services related to exchange-traded products (such as commission-free trading platforms) or exchange-traded products in general.
Determination of Net Asset Value (NAV)
The NAV of the Shares for the Fund is equal to the Fund’s total assets minus its total liabilities divided by the total number of Shares outstanding. Interest and investment income on the Fund’s assets accrue daily and are included in the Fund’s total assets. Expenses and fees (including investment advisory, management, administration and distribution fees, if any) accrue daily and are included in the Fund’s total liabilities. The NAV that is published is rounded to the nearest cent; however, for purposes of determining the price of Creation Units, the NAV is calculated to eight decimal places. The NAV is calculated by the Administrator and Custodian and determined each day the NYSE Arca is open for trading as of the close of regular trading on the NYSE Arca (ordinarily 4:00 p.m. Eastern time).
The Fund typically values fixed-income portfolio securities using last available bid prices or current market quotations provided by dealers or prices (including evaluated prices) supplied by the Fund’s approved independent third-party pricing services. Pricing services may use matrix pricing or valuation models that utilize certain inputs and assumptions to derive values. Pricing services generally value fixed-income securities assuming orderly transactions of an institutional round lot size, but the Fund may hold or transact in such securities in smaller odd lot sizes. Odd lots often trade at different prices that may be above or below the price at which the pricing service has valued the security. An amortized cost method of valuation may be used with respect to debt obligations with sixty days or less remaining to maturity unless the Advisor determines in good faith that such method does not represent fair value.
The Fund invests in non-U.S. securities. Non-U.S. securities held by the Fund may trade on weekends or other days when the Fund does not price its shares. As a result, the Fund’s NAV may change on days when Authorized Participants will not be able to purchase or redeem Shares.
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Generally, trading in non-U.S. securities, U.S. government securities, money market instruments and certain fixed-income securities is substantially completed each day at various times prior to the close of business on the NYSE. The values of such securities used in computing the NAV of the Fund are determined as of such times.
When market quotations or prices are not readily available or are deemed unreliable or not representative of an investment’s fair value, investments are valued using fair value pricing as determined in good faith by the Advisor under procedures established by and under the general supervision and responsibility of the Trust’s Board. The Advisor may conclude that a market quotation is not readily available or is unreliable if a security or other asset or liability does not have a price source due to its lack of liquidity or other reason, if a market quotation differs significantly from recent price quotations or otherwise no longer appears to reflect fair value, where the security or other asset or liability is thinly traded, or if the trading market on which a security is listed is suspended or closed and no appropriate alternative trading market is available.
The frequency with which the Fund’s investments are valued using fair value pricing is primarily a function of the types of securities and other assets in which the Fund invests pursuant to its investment objective, strategies and limitations. If the Fund invests in other open-end management investment companies registered under the 1940 Act, they may rely on the NAVs of those companies to value the shares they hold of them. Those companies may also use fair value pricing under some circumstances.
Valuing the Fund’s investments using fair value pricing results in using prices for those investments that may differ from current market valuations. Accordingly, fair value pricing could result in a difference between the prices used to calculate NAV and the prices used to determine the Fund’s Indicative Intra-Day Value (“IIV”), which could result in the market prices for Shares deviating from NAV.
Indicative Intra-Day Value
The approximate value of the Fund’s investments on a per-Share basis, the Indicative Intra-Day Value, or IIV, is disseminated by the NYSE Arca every 15 seconds during hours of trading on the NYSE Arca. The IIV should not be viewed as a “real-time” update of NAV because the IIV may not be calculated in the same manner as NAV, which is computed once per day.
Solactive AG, an independent third party calculator calculates the IIV for the Fund during hours of trading on the NYSE Arca by dividing the “Estimated Fund Value” as of the time of the calculation by the total number of outstanding Shares of that Fund. “Estimated Fund Value” is the sum of the estimated amount of cash held in the Fund’s portfolio, the estimated amount of accrued interest owed to the Fund and the estimated value of the securities held in the Fund’s portfolio, minus the estimated amount of the Fund’s liabilities. The IIV will be calculated based on the same portfolio holdings disclosed on the Trust’s website.
The Fund provides the independent third party calculator with information to calculate the IIV, but the Fund is not involved in the actual calculation of the IIV and is not responsible for the calculation or dissemination of the IIV. The Fund makes no warranty as to the accuracy of the IIV.
Premium/Discount Information
Information regarding the extent and frequency with which market prices of Shares has tracked the Fund’s NAV for the most recently completed calendar year and the quarters since that year will be available without charge on the Fund’s website at newyorklifeinvestments.com.
Dividends, Distributions and Taxes
Net Investment Income and Capital Gains
As a Fund shareholder, you are entitled to your share of the Fund’s distributions of net investment income and net realized capital gains on its investments. The Fund pays out substantially all of its net earnings to their shareholders as “distributions.”
The Fund typically earns interest from debt securities. These amounts, net of expenses, typically are passed along to Fund shareholders as dividends from net investment income. The Fund realizes capital gains or losses whenever they sell securities. Net capital gains typically are passed along to shareholders as “capital gain distributions.” Net investment income and net capital gains typically are distributed to shareholders at least annually. Dividends may be declared and paid more frequently to improve index tracking or to comply with the distribution requirements of the U.S. Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended (the “Code”). In addition,
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the Fund may decide to distribute at least annually amounts representing the full dividend yield net of expenses on the underlying investment securities, as if the Fund owned the underlying investment securities for the entire dividend period, in which case some portion of each distribution may result in a return of capital. You will be notified regarding the portion of a distribution that represents a return of capital.
Distributions in cash may be reinvested automatically in additional Shares of the Fund only if the broker through which you purchased Shares makes such option available. Distributions which are reinvested nevertheless will be subject to U.S. federal income tax to the same extent as if such distributions had not been reinvested.
U.S. Federal Income Taxation
The following is a summary of certain U.S. federal income tax considerations applicable to an investment in Shares of the Fund. The summary is based on the Code, U.S. Treasury Department regulations promulgated thereunder, and judicial and administrative interpretations thereof, all as in effect on the date of this Prospectus and all of which are subject to change, possibly with retroactive effect. In addition, this summary assumes that a Fund shareholder holds Shares as capital assets within the meaning of the Code and does not hold Shares in connection with a trade or business. This summary does not address all potential U.S. federal income tax considerations possibly applicable to an investment in Shares of the Fund, and does not address the consequences to Fund shareholders subject to special tax rules, including, but not limited to, partnerships and the partners therein, tax-exempt shareholders, regulated investment companies (“RICs”), real estate trusts (“REITs”, real estate mortgage investment conduits (“REMICs”), those who hold Shares through an IRA, 401(k) plan or other tax-advantaged account, and, except to the extent discussed below, “non-U.S. shareholders” ​(as defined below). This discussion does not discuss any aspect of U.S. state, local, estate, and gift, or non-U.S. tax law. Furthermore, this discussion is not intended or written to be legal or tax advice to any shareholder in the Fund or other person and is not intended or written to be used or relied on, and cannot be used or relied on, by any such person for the purpose of avoiding any U.S. federal tax penalties that may be imposed on such person.
Prospective Fund shareholders are urged to consult their own tax advisors with respect to the specific U.S. federal, state and local, and non-U.S., tax consequences of investing in Shares, based on their particular circumstances.
The Fund has not requested and will not request an advance ruling from the U.S. Internal Revenue Service (the “IRS”) as to the U.S. federal income tax matters described below. The IRS could adopt positions contrary to those discussed below and such positions could be sustained. Prospective investors should consult their own tax advisors with regard to the U.S. federal tax consequences of the purchase, ownership and disposition of Shares, as well as the tax consequences arising under the laws of any state, locality, non-U.S. country or other taxing jurisdiction. The following information supplements, and should be read in conjunction with, the section in the SAI entitled “U.S. Federal Income Taxation.”
Tax Treatment of the Fund
The Fund intends to continue to qualify and elect to be treated as a RIC under the Code. To qualify and remain eligible for the special tax treatment accorded to RICs, the Fund must meet certain annual income and quarterly asset diversification requirements and must distribute annually at least 90% of the sum of  (i) its “investment company taxable income” ​(which includes dividends, interest and net short-term capital gains) and (ii) certain net tax-exempt income, if any.
As a RIC, the Fund generally will not be required to pay corporate-level U.S. federal income taxes on any ordinary income or capital gains that it distributes to its shareholders. If the Fund fails to qualify as a RIC for any year (subject to certain curative measures allowed by the Code), the Fund will be subject to regular corporate-level U.S. federal income tax in that year on all of its taxable income, regardless of whether the Fund makes any distributions to its shareholders. In addition, in such case, distributions will be taxable to the Fund’s shareholders generally as ordinary dividends to the extent of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits. The remainder of this discussion assumes that the Fund will qualify for the special tax treatment accorded to RICs.
The Fund generally will be subject to a 4% excise tax on certain undistributed income if the Fund does not distribute to its shareholders in each calendar year an amount at least equal to the sum of 98% of its ordinary income for the calendar year (taking into account certain deferrals and elections), 98.2% of its capital gain net income (adjusted for certain ordinary losses) for the twelve months ended October 31 of such year (or later if the Fund is permitted to elect and so elects), plus 100% of any undistributed amounts from prior years. For these
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purposes, the Fund will be treated as having distributed any amount on which it has been subject to U.S. corporate income tax for the taxable year ending within the calendar year. The Fund intends to make distributions necessary to avoid this 4% excise tax, although there can be no assurance that it will be able to do so.
The Fund may be required to recognize taxable income in advance of receiving the related cash payment. For example, if the Fund invests in original issue discount obligations (such as zero coupon debt instruments or debt instruments with payment-in-kind interest), the Fund will be required to include in income each year a portion of the original issue discount that accrues over the term of the obligation, even if the related cash payment is not received by the Fund until a later year. Under the “wash sale” rules, the Fund may not be able to deduct currently a loss on a disposition of a portfolio security. As a result, the Fund may be required to make an annual income distribution greater than the total cash actually received during the year. Such distribution may be made from the existing cash assets of the Fund or cash generated from selling portfolio securities. The Fund may realize gains or losses from such sales, in which event its shareholders may receive a larger capital gain distribution than they would in the absence of such transactions.
Tax Treatment of Fund Shareholders
Taxation of U.S. Shareholders
The following is a summary of certain U.S. federal income tax consequences of the purchase, ownership and disposition of Shares applicable to “U.S. shareholders.” For purposes of this discussion, a “U.S. shareholder” is a beneficial owner of Shares who, for U.S. federal income tax purposes, is (i) an individual who is a citizen or resident of the United States; (ii) a corporation (or an entity treated as a corporation for U.S. federal income tax purposes) created or organized in the United States or under the laws of the United States, or of any state thereof, or the District of Columbia; (iii) an estate, the income of which is includable in gross income for U.S. federal income tax purposes regardless of its source; or (iv) a trust, if  (1) a U.S. court is able to exercise primary supervision over the administration of such trust and one or more U.S. persons have the authority to control all substantial decisions of the trust, or (2) the trust has a valid election in place to be treated as a U.S. person.
Fund Distributions. In general, Fund distributions are subject to U.S. federal income tax when paid, regardless of whether they consist of cash or property, and regardless of whether they are re-invested in Shares. However, any Fund distribution declared in October, November or December of any calendar year and payable to shareholders of record on a specified date during such month will be deemed to have been received by each Fund shareholder on December 31 of such calendar year, provided such dividend is actually paid during January of the following calendar year.
Distributions of the Fund’s net investment income and net short-term capital gains in excess of net long-term capital losses (collectively referred to as “ordinary income dividends”) are taxable as ordinary income to the extent of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits (subject to an exception for distributions of “qualified dividend income,” as discussed below). To the extent designated as capital gain dividends by the Fund, distributions of the Fund’s net long-term capital gains in excess of net short-term capital losses (“net capital gain”) are taxable at long-term capital gain tax rates to the extent of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits, regardless of a Fund shareholder’s holding period in the Shares. Distributions of  “qualified dividend income” ​(defined below) are, to the extent of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits, taxed to certain non-corporate Fund shareholders at the rates generally applicable to long-term capital gain, provided that the Fund shareholder meets certain holding period and other requirements with respect to the Shares and the Fund meets certain holding period and other requirements with respect to its dividend-paying stocks. For this purpose, “qualified dividend income” generally means income from dividends received by the Fund from U.S. corporations and qualified non-U.S. corporations. Substitute payments received on Shares that are lent out will be ineligible for being reported as qualified dividend income. Given its investment strategy, the Fund does not anticipate that a significant portion of its distributions will be eligible for qualifying dividend treatment. If the Fund pays a dividend that would be “qualified” dividend income for individuals, corporate shareholder may be entitled to a dividend received deduction.
The Fund intends to distribute its net capital gain at least annually. However, by providing written notice to its shareholders no later than 60 days after its year-end, the Fund may elect to retain some or all of its net capital gain and designate the retained amount as a “deemed distribution.” In that event, the Fund pays U.S. federal income tax on the retained net capital gain, and each Fund shareholder recognizes a proportionate share of the Fund’s undistributed net capital gain. In addition, each Fund shareholder can claim a tax credit or refund
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for the shareholder’s proportionate share of the Fund’s U.S. federal income taxes paid on the undistributed net capital gain and increase the shareholder’s tax basis in the Shares by an amount equal to the shareholder’s proportionate share of the Fund’s undistributed net capital gain, reduced by the amount of the shareholder’s tax credit or refund.
Distributions in excess of the Fund’s current and accumulated earnings and profits will, as to each shareholder, be treated as a tax-free return of capital to the extent of the shareholder’s tax basis in its Shares of the Fund, and generally as capital gain thereafter. Any such distribution will reduce the shareholder’s tax basis in the Shares, and thus will increase the shareholder’s capital gain, or decrease the capital loss, recognized upon a sale or exchange of Shares.
In addition, individuals with adjusted gross incomes above certain threshold amounts (and certain trusts and estates) generally are subject to a 3.8% Medicare tax on “net investment income” in addition to otherwise applicable U.S. federal income tax. “Net investment income” generally will include dividends (including capital gain dividends) received from the Fund and net gains from the redemption or other disposition of Shares. Please consult your tax advisor regarding this tax.
Investors considering buying Shares just prior to a distribution should be aware that, although the price of the Shares purchased at such time may reflect the forthcoming distribution, such distribution nevertheless may be taxable (as opposed to a non-taxable return of capital).
Sales or Exchanges of Shares. Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale or exchange of Shares generally is treated as a long-term gain or loss if the Shares have been held for more than one year. Any capital gain or loss realized upon a sale or exchange of Shares held for one year or less generally is treated as a short-term gain or loss, except that any capital loss on the sale or exchange of Shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent that capital gain dividends were paid (or deemed to be paid) with respect to the Shares.
Creation Unit Issues and Redemptions. On an issue of Shares of the Fund as part of a Creation Unit where the creation is conducted in-kind, an Authorized Participant generally recognizes capital gain or loss equal to the difference between (i) the fair market value (at issue) of the issued Shares (plus any cash received by the Authorized Participant as part of the issue) and (ii) the Authorized Participant’s aggregate basis in the exchanged securities (plus any cash paid by the Authorized Participant as part of the issue). On a redemption of Shares as part of a Creation Unit where the redemption is conducted in-kind, an Authorized Participant generally recognizes capital gain or loss equal to the difference between (i) the fair market value (at redemption) of the securities received (plus any cash received by the Authorized Participant as part of the redemption) and (ii) the Authorized Participant’s basis in the redeemed Shares (plus any cash paid by the Authorized Participant as part of the redemption). However, the IRS may assert, under the “wash sale” rules or on the basis that there has been no significant change in the Authorized Participant’s economic position, that any loss on creation or redemption of Creation Units cannot be deducted currently.
In general, any capital gain or loss recognized upon the issue or redemption of Shares (as components of a Creation Unit) is treated either as long-term capital gain or loss, if the deposited securities (in the case of an issue) or the Shares (in the case of a redemption) have been held for more than one year, or otherwise as short-term capital gain or loss. However, any capital loss on a redemption of Shares held for six months or less is treated as long-term capital loss to the extent that capital gain dividends were paid (or deemed to be paid) with respect to such Shares.
Back-Up Withholding
The Fund (or a financial intermediary such as a broker through which a shareholder holds Shares in the Fund) may be required to report certain information on a Fund shareholder to the IRS and withhold U.S. federal income tax (“backup withholding”) at a current rate of 24% from taxable distributions and redemption or sale proceeds payable to the Fund shareholder if  (i) the Fund shareholder fails to provide the Fund with a correct taxpayer identification number or make required certifications, or if the IRS notifies the Fund that the Fund shareholder is otherwise subject to backup withholding, and (ii) the Fund shareholder is not otherwise exempt from backup withholding. Non-U.S. shareholders can qualify for exemption from backup withholding by submitting a properly completed IRS Form W-8BEN or W-8BEN-E. Backup withholding is not an additional tax and any amount withheld may be credited against a Fund shareholder’s U.S. federal income tax liability.
Taxation of Non-U.S. Shareholders
The following is a summary of certain U.S. federal income tax consequences of the purchase, ownership and disposition of Shares applicable to “non-U.S. shareholders.” For purposes of this discussion, a “non-U.S. shareholder” is a beneficial owner of Shares that is not a U.S. shareholder (as defined above) and is not an
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entity or arrangement treated as a partnership for U.S. federal income tax purposes. The following discussion is based on current law and is for general information only. It addresses only selected, and not all, aspects of U.S. federal income taxation applicable to non-U.S. shareholders.
With respect to non-U.S. shareholders of the Fund, the Fund’s ordinary income dividends generally will be subject to U.S. federal withholding tax at a rate of 30% (or at a lower rate established under an applicable tax treaty), subject to certain exceptions for “interest-related dividends” and “short-term capital gain dividends” discussed below. The Fund will not pay any additional amounts to shareholders in respect of any amounts withheld. U.S. federal withholding tax generally will not apply to any gain realized by a non-U.S. shareholder in respect of the Fund’s net capital gain. Special rules (not discussed herein) apply with respect to dividends of the Fund that are attributable to gain from the sale or exchange of  “U.S. real property interests.”
In general, all “interest-related dividends” and “short-term capital gain dividends” ​(each defined below) will not be subject to U.S. federal withholding tax, provided that, among other requirements, the non-U.S. shareholder furnished the Fund with a completed IRS Form W-8BEN or W-8BEN-E, as applicable, (or acceptable substitute documentation) establishing the non-U.S. shareholder’s non-U.S. status and the Fund does not have actual knowledge or reason to know that the non-U.S. shareholder would be subject to such withholding tax if the non-U.S. shareholder were to receive the related amounts directly rather than as dividends from the Fund. “Interest-related dividends” generally means dividends designated by the Fund as attributable to the Fund’s U.S.-source interest income, other than certain contingent interest and interest from obligations of a corporation or partnership in which such Fund is at least a 10% shareholder, reduced by expenses that are allocable to such income. “Short-term capital gain dividends” generally means dividends designated by the Fund as attributable to the excess of the Fund’s net short-term capital gain over its net long-term capital loss. Depending on its circumstances, the Fund may treat such dividends, in whole or in part, as ineligible for these exemptions from withholding.
In general, subject to certain exceptions, non-U.S. shareholders will not be subject to U.S. federal income or withholding tax in respect of a sale or other disposition of Shares of the Fund.
To claim a credit or refund for any Fund-level taxes on any undistributed net capital gain (as discussed above) or any taxes collected through back-up withholding (discussed below), a non-U.S. shareholder must obtain a U.S. taxpayer identification number and file a U.S. federal income tax return even if the non-U.S. shareholder would not otherwise be required to do so.
Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act
The U.S. Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (“FATCA”) generally imposes a 30% withholding tax on “withholdable payments” ​(defined below) made to (i) a “foreign financial institution” ​(“FFI”), unless the FFI enters into an agreement with the IRS to provide information regarding certain of its direct and indirect U.S. account holders and satisfy certain due diligence and other specified requirements, and (ii) a “non-financial foreign entity” ​(“NFFE”) unless such NFFE provides certain information about its direct and indirect “substantial U.S. owners” to the withholding agent or certifies that it has no such U.S. owners. The beneficial owner of a “withholdable payment” may be eligible for a refund or credit of the withheld tax. The U.S. government also has entered into intergovernmental agreements with other jurisdictions to provide an alternative, and generally easier, approach for FFIs to comply with FATCA. If the shareholder is a tax resident in a jurisdiction that has entered into an intergovernmental agreement with the U.S. government, the shareholder will be required to provide information about the shareholder’s classification and compliance with the intergovernmental agreement.
“Withholdable payments” generally include, among other items, U.S.-source interest and dividends, and gross proceeds from the sale or disposition of property of a type that can produce U.S.-source interest or dividends. However, proposed regulations may eliminate the requirement to withhold on payments of gross proceeds from dispositions.
The Fund or a shareholder’s broker may be required to impose a 30% withholding tax on withholdable payments to a shareholder if the shareholder fails to provide the Fund with the information, certifications or documentation required under FATCA, including information, certification or documentation necessary for the Fund to determine if the shareholder is a non-U.S. shareholder or a U.S. shareholder and, if it is a non-U.S. shareholder, if the non-U.S. shareholder has “substantial U.S. owners” and/or is in compliance with (or meets an exception from) FATCA requirements. The Fund will not pay any additional amounts to shareholders in respect of any amounts withheld. The Fund may disclose any shareholder information, certifications or documentation to the IRS or other parties as necessary to comply with FATCA.
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The requirements of, and exceptions from, FATCA are complex. All prospective shareholders are urged to consult their own tax advisors regarding the potential application of FATCA with respect to their own situation.
For a more detailed tax discussion regarding an investment in the Fund, please see the section of the SAI entitled “U.S. Federal Income Taxation.”
Code of Ethics
The Trust, Advisor, Subadvisor and Distributor each have adopted a code of ethics under Rule 17j-1 of the 1940 Act that is designed to prevent affiliated persons of the Trust, the Advisor, the Subadvisor, and the Distributor from engaging in deceptive, manipulative or fraudulent activities in connection with securities held or to be acquired by the Fund (which may also be held by persons subject to a code). There can be no assurance that the codes will be effective in preventing such activities. The codes permit personnel subject to them to invest in securities, including securities that may be held or purchased by the Fund. The codes are on file with the SEC and are available to the public.
Fund Website and Disclosure of Portfolio Holdings
The Advisor maintains a website for the Fund at newyorklifeinvestments.com. The website for the Fund contains the following information, on a per-Share basis, for the Fund: (1) the prior Business Day’s NAV; (2) the reported mid-point of the bid-ask spread at the time of NAV calculation (the “Bid-Ask Price”); (3) a calculation of the premium or discount of the Bid-Ask Price against such NAV; and (4) data in chart format displaying the frequency distribution of discounts and premiums of the Bid-Ask Price against the NAV, within appropriate ranges, for each of the four previous calendar quarters (or for the life of the Fund, if shorter). In addition, on each Business Day, before the commencement of trading in Shares on the NYSE Arca, the Fund will disclose on its website (newyorklifeinvestments.com) the identities and quantities of the portfolio securities and other assets held by the Fund that will form the basis for the calculation of NAV at the end of the Business Day.
A description of the Fund’s policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Fund’s portfolio securities is available in the SAI.
Other Information
The Fund is not sponsored, endorsed, sold or promoted by the NYSE Arca. The NYSE Arca makes no representation or warranty, express or implied, to the owners of Shares or any member of the public regarding the advisability of investing in securities generally or in the Fund particularly or the ability of the Fund to achieve its objectives. The NYSE Arca has no obligation or liability in connection with the administration, marketing or trading of the Fund.
For purposes of the 1940 Act, the Fund is a registered investment company, and the acquisition of Shares by other registered investment companies and companies relying on exemption from registration as investment companies under Section 3(c)(1) or 3(c)(7) of the 1940 Act is subject to the restrictions of Section 12(d)(1) of the 1940 Act, except as permitted by an exemptive order that permits registered investment companies to invest in the Fund beyond those limitations.
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Financial Highlights
Selected Data for a Share of Capital Stock Outstanding
The financial highlights table is intended to help you understand the Fund’s financial performance for the period of the Fund’s operations. Certain information reflects financial results for a single Fund Share. The total returns in the table represents the rate that an investor would have earned (or lost) on an investment in the Fund (assuming reinvestment of all dividends and distributions). This information has been audited by PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, whose report, along with the Fund’s financial statements, is included in the Fund’s Annual Report, which is available upon request.
IQ S&P High Yield Low Volatility Bond ETF
For the Year Ended April 30,
For the Period
February 15,
2017(a) to
April 30, 2017
2021
2020
2019
2018
Net asset value, beginning of period
$ 23.86 $ 24.76 $ 24.36 $ 25.20 $ 25.00
Income from Investment Operations
Net investment income(b)(c)
0.93 1.01 1.07 0.99 0.20
Net realized and unrealized gain (loss)
1.16 (0.81) 0.41 (0.88) 0.10
Net increase (decrease) in net assets resulting from
investment operations
2.09 0.20 1.48 0.11 0.30
Distributions from:
Net investment income
(0.96) (1.10) (1.08) (0.95) (0.10)
Net asset value, end of period
$ 24.99 $ 23.86 $ 24.76 $ 24.36 $ 25.20
Market price, end of period
$ 25.02 $ 24.03 $ 24.78 $ 24.32 $ 25.34
Total Return
Total investment return based on net asset
value(d)
8.89% 0.71% 6.31% 0.39% 1.40%
Total investment return based on market price(e)
8.23% 1.34% 6.56% (0.36)% 1.93%(f)
Ratios/Supplemental Data
Net assets, end of period (000’s omitted)
$ 106,222 $ 51,295 $ 65,626 $ 107,192 $ 49,145
Ratio to average net assets of:
Expenses net of waivers/reimbursements(g)
0.40% 0.40% 0.40% 0.40% 0.40%(h)
Expenses excluding waivers/reimbursements(g)
0.41% 0.41% 0.41% 0.41% 0.41%(h)
Net investment income (loss)(c)
3.72% 4.04% 4.42% 3.97% 4.05%(h)
Portfolio turnover rate(i)
105% 105% 83% 75% 15%
(a)
Commencement of operations.
(b)
Based on average shares outstanding.
(c)
Recognition of net investment income by the Fund is affected by the timing of the declaration of dividends by the investment companies in which the Fund invests.
(d)
Total investment return is calculated assuming an initial investment made at the net asset value at the beginning of the period, reinvestment of all dividends and distributions, if any, at net asset value during the period, and redemption on the last day of the period. Total return calculated for a period less than one year is not annualized.
(e)
The market price returns are calculated using the mean between the last bid and ask prices.
(f)
Since the Shares of the Fund did not trade in the secondary market until the day after the Fund’s inception, for the period from the inception to the first day of the secondary market trading, the NAV is used as a proxy for the secondary market trading price to calculate the market returns.
(g)
In addition to the fees and expenses which the Fund bears directly, the Fund indirectly bears a prorated share of the fees and expenses of the underlying funds in which it invests. Such indirect expenses are not included in the above expense ratios.
(h)
Annualized.
(i)
Portfolio turnover rate is not annualized and excludes the value of portfolio securities received or delivered as in-kind creations or redemptions in connection with the Fund’s capital share transactions.
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Privacy Policy
The following notice does not constitute part of the Prospectus, nor is it incorporated into the Prospectus.
The Trust is committed to respecting the privacy of personal information you entrust to us in the course of doing business with us.
The Trust may collect non-public personal information from various sources. The Trust uses such information provided by you or your representative to process transactions, to respond to inquiries from you, to deliver reports, products, and services, and to fulfill legal and regulatory requirements.
We do not disclose any non-public personal information about our customers to anyone unless permitted by law or approved by the customer. We may share this information within the Trust’s family of companies in the course of providing services and products to best meet your investing needs. We may share information with certain third-parties who are not affiliated with the Trust to perform marketing services, to process or service a transaction at your request or as permitted by law. For example, sharing information with companies that maintain or service customer accounts for the Trust is essential. We may also share information with companies that perform administrative or marketing services for the Trust, including research firms. When we enter into such a relationship, we restrict the companies’ use of our customers’ information and prohibit them from sharing it or using it for any purposes other than those for which they were hired.
We maintain physical, electronic, and procedural safeguards to protect your personal information. Within the Trust, we restrict access to personal information to those employees who require access to that information in order to provide products or services to our customers, such as handling inquiries. Our employment policies restrict the use of customer information and require that it be held in strict confidence.
We will adhere to the policies and practices described in this notice for both current and former customers of the Trust.
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Frequently Used Terms
Trust IndexIQ ETF Trust, a registered open-end investment company
Fund The investment portfolios of the Trust
Shares Shares of the Fund offered to investors
Advisor IndexIQ Advisors LLC
Subadvisor MacKay Shields LLC
Custodian The Bank of New York Mellon, the custodian of the Fund’s assets
Distributor ALPS Distributors, Inc., the distributor of the Fund
AP or Authorized
Participant
Certain large institutional investors such as brokers, dealers, banks or other entities that have entered into authorized participant agreements with the Distributor
NYSE Arca
NYSE Arca, Inc., the primary market on which Shares are listed for trading
IIV The Indicative Intra-Day Value, an appropriate per-Share value based on the Fund’s portfolio
1940 Act Investment Company Act of 1940
NAV Net asset value
SAI Statement of Additional Information
SEC Securities and Exchange Commission
Secondary Market A national securities exchange, national securities association or over-the counter trading system where Shares may trade from time to time
Securities Act Securities Act of 1933
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IndexIQ ETF Trust
Mailing Address
51 Madison Avenue
New York, New York 10010
1-888-474-7725
newyorklifeinvestments.com
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IndexIQ ETF Trust
PROSPECTUS   |   August 31, 2021
FOR MORE INFORMATION
If you would like more information about the Trust, the Fund and the Shares, the following documents are available free upon request:
Annual/Semi-annual Report
Additional information about the Fund’s investments is available in the Fund’s annual and semi-annual reports to shareholders (once available). In the Fund’s annual report, you will find a discussion of the market conditions and investment strategies that significantly affected the Fund’s performance during the last fiscal year.
Statement of Additional Information
Additional information about the Fund and its policies is also available in the Fund’s SAI. The SAI is incorporated by reference into this Prospectus (and is legally considered part of this Prospectus). The Fund’s annual and semi-annual reports (once available) and the SAI are available free upon request by calling IndexIQ at 1-888-474-7725. You can also access and download the annual and semi-annual reports (once available) and the SAI at the Fund’s website: newyorklifeinvestments.com.
To obtain other information and for shareholder inquiries:
By telephone: 1-888-474-7725
By mail: IndexIQ ETF Trust
c/o IndexIQ
51 Madison Avenue
New York, NY 10010
On the Internet: SEC Edgar database: http://www.sec.gov; or newyorklifeinvestments.com
You may review and obtain copies of Fund documents (including the SAI) by visiting the SEC’s public reference room in Washington, D.C. You may also obtain copies of Fund documents, after paying a duplicating fee, by writing to the SEC’s Public Reference Section, Washington, D.C. 20549-0102 or by electronic request to: publicinfo@sec.gov. Information on the operation of the public reference room may be obtained by calling the SEC at (202) 551-8090.
No person is authorized to give any information or to make any representations about the Fund and its Shares not contained in this Prospectus and you should not rely on any other information. Read and keep the Prospectus for future reference.
Dealers effecting transactions in the Fund’s Shares, whether or not participating in this distribution, may be generally required to deliver a Prospectus. This is in addition to any obligation dealers have to deliver a Prospectus when acting as underwriters.
“New York Life Investments” is both a servicemark, and the common trade name, of certain investment advisors affiliated with New York Life Insurance Company.
IQ® and IndexIQ® are registered servicemarks of New York Life Insurance Company.
The Trust’s investment company registration number is 811-22227.
     ME01hylv-08/21
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