Fund/Class
Class A
Class M
Class C
Class I
Class Z
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%/Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20%
FTAWX
FTDWX
FTCWX
FTIWX
FIKVX
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%/Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30%
FTAAX
FTTNX
FCANX
FTINX
FIKWX
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%/Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40%
FFNAX
FFNTX
FFNCX
FFNIX
FIKYX
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%/Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50%
FFAMX
FFTMX
FFCMX
FFIMX
FIKZX
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%/Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60%
FSAAX
FSATX
FSCNX
FSNIX
FIQAX
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%/Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70%
FAASX
FTASX
FCASX
FAAIX
FIQBX
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%/Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85%
FEYAX
FEYTX
FEYCX
FEYIX
FIQCX
Funds of Fidelity Charles Street Trust
STATEMENT OF ADDITIONAL INFORMATION
November 29, 2022
This Statement of Additional Information (SAI) is not a prospectus. Portions of each fund's annual report are incorporated herein. The annual report(s) are supplied with this SAI.
To obtain a free additional copy of a prospectus or SAI, dated November 29, 2022, or an annual report, please call Fidelity at 1-877-208-0098 or visit Fidelity's web site at institutional.fidelity.com. 
For more information on any Fidelity ® fund, including charges and expenses, call Fidelity at the number indicated above for a free prospectus. Read it carefully before investing or sending money.
245 Summer Street, Boston, MA 02210  
AAR-AARI-PTB-1122
1.834575.118

TABLE OF CONTENTS

INVESTMENT POLICIES AND LIMITATIONS
SPECIAL GEOGRAPHIC CONSIDERATIONS
PORTFOLIO TRANSACTIONS
VALUATION
BUYING, SELLING, AND EXCHANGING INFORMATION
DISTRIBUTIONS AND TAXES
TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS
CONTROL OF INVESTMENT ADVISERS
MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS
PROXY VOTING GUIDELINES
DISTRIBUTION SERVICES
TRANSFER AND SERVICE AGENT AGREEMENTS
SECURITIES LENDING
DESCRIPTION OF THE TRUST
FUND HOLDINGS INFORMATION
FINANCIAL STATEMENTS
APPENDIX
The following policies and limitations supplement those set forth in the prospectus. Unless otherwise noted, whenever an investment policy or limitation states a maximum percentage of a fund's assets that may be invested in any security or other asset, or sets forth a policy regarding quality standards, such standard or percentage limitation will be determined immediately after and as a result of the fund's acquisition of such security or other asset. Accordingly, any subsequent change in values, net assets, or other circumstances will not be considered when determining whether the investment complies with the fund's investment policies and limitations.
A fund's fundamental investment policies and limitations cannot be changed without approval by a "majority of the outstanding voting securities" (as defined in the Investment Company Act of 1940 (1940 Act)) of the fund. However, except for the fundamental investment limitations listed below, the investment policies and limitations described in this Statement of Additional Information (SAI) are not fundamental and may be changed without shareholder approval.
The following are each fund's fundamental investment limitations set forth in their entirety.
Diversification
For each fund:
The fund may not with respect to 75% of the fund's total assets, purchase the securities of any issuer (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities, or securities of other investment companies) if, as a result, (a) more than 5% of the fund's total assets would be invested in the securities of that issuer, or (b) the fund would hold more than 10% of the outstanding voting securities of that issuer.
Senior Securities
For each fund:
The fund may not issue senior securities, except in connection with the insurance program established by the fund pursuant to an exemptive order issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission or as otherwise permitted under the Investment Company Act of 1940.
Borrowing
For each fund:
The fund may not borrow money, except that the fund may borrow money for temporary or emergency purposes (not for leveraging or investment) in an amount not exceeding 33 1/3% of its total assets (including the amount borrowed) less liabilities (other than borrowings). Any borrowings that come to exceed this amount will be reduced within three days (not including Sundays and holidays) to the extent necessary to comply with the 33 1/3% limitation.
Underwriting
For each fund:
The fund may not underwrite securities issued by others, except to the extent that the fund may be considered an underwriter within the meaning of the Securities Act of 1933 in the disposition of restricted securities or in connection with investments in other investment companies.
Concentration
For each fund:
The fund may not purchase the securities of any issuer (other than securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. Government or any of its agencies or instrumentalities) if, as a result, more than 25% of the fund's total assets would be invested in the securities of companies whose principal business activities are in the same industry.
For purposes of each of Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%'s, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%'s concentration limitation discussed above, with respect to any investment in repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. Government securities, Fidelity Management & Research Company LLC (FMR) looks through to the U.S. Government securities.
For purposes of each of Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%'s, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%'s concentration limitation discussed above, with respect to any investment in Fidelity® Money Market Central Fund and/or any non-money market Central fund, FMR looks through to the holdings of the Central fund.
For purposes of each of Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%'s, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%'s, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%'s concentration limitation discussed above, FMR may analyze the characteristics of a particular issuer and security and assign an industry or sector classification consistent with those characteristics in the event that the third-party classification provider used by FMR does not assign a classification.
Real Estate
For each fund:
The fund may not purchase or sell real estate unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments (but this shall not prevent the fund from investing in securities or other instruments backed by real estate or securities of companies engaged in the real estate business).
Commodities
For each fund (other than Fidelity Asset Manager ® 70% and Fidelity Asset Manager ® 85%):
The fund may not purchase or sell physical commodities unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments (but this shall not prevent the fund from purchasing or selling options and futures contracts or from investing in securities or other instruments backed by physical commodities).
For Fidelity Asset Manager ® 70% and Fidelity Asset Manager ® 85%:
The fund may not purchase or sell physical commodities unless acquired as a result of ownership of securities or other instruments (but this shall not prevent the fund from purchasing and selling precious metals, or from purchasing or selling options and futures contracts or from investing in securities or other instruments backed by physical commodities).
Loans
For each fund:
The fund may not lend any security or make any other loan if, as a result, more than 33 1/3% of its total assets would be lent to other parties, but this limitation does not apply to purchases of debt securities or to repurchase agreements, or to acquisitions of loans, loan participations or other forms of debt instruments.
Pooled Funds
For Fidelity Asset Manager ® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 50%, and Fidelity Asset Manager ® 70%:
The fund may, notwithstanding any other fundamental investment policy or limitation, invest all of its assets in the securities of a single open-end management investment company with substantially the same fundamental investment objective, policies, and limitations as the fund.
For Fidelity Asset Manager ® 85%:
The fund may, notwithstanding any other fundamental investment policy or limitation, invest all of its assets in the securities of a single open-end management investment company managed by FMR or an affiliate or successor with substantially the same fundamental investment objective, policies, and limitations as the fund.
The following investment limitations are not fundamental and may be changed without shareholder approval.
Short Sales
For each fund:
The fund does not currently intend to sell securities short, unless it owns or has the right to obtain securities equivalent in kind and amount to the securities sold short, except for sales of to be announced (TBA) securities, and provided that transactions in futures contracts, options, and swaps are not deemed to constitute selling securities short.
Margin Purchases
For each fund:
The fund does not currently intend to purchase securities on margin, except that the fund may obtain such short-term credits as are necessary for the clearance of transactions, and provided that margin payments in connection with futures contracts and options on futures contracts shall not constitute purchasing securities on margin.
Borrowing
For each fund:
The fund may borrow money only (a) from a bank or from a registered investment company or portfolio for which FMR or an affiliate serves as investment adviser or (b) by engaging in reverse repurchase agreements with any party (reverse repurchase agreements are treated as borrowings for purposes of the fundamental borrowing investment limitation).
Illiquid Securities
For each fund:
The fund does not currently intend to purchase any security if, as a result, more than 10% of its net assets would be invested in securities that are deemed to be illiquid because they are subject to legal or contractual restrictions on resale or because they cannot be sold or disposed of in the ordinary course of business at approximately the prices at which they are valued.
For purposes of each fund's illiquid securities limitation discussed above, if through a change in values, net assets, or other circumstances, the fund were in a position where more than 10% of its net assets were invested in illiquid securities, it would consider appropriate steps to protect liquidity.
Commodities
For Fidelity Asset Manager ® 70% and Fidelity Asset Manager ® 85%:
The fund does not currently intend to invest more than 5% of its total assets in precious metals.
Loans
For each fund:
The fund does not currently intend to lend assets other than securities to other parties, except by (a) making direct loans to companies in which the fund has a pre-existing investment (b) lending money (up to 15% of the fund's net assets) to a registered investment company or portfolio for which FMR or an affiliate serves as investment adviser or (c) assuming any unfunded commitments in connection with the acquisition of loans, loan participations, or other forms of debt instruments. (This limitation does not apply to purchases of debt securities, to repurchase agreements, or to acquisitions of loans, loan participations or other forms of debt instruments.)
Pooled Funds
For Fidelity Asset Manager ® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 50%, and Fidelity Asset Manager ® 70%:
The fund does not currently intend to invest all of its assets in the securities of a single open-end management investment company with substantially the same fundamental investment objective, policies, and limitations as the fund.
For Fidelity Asset Manager ® 85%:
The fund does not currently intend to invest all of its assets in the securities of a single open-end management investment company managed by FMR or an affiliate or successor with substantially the same fundamental investment objective, policies, and limitations as the fund.
In addition to each fund's fundamental and non-fundamental investment limitations discussed above:
In order to qualify as a "regulated investment company" under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code of 1986, as amended, each fund currently intends to comply with certain diversification limits imposed by Subchapter M.
The following pages contain more detailed information about types of instruments in which a fund may invest, techniques a fund's adviser (or a sub-adviser) may employ in pursuit of the fund's investment objective, and a summary of related risks. A fund's adviser (or a sub-adviser) may not buy all of these instruments or use all of these techniques unless it believes that doing so will help the fund achieve its goal. However, a fund's adviser (or a sub-adviser) is not required to buy any particular instrument or use any particular technique even if to do so might benefit the fund.
On the following pages in this section titled "Investment Policies and Limitations," and except as otherwise indicated, references to "an adviser" or "the adviser" may relate to a fund's adviser or a sub-adviser, as applicable.
Affiliated Bank Transactions. A Fidelity ® fund may engage in transactions with financial institutions that are, or may be considered to be, "affiliated persons" of the fund under the 1940 Act. These transactions may involve repurchase agreements with custodian banks; short-term obligations of, and repurchase agreements with, the 50 largest U.S. banks (measured by deposits); municipal securities; U.S. Government securities with affiliated financial institutions that are primary dealers in these securities; short-term currency transactions; and short-term borrowings. In accordance with exemptive orders issued by the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), the Board of Trustees has established and periodically reviews procedures applicable to transactions involving affiliated financial institutions.
Asset Allocation. Each of Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85% invests in stocks mainly by investing in Central funds. The stock class for all funds includes domestic and foreign equity securities of all types (other than adjustable rate preferred stocks, which are included in the bond class). Securities in the stock class may include common stocks, fixed-rate preferred stocks (including convertible preferred stocks), warrants, rights, depositary receipts, securities of closed-end investment companies, and other equity securities issued by companies of any size, located throughout the world.
Each of Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85% invests in bonds mainly by investing in Central funds that focus on particular types of fixed-income securities.
The bond class for Fidelity Asset Manager ® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 30%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 40%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 60%, and Fidelity Asset Manager ® 70% includes all varieties of domestic and foreign fixed-income securities maturing in more than one year. Securities in this asset class may include bonds, notes, adjustable-rate preferred stocks, convertible bonds, mortgage-related and asset-backed securities, domestic and foreign government and government agency securities, zero coupon bonds, and other intermediate and long-term securities. These securities may be denominated in U.S. dollars or foreign currency.
The short-term/money market class for Fidelity Asset Manager ® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 30%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 40%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager ® 60%, and Fidelity Asset Manager ® 70% includes Central funds that invest in all types of domestic and foreign short-term and money market instruments. Short-term and money market instruments may include commercial paper, notes, and other corporate debt securities, government securities issued by U.S. or foreign governments or their agencies or instrumentalities, bank deposits and other financial institution obligations, repurchase agreements involving any type of security, and other similar short-term instruments. These instruments may be denominated in U.S. dollars or foreign currency.
The bond and short-term/money market class for Fidelity Asset Manager ® 85% includes all varieties of domestic and foreign fixed-income securities maturing in more than one year and Central funds that invest in all types of domestic and foreign short-term and money market instruments. Securities in this asset class may include bonds, notes, adjustable-rate preferred stocks, convertible bonds, mortgage-related and asset-backed securities, domestic and foreign government and government agency securities, zero coupon bonds, and other intermediate and long-term securities. These securities may be denominated in U.S. dollars or foreign currency. Securities in this asset class may also include short-term and money market instruments such as commercial paper, notes, and other corporate debt securities, government securities issued by U.S. or foreign governments or their agencies or instrumentalities, bank deposits and other financial institution obligations, repurchase agreements involving any type of security, and other similar short-term instruments. These instruments may be denominated in U.S. dollars or foreign currency.
Although the underlying Central funds are categorized generally as stock, bond, and short-term/money market funds, many of the underlying Central funds may invest in a mix of securities of foreign (including emerging markets) and domestic issuers, investment-grade and lower-quality debt securities, and other securities. In making asset allocation decisions, FMR will evaluate projections of risk, market conditions, economic conditions, volatility, yields, and returns. FMR's management will use database systems to help analyze past situations and trends, research specialists in each of the asset classes to help in securities selection, portfolio management professionals to determine asset allocation and to select individual securities, and its own credit analysis as well as credit analyses provided by rating services.
Asset-Backed Securities represent interests in pools of mortgages, loans, receivables, or other assets. Payment of interest and repayment of principal may be largely dependent upon the cash flows generated by the assets backing the securities and, in certain cases, supported by letters of credit, surety bonds, or other credit enhancements. Asset-backed security values may also be affected by other factors including changes in interest rates, the availability of information concerning the pool and its structure, the creditworthiness of the servicing agent for the pool, the originator of the loans or receivables, or the entities providing the credit enhancement. In addition, these securities may be subject to prepayment risk.
Collateralized Loan Obligations (CLO) are a type of asset-backed security. A CLO is a trust typically collateralized by a pool of loans, which may include, among others, domestic and foreign senior secured loans, senior unsecured loans, and subordinate corporate loans, including loans that may be rated below investment grade or equivalent unrated loans. CLOs may charge management fees and administrative expenses. For CLOs, the cash flows from the trust are split into two or more portions, called tranches, varying in risk and yield. The riskiest portion is the "equity" tranche which bears the bulk of defaults from the bonds or loans in the trust and serves to protect the other, more senior tranches from default in all but the most severe circumstances. Since they are partially protected from defaults, senior tranches from a CLO trust typically have higher ratings and lower yields than their underlying securities and can be rated investment grade. Despite the protection from the equity tranche, CLO tranches can experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, increased sensitivity to defaults due to collateral default and disappearance of protecting tranches, market anticipation of defaults, as well as aversion to CLO securities as a class. Normally, CLOs are privately offered and sold, and thus, are not registered under the securities laws. As a result, investments in CLOs may be characterized by a fund as illiquid securities, however an active dealer market may exist allowing them to qualify for Rule 144A transactions.
Borrowing. If a fund borrows money, its share price may be subject to greater fluctuation until the borrowing is paid off. If a fund makes additional investments while borrowings are outstanding, this may be considered a form of leverage.
Cash Management. A fund may hold uninvested cash or may invest it in cash equivalents such as money market securities, repurchase agreements, or shares of short-term bond or money market funds, including (for Fidelity ® funds and other advisory clients only) shares of Fidelity ® Central funds. Generally, these securities offer less potential for gains than other types of securities.
Central Funds are special types of investment vehicles created by Fidelity for use by the Fidelity ® funds and other advisory clients. Central funds are used to invest in particular security types or investment disciplines, or for cash management. Central funds incur certain costs related to their investment activity (such as custodial fees and expenses), but do not pay additional management fees. The investment results of the portions of a Fidelity ® fund's assets invested in the Central funds will be based upon the investment results of those funds.
Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC) Notice of Exclusion. The Adviser, on behalf of the Fidelity® funds to which this SAI relates, has filed with the National Futures Association a notice claiming an exclusion from the definition of the term "commodity pool operator" (CPO) under the Commodity Exchange Act, as amended, and the rules of the CFTC promulgated thereunder, with respect to each fund's operation. Accordingly, neither a fund nor its adviser is subject to registration or regulation as a commodity pool or a CPO. As of the date of this SAI, the adviser does not expect to register as a CPO of the funds. However, there is no certainty that a fund or its adviser will be able to rely on an exclusion in the future as the fund's investments change over time. A fund may determine not to use investment strategies that trigger additional CFTC regulation or may determine to operate subject to CFTC regulation, if applicable. If a fund or its adviser operates subject to CFTC regulation, it may incur additional expenses.
Common Stock represents an equity or ownership interest in an issuer. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds and preferred stock take precedence over the claims of those who own common stock, although related proceedings can take time to resolve and results can be unpredictable. For purposes of a Fidelity ® fund's policies related to investment in common stock Fidelity considers depositary receipts evidencing ownership of common stock to be common stock.
Convertible Securities are bonds, debentures, notes, or other securities that may be converted or exchanged (by the holder or by the issuer) into shares of the underlying common stock (or cash or securities of equivalent value) at a stated exchange ratio. A convertible security may also be called for redemption or conversion by the issuer after a particular date and under certain circumstances (including a specified price) established upon issue. If a convertible security held by a fund is called for redemption or conversion, the fund could be required to tender it for redemption, convert it into the underlying common stock, or sell it to a third party.
Convertible securities generally have less potential for gain or loss than common stocks. Convertible securities generally provide yields higher than the underlying common stocks, but generally lower than comparable non-convertible securities. Because of this higher yield, convertible securities generally sell at prices above their "conversion value," which is the current market value of the stock to be received upon conversion. The difference between this conversion value and the price of convertible securities will vary over time depending on changes in the value of the underlying common stocks and interest rates. When the underlying common stocks decline in value, convertible securities will tend not to decline to the same extent because of the interest or dividend payments and the repayment of principal at maturity for certain types of convertible securities. However, securities that are convertible other than at the option of the holder generally do not limit the potential for loss to the same extent as securities convertible at the option of the holder. When the underlying common stocks rise in value, the value of convertible securities may also be expected to increase. At the same time, however, the difference between the market value of convertible securities and their conversion value will narrow, which means that the value of convertible securities will generally not increase to the same extent as the value of the underlying common stocks. Because convertible securities may also be interest-rate sensitive, their value may increase as interest rates fall and decrease as interest rates rise. Convertible securities are also subject to credit risk, and are often lower-quality securities.
Disruption to Financial Markets and Related Government Intervention. Economic downturns can trigger various economic, legal, budgetary, tax, and regulatory reforms across the globe. Instability in the financial markets in the wake of events such as the 2008 economic downturn led the U.S. Government and other governments to take a number of then-unprecedented actions designed to support certain financial institutions and segments of the financial markets that experienced extreme volatility, and in some cases, a lack of liquidity. Federal, state, local, foreign, and other governments, their regulatory agencies, or self-regulatory organizations may take actions that affect the regulation of the instruments in which a fund invests, or the issuers of such instruments, in ways that are unforeseeable. Reforms may also change the way in which a fund is regulated and could limit or preclude a fund's ability to achieve its investment objective or engage in certain strategies. Also, while reforms generally are intended to strengthen markets, systems, and public finances, they could affect fund expenses and the value of fund investments in unpredictable ways.
Similarly, widespread disease including pandemics and epidemics, and natural or environmental disasters, such as earthquakes, droughts, fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis and climate-related phenomena generally, have been and can be highly disruptive to economies and markets, adversely impacting individual companies, sectors, industries, markets, currencies, interest and inflation rates, credit ratings, investor sentiment, and other factors affecting the value of a fund's investments. Economies and financial markets throughout the world have become increasingly interconnected, which increases the likelihood that events or conditions in one region or country will adversely affect markets or issuers in other regions or countries, including the United States. Additionally, market disruptions may result in increased market volatility; regulatory trading halts; closure of domestic or foreign exchanges, markets, or governments; or market participants operating pursuant to business continuity plans for indeterminate periods of time. Further, market disruptions can (i) prevent a fund from executing advantageous investment decisions in a timely manner, (ii) negatively impact a fund's ability to achieve its investment objective, and (iii) may exacerbate the risks discussed elsewhere in a fund's registration statement, including political, social, and economic risks.
The value of a fund's portfolio is also generally subject to the risk of future local, national, or global economic or natural disturbances based on unknown weaknesses in the markets in which a fund invests. In the event of such a disturbance, the issuers of securities held by a fund may experience significant declines in the value of their assets and even cease operations, or may receive government assistance accompanied by increased restrictions on their business operations or other government intervention. In addition, it remains uncertain that the U.S. Government or foreign governments will intervene in response to current or future market disturbances and the effect of any such future intervention cannot be predicted.
Dollar-Weighted Average Maturity is derived by multiplying the value of each security by the time remaining to its maturity, adding these calculations, and then dividing the total by the value of a fund's portfolio. An obligation's maturity is typically determined on a stated final maturity basis, although there are some exceptions to this rule.
Under certain circumstances, a fund may invest in nominally long-term securities that have maturity-shortening features of shorter-term securities, and the maturities of these securities may be deemed to be earlier than their ultimate maturity dates by virtue of an existing demand feature or an adjustable interest rate. Under other circumstances, if it is probable that the issuer of an instrument will take advantage of a maturity-shortening device, such as a call, refunding, or redemption provision, the date on which the instrument will probably be called, refunded, or redeemed may be considered to be its maturity date. The maturities of mortgage securities, including collateralized mortgage obligations, and some asset-backed securities are determined on a weighted average life basis, which is the average time for principal to be repaid. For a mortgage security, this average time is calculated by estimating the timing of principal payments, including unscheduled prepayments, during the life of the mortgage. The weighted average life of these securities is likely to be substantially shorter than their stated final maturity.
Duration is a measure of a bond's price sensitivity to a change in its yield. For example, if a bond has a 5-year duration and its yield rises 1%, the bond's value is likely to fall about 5%. Similarly, if a bond fund has a 5-year average duration and the yield on each of the bonds held by the fund rises 1%, the fund's value is likely to fall about 5%. For funds with exposure to foreign markets, there are many reasons why all of the bond holdings do not experience the same yield changes. These reasons include: the bonds are spread off of different yield curves around the world and these yield curves do not move in tandem; the shapes of these yield curves change; and sector and issuer yield spreads change. Other factors can influence a bond fund's performance and share price. Accordingly, a bond fund's actual performance will likely differ from the example.
Exchange Traded Funds (ETFs) are shares of other investment companies, commodity pools, or other entities that are traded on an exchange. Typically, assets underlying the ETF shares are stocks, though they may also be commodities or other instruments. An ETF may seek to replicate the performance of a specific index or may be actively managed.
Typically, shares of an ETF that tracks an index are expected to increase in value as the value of the underlying benchmark increases. However, in the case of inverse ETFs (also called "short ETFs" or "bear ETFs"), ETF shares are expected to increase in value as the value of the underlying benchmark decreases. Inverse ETFs seek to deliver the opposite of the performance of the benchmark they track and are often marketed as a way for investors to profit from, or at least hedge their exposure to, downward moving markets. Investments in inverse ETFs are similar to holding short positions in the underlying benchmark.
ETF shares are redeemable only in large blocks of shares often called "creation units" by persons other than a fund, and are redeemed principally in-kind at each day's next calculated net asset value per share (NAV). ETFs typically incur fees that are separate from those fees incurred directly by a fund. A fund's purchase of ETFs results in the layering of expenses, such that the fund would indirectly bear a proportionate share of any ETF's operating expenses. Further, while traditional investment companies are continuously offered at NAV, ETFs are traded in the secondary market (e.g., on a stock exchange) on an intra-day basis at prices that may be above or below the value of their underlying portfolios.
Some of the risks of investing in an ETF that tracks an index are similar to those of investing in an indexed mutual fund, including tracking error risk (the risk of errors in matching the ETF's underlying assets to the index or other benchmark); and the risk that because an ETF that tracks an index is not actively managed, it cannot sell stocks or other assets as long as they are represented in the index or other benchmark. Other ETF risks include the risk that ETFs may trade in the secondary market at a discount from their NAV and the risk that the ETFs may not be liquid. ETFs also may be leveraged. Leveraged ETFs seek to deliver multiples of the performance of the index or other benchmark they track and use derivatives in an effort to amplify the returns (or decline, in the case of inverse ETFs) of the underlying index or benchmark. While leveraged ETFs may offer the potential for greater return, the potential for loss and the speed at which losses can be realized also are greater. Most leveraged and inverse ETFs "reset" daily, meaning they are designed to achieve their stated objectives on a daily basis. Leveraged and inverse ETFs can deviate substantially from the performance of their underlying benchmark over longer periods of time, particularly in volatile periods.
Exchange Traded Notes (ETNs) are a type of senior, unsecured, unsubordinated debt security issued by financial institutions that combines aspects of both bonds and ETFs. An ETN's returns are based on the performance of a market index or other reference asset minus fees and expenses. Similar to ETFs, ETNs are listed on an exchange and traded in the secondary market. However, unlike an ETF, an ETN can be held until the ETN's maturity, at which time the issuer will pay a return linked to the performance of the market index or other reference asset to which the ETN is linked minus certain fees. Unlike regular bonds, ETNs typically do not make periodic interest payments and principal typically is not protected.
ETNs also incur certain expenses not incurred by their applicable index. The market value of an ETN is determined by supply and demand, the current performance of the index or other reference asset, and the credit rating of the ETN issuer. The market value of ETN shares may differ from their intraday indicative value. The value of an ETN may also change due to a change in the issuer's credit rating. As a result, there may be times when an ETN's share trades at a premium or discount to its NAV. Some ETNs that use leverage in an effort to amplify the returns of an underlying index or other reference asset can, at times, be relatively illiquid and, thus, they may be difficult to purchase or sell at a fair price. Leveraged ETNs may offer the potential for greater return, but the potential for loss and speed at which losses can be realized also are greater.
Exposure to Foreign and Emerging Markets. Foreign securities, foreign currencies, and securities issued by U.S. entities with substantial foreign operations may involve significant risks in addition to the risks inherent in U.S. investments.
Foreign investments involve risks relating to local political, economic, regulatory, or social instability, military action or unrest, or adverse diplomatic developments, and may be affected by actions of foreign governments adverse to the interests of U.S. investors. Such actions may include expropriation or nationalization of assets, confiscatory taxation, restrictions on U.S. investment or on the ability to repatriate assets or convert currency into U.S. dollars, or other government intervention. From time to time, a fund's adviser and/or its affiliates may determine that, as a result of regulatory requirements that may apply to the adviser and/or its affiliates due to investments in a particular country, investments in the securities of issuers domiciled or listed on trading markets in that country above certain thresholds (which may apply at the account level or in the aggregate across all accounts managed by the adviser and its affiliates) may be impractical or undesirable. In such instances, the adviser may limit or exclude investment in a particular issuer, and investment flexibility may be restricted. Additionally, governmental issuers of foreign debt securities may be unwilling to pay interest and repay principal when due and may require that the conditions for payment be renegotiated. There is no assurance that a fund's adviser will be able to anticipate these potential events or counter their effects. In addition, the value of securities denominated in foreign currencies and of dividends and interest paid with respect to such securities will fluctuate based on the relative strength of the U.S. dollar.
It is anticipated that in most cases the best available market for foreign securities will be on an exchange or in over-the-counter (OTC) markets located outside of the United States. Foreign stock markets, while growing in volume and sophistication, are generally not as developed as those in the United States, and securities of some foreign issuers may be less liquid and more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. issuers. Foreign security trading, settlement and custodial practices (including those involving securities settlement where fund assets may be released prior to receipt of payment) are often less developed than those in U.S. markets, and may result in increased investment or valuation risk or substantial delays in the event of a failed trade or the insolvency of, or breach of duty by, a foreign broker-dealer, securities depository, or foreign subcustodian. In addition, the costs associated with foreign investments, including withholding taxes, brokerage commissions, and custodial costs, are generally higher than with U.S. investments.
Foreign markets may offer less protection to investors than U.S. markets. Foreign issuers are generally not bound by uniform accounting, auditing, and financial reporting requirements and standards of practice comparable to those applicable to U.S. issuers. Adequate public information on foreign issuers may not be available, and it may be difficult to secure dividends and information regarding corporate actions on a timely basis. In general, there is less overall governmental supervision and regulation of securities exchanges, brokers, and listed companies than in the United States. OTC markets tend to be less regulated than stock exchange markets and, in certain countries, may be totally unregulated. Regulatory enforcement may be influenced by economic or political concerns, and investors may have difficulty enforcing their legal rights in foreign countries.
Some foreign securities impose restrictions on transfer within the United States or to U.S. persons. Although securities subject to such transfer restrictions may be marketable abroad, they may be less liquid than foreign securities of the same class that are not subject to such restrictions.
American Depositary Receipts (ADRs) as well as other "hybrid" forms of ADRs, including European Depositary Receipts (EDRs) and Global Depositary Receipts (GDRs), are certificates evidencing ownership of shares of a foreign issuer. These certificates are issued by depository banks and generally trade on an established market in the United States or elsewhere. The underlying shares are held in trust by a custodian bank or similar financial institution in the issuer's home country. The depository bank may not have physical custody of the underlying securities at all times and may charge fees for various services, including forwarding dividends and interest and corporate actions. ADRs are alternatives to directly purchasing the underlying foreign securities in their national markets and currencies. However, ADRs continue to be subject to many of the risks associated with investing directly in foreign securities. These risks include foreign exchange risk as well as the political and economic risks of the underlying issuer's country.
The risks of foreign investing may be magnified for investments in emerging markets. Security prices in emerging markets can be significantly more volatile than those in more developed markets, reflecting the greater uncertainties of investing in less established markets and economies. In particular, countries with emerging markets may have relatively unstable governments, may present the risks of nationalization of businesses, restrictions on foreign ownership and prohibitions on the repatriation of assets, and may have less protection of property rights than more developed countries. The economies of countries with emerging markets may be based on only a few industries, may be highly vulnerable to changes in local or global trade conditions, and may suffer from extreme and volatile debt burdens or inflation rates. Local securities markets may trade a small number of securities and may be unable to respond effectively to increases in trading volume, potentially making prompt liquidation of holdings difficult or impossible at times.
Foreign Currency Transactions. A fund may conduct foreign currency transactions on a spot (i.e., cash) or forward basis (i.e., by entering into forward contracts to purchase or sell foreign currencies). Although foreign exchange dealers generally do not charge a fee for such conversions, they do realize a profit based on the difference between the prices at which they are buying and selling various currencies. Thus, a dealer may offer to sell a foreign currency at one rate, while offering a lesser rate of exchange should the counterparty desire to resell that currency to the dealer. Forward contracts are customized transactions that require a specific amount of a currency to be delivered at a specific exchange rate on a specific date or range of dates in the future. Forward contracts are generally traded in an interbank market directly between currency traders (usually large commercial banks) and their customers. The parties to a forward contract may agree to offset or terminate the contract before its maturity, or may hold the contract to maturity and complete the contemplated currency exchange.
The following discussion summarizes the principal currency management strategies involving forward contracts that could be used by a fund. A fund may also use swap agreements, indexed securities, and options and futures contracts relating to foreign currencies for the same purposes. Forward contracts not calling for physical delivery of the underlying instrument will be settled through cash payments rather than through delivery of the underlying currency. All of these instruments and transactions are subject to the risk that the counterparty will default.
A "settlement hedge" or "transaction hedge" is designed to protect a fund against an adverse change in foreign currency values between the date a security denominated in a foreign currency is purchased or sold and the date on which payment is made or received. Entering into a forward contract for the purchase or sale of the amount of foreign currency involved in an underlying security transaction for a fixed amount of U.S. dollars "locks in" the U.S. dollar price of the security. Forward contracts to purchase or sell a foreign currency may also be used to protect a fund in anticipation of future purchases or sales of securities denominated in foreign currency, even if the specific investments have not yet been selected.
A fund may also use forward contracts to hedge against a decline in the value of existing investments denominated in a foreign currency. For example, if a fund owned securities denominated in pounds sterling, it could enter into a forward contract to sell pounds sterling in return for U.S. dollars to hedge against possible declines in the pound's value. Such a hedge, sometimes referred to as a "position hedge," would tend to offset both positive and negative currency fluctuations, but would not offset changes in security values caused by other factors. A fund could also attempt to hedge the position by selling another currency expected to perform similarly to the pound sterling. This type of hedge, sometimes referred to as a "proxy hedge," could offer advantages in terms of cost, yield, or efficiency, but generally would not hedge currency exposure as effectively as a direct hedge into U.S. dollars. Proxy hedges may result in losses if the currency used to hedge does not perform similarly to the currency in which the hedged securities are denominated.
A fund may enter into forward contracts to shift its investment exposure from one currency into another. This may include shifting exposure from U.S. dollars to a foreign currency, or from one foreign currency to another foreign currency. This type of strategy, sometimes known as a "cross-hedge," will tend to reduce or eliminate exposure to the currency that is sold, and increase exposure to the currency that is purchased, much as if a fund had sold a security denominated in one currency and purchased an equivalent security denominated in another. A fund may cross-hedge its U.S. dollar exposure in order to achieve a representative weighted mix of the major currencies in its benchmark index and/or to cover an underweight country or region exposure in its portfolio. Cross-hedges protect against losses resulting from a decline in the hedged currency, but will cause a fund to assume the risk of fluctuations in the value of the currency it purchases.
Successful use of currency management strategies will depend on an adviser's skill in analyzing currency values. Currency management strategies may substantially change a fund's investment exposure to changes in currency exchange rates and could result in losses to a fund if currencies do not perform as an adviser anticipates. For example, if a currency's value rose at a time when a fund had hedged its position by selling that currency in exchange for dollars, the fund would not participate in the currency's appreciation. If a fund hedges currency exposure through proxy hedges, the fund could realize currency losses from both the hedge and the security position if the two currencies do not move in tandem. Similarly, if a fund increases its exposure to a foreign currency and that currency's value declines, the fund will realize a loss. Foreign currency transactions involve the risk that anticipated currency movements will not be accurately predicted and that a fund's hedging strategies will be ineffective. Moreover, it is impossible to precisely forecast the market value of portfolio securities at the expiration of a foreign currency forward contract. Accordingly, a fund may be required to buy or sell additional currency on the spot market (and bear the expenses of such transaction), if an adviser's predictions regarding the movement of foreign currency or securities markets prove inaccurate.
A fund may be required to limit its hedging transactions in foreign currency forwards, futures, and options in order to maintain its classification as a "regulated investment company" under the Internal Revenue Code (Code). Hedging transactions could result in the application of the mark-to-market provisions of the Code, which may cause an increase (or decrease) in the amount of taxable dividends paid by a fund and could affect whether dividends paid by a fund are classified as capital gains or ordinary income. There is no assurance that an adviser's use of currency management strategies will be advantageous to a fund or that it will employ currency management strategies at appropriate times.
Options and Futures Relating to Foreign Currencies. Currency futures contracts are similar to forward currency exchange contracts, except that they are traded on exchanges (and have margin requirements) and are standardized as to contract size and delivery date. Most currency futures contracts call for payment or delivery in U.S. dollars. The underlying instrument of a currency option may be a foreign currency, which generally is purchased or delivered in exchange for U.S. dollars, or may be a futures contract. The purchaser of a currency call obtains the right to purchase the underlying currency, and the purchaser of a currency put obtains the right to sell the underlying currency.
The uses and risks of currency options and futures are similar to options and futures relating to securities or indexes, as discussed below. A fund may purchase and sell currency futures and may purchase and write currency options to increase or decrease its exposure to different foreign currencies. Currency options may also be purchased or written in conjunction with each other or with currency futures or forward contracts. Currency futures and options values can be expected to correlate with exchange rates, but may not reflect other factors that affect the value of a fund's investments. A currency hedge, for example, should protect a Yen-denominated security from a decline in the Yen, but will not protect a fund against a price decline resulting from deterioration in the issuer's creditworthiness. Because the value of a fund's foreign-denominated investments changes in response to many factors other than exchange rates, it may not be possible to match the amount of currency options and futures to the value of the fund's investments exactly over time.
Currency options traded on U.S. or other exchanges may be subject to position limits which may limit the ability of the fund to reduce foreign currency risk using such options.
Funds of Funds and Other Large Shareholders. Certain Fidelity ® funds and accounts (including funds of funds) invest in other funds ("underlying funds") and, as a result, may at times have substantial investments in one or more underlying funds.
An underlying fund may experience large redemptions or investments due to transactions in its shares by funds of funds, other large shareholders, or similarly managed accounts. While it is impossible to predict the overall effect of these transactions over time, there could be an adverse impact on an underlying fund's performance. In the event of such redemptions or investments, an underlying fund could be required to sell securities or to invest cash at a time when it may not otherwise desire to do so. Such transactions may increase an underlying fund's brokerage and/or other transaction costs and affect the liquidity of a fund's portfolio. In addition, when funds of funds or other investors own a substantial portion of an underlying fund's shares, a large redemption by such an investor could cause actual expenses to increase, or could result in the underlying fund's current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the underlying fund's expense ratio. Redemptions of underlying fund shares could also accelerate the realization of taxable capital gains in the fund if sales of securities result in capital gains. The impact of these transactions is likely to be greater when a fund of funds or other significant investor purchases, redeems, or owns a substantial portion of the underlying fund's shares.
When possible, Fidelity will consider how to minimize these potential adverse effects, and may take such actions as it deems appropriate to address potential adverse effects, including redemption of shares in-kind rather than in cash or carrying out the transactions over a period of time, although there can be no assurance that such actions will be successful. A high volume of redemption requests can impact an underlying fund the same way as the transactions of a single shareholder with substantial investments. As an additional safeguard, Fidelity ® fund of funds may manage the placement of their redemption requests in a manner designed to minimize the impact of such requests on the day-to-day operations of the underlying funds in which they invest. This may involve, for example, redeeming its shares of an underlying fund gradually over time.
Funds' Rights as Investors. Fidelity ® funds do not intend to direct or administer the day-to-day operations of any company. A fund may, however, exercise its rights as a shareholder or lender and may communicate its views on important matters of policy to a company's management, board of directors, and shareholders, and holders of a company's other securities when such matters could have a significant effect on the value of the fund's investment in the company. The activities in which a fund may engage, either individually or in conjunction with others, may include, among others, supporting or opposing proposed changes in a company's corporate structure or business activities; seeking changes in a company's directors or management; seeking changes in a company's direction or policies; seeking the sale or reorganization of the company or a portion of its assets; supporting or opposing third-party takeover efforts; supporting the filing of a bankruptcy petition; or foreclosing on collateral securing a security. This area of corporate activity is increasingly prone to litigation and it is possible that a fund could be involved in lawsuits related to such activities. Such activities will be monitored with a view to mitigating, to the extent possible, the risk of litigation against a fund and the risk of actual liability if a fund is involved in litigation. No guarantee can be made, however, that litigation against a fund will not be undertaken or liabilities incurred. A fund's proxy voting guidelines are included in its SAI.
Futures, Options, and Swaps. The success of any strategy involving futures, options, and swaps depends on an adviser's analysis of many economic and mathematical factors and a fund's return may be higher if it never invested in such instruments. Additionally, some of the contracts discussed below are new instruments without a trading history and there can be no assurance that a market for the instruments will continue to exist. Government legislation or regulation could affect the use of such instruments and could limit a fund's ability to pursue its investment strategies. If a fund invests a significant portion of its assets in derivatives, its investment exposure could far exceed the value of its portfolio securities and its investment performance could be primarily dependent upon securities it does not own.
The requirements for qualification as a regulated investment company may limit the extent to which a fund may enter into futures, options on futures, and forward contracts.
Futures Contracts. In purchasing a futures contract, the buyer agrees to purchase a specified underlying instrument at a specified future date. In selling a futures contract, the seller agrees to sell a specified underlying instrument at a specified date. Futures contracts are standardized, exchange-traded contracts and the price at which the purchase and sale will take place is fixed when the buyer and seller enter into the contract. Some currently available futures contracts are based on specific securities or baskets of securities, some are based on commodities or commodities indexes (for funds that seek commodities exposure), and some are based on indexes of securities prices (including foreign indexes for funds that seek foreign exposure). In addition, some currently available futures contracts are based on Eurodollars. Positions in Eurodollar futures reflect market expectations of forward levels of three-month London Interbank Offered Rate (LIBOR) rates. Futures on indexes and futures not calling for physical delivery of the underlying instrument will be settled through cash payments rather than through delivery of the underlying instrument. Futures can be held until their delivery dates, or can be closed out by offsetting purchases or sales of futures contracts before then if a liquid market is available. A fund may realize a gain or loss by closing out its futures contracts.
The value of a futures contract tends to increase and decrease in tandem with the value of its underlying instrument. Therefore, purchasing futures contracts will tend to increase a fund's exposure to positive and negative price fluctuations in the underlying instrument, much as if it had purchased the underlying instrument directly. When a fund sells a futures contract, by contrast, the value of its futures position will tend to move in a direction contrary to the market for the underlying instrument. Selling futures contracts, therefore, will tend to offset both positive and negative market price changes, much as if the underlying instrument had been sold.
The purchaser or seller of a futures contract or an option for a futures contract is not required to deliver or pay for the underlying instrument or the final cash settlement price, as applicable, unless the contract is held until the delivery date. However, both the purchaser and seller are required to deposit "initial margin" with a futures broker, known as a futures commission merchant, when the contract is entered into. If the value of either party's position declines, that party will be required to make additional "variation margin" payments to settle the change in value on a daily basis. This process of "marking to market" will be reflected in the daily calculation of open positions computed in a fund's NAV. The party that has a gain is entitled to receive all or a portion of this amount. Initial and variation margin payments do not constitute purchasing securities on margin for purposes of a fund's investment limitations. Variation margin does not represent a borrowing or loan by a fund, but is instead a settlement between a fund and the futures commission merchant of the amount one would owe the other if the fund's contract expired. In the event of the bankruptcy or insolvency of a futures commission merchant that holds margin on behalf of a fund, the fund may be entitled to return of margin owed to it only in proportion to the amount received by the futures commission merchant's other customers, potentially resulting in losses to the fund.
Although futures exchanges generally operate similarly in the United States and abroad, foreign futures exchanges may follow trading, settlement, and margin procedures that are different from those for U.S. exchanges. Futures contracts traded outside the United States may not involve a clearing mechanism or related guarantees and may involve greater risk of loss than U.S.-traded contracts, including potentially greater risk of losses due to insolvency of a futures broker, exchange member, or other party that may owe initial or variation margin to a fund. Because initial and variation margin payments may be measured in foreign currency, a futures contract traded outside the United States may also involve the risk of foreign currency fluctuation.
There is no assurance a liquid market will exist for any particular futures contract at any particular time. Exchanges may establish daily price fluctuation limits for futures contracts, and may halt trading if a contract's price moves upward or downward more than the limit in a given day. On volatile trading days when the price fluctuation limit is reached or a trading halt is imposed, it may be impossible to enter into new positions or close out existing positions. The daily limit governs only price movements during a particular trading day and therefore does not limit potential losses because the limit may work to prevent the liquidation of unfavorable positions. For example, futures prices have occasionally moved to the daily limit for several consecutive trading days with little or no trading, thereby preventing prompt liquidation of positions and subjecting some holders of futures contracts to substantial losses.
If the market for a contract is not liquid because of price fluctuation limits or other market conditions, it could prevent prompt liquidation of unfavorable positions, and potentially could require a fund to continue to hold a position until delivery or expiration regardless of changes in its value. These risks may be heightened for commodity futures contracts, which have historically been subject to greater price volatility than exists for instruments such as stocks and bonds.
Because there are a limited number of types of exchange-traded futures contracts, it is likely that the standardized contracts available will not match a fund's current or anticipated investments exactly. A fund may invest in futures contracts based on securities with different issuers, maturities, or other characteristics from the securities in which the fund typically invests, which involves a risk that the futures position will not track the performance of the fund's other investments.
Futures prices can also diverge from the prices of their underlying instruments, even if the underlying instruments match a fund's investments well. Futures prices are affected by such factors as current and anticipated short-term interest rates, changes in volatility of the underlying instrument, and the time remaining until expiration of the contract, which may not affect security prices the same way. Imperfect correlation may also result from differing levels of demand in the futures markets and the securities markets, from structural differences in how futures and securities are traded, or from imposition of daily price fluctuation limits or trading halts. A fund may purchase or sell futures contracts with a greater or lesser value than the securities it wishes to hedge or intends to purchase in order to attempt to compensate for differences in volatility between the contract and the securities, although this may not be successful in all cases. If price changes in a fund's futures positions are poorly correlated with its other investments, the positions may fail to produce anticipated gains or result in losses that are not offset by gains in other investments. In addition, the price of a commodity futures contract can reflect the storage costs associated with the purchase of the physical commodity.
Futures contracts on U.S. Government securities historically have reacted to an increase or decrease in interest rates in a manner similar to the manner in which the underlying U.S. Government securities reacted. To the extent, however, that a fund enters into such futures contracts, the value of these futures contracts will not vary in direct proportion to the value of the fund's holdings of U.S. Government securities. Thus, the anticipated spread between the price of the futures contract and the hedged security may be distorted due to differences in the nature of the markets. The spread also may be distorted by differences in initial and variation margin requirements, the liquidity of such markets and the participation of speculators in such markets.
Options. By purchasing a put option, the purchaser obtains the right (but not the obligation) to sell the option's underlying instrument at a fixed strike price. In return for this right, the purchaser pays the current market price for the option (known as the option premium). Options have various types of underlying instruments, including specific assets or securities, baskets of assets or securities, indexes of securities or commodities prices, and futures contracts (including commodity futures contracts). Options may be traded on an exchange or OTC. The purchaser may terminate its position in a put option by allowing it to expire or by exercising the option. If the option is allowed to expire, the purchaser will lose the entire premium. If the option is exercised, the purchaser completes the sale of the underlying instrument at the strike price. Depending on the terms of the contract, upon exercise, an option may require physical delivery of the underlying instrument or may be settled through cash payments. A purchaser may also terminate a put option position by closing it out in the secondary market at its current price, if a liquid secondary market exists.
The buyer of a typical put option can expect to realize a gain if the underlying instrument's price falls substantially. However, if the underlying instrument's price does not fall enough to offset the cost of purchasing the option, a put buyer can expect to suffer a loss (limited to the amount of the premium, plus related transaction costs).
The features of call options are essentially the same as those of put options, except that the purchaser of a call option obtains the right (but not the obligation) to purchase, rather than sell, the underlying instrument at the option's strike price. A call buyer typically attempts to participate in potential price increases of the underlying instrument with risk limited to the cost of the option if the underlying instrument's price falls. At the same time, the buyer can expect to suffer a loss if the underlying instrument's price does not rise sufficiently to offset the cost of the option.
The writer of a put or call option takes the opposite side of the transaction from the option's purchaser. In return for receipt of the premium, the writer assumes the obligation to pay or receive the strike price for the option's underlying instrument if the other party to the option chooses to exercise it. The writer may seek to terminate a position in a put option before exercise by closing out the option in the secondary market at its current price. If the secondary market is not liquid for a put option, however, the writer must continue to be prepared to pay the strike price while the option is outstanding, regardless of price changes. When writing an option on a futures contract, a fund will be required to make margin payments to a futures commission merchant as described above for futures contracts.
If the underlying instrument's price rises, a put writer would generally expect to profit, although its gain would be limited to the amount of the premium it received. If the underlying instrument's price remains the same over time, it is likely that the writer will also profit, because it should be able to close out the option at a lower price. If the underlying instrument's price falls, the put writer would expect to suffer a loss. This loss should be less than the loss from purchasing the underlying instrument directly, however, because the premium received for writing the option should mitigate the effects of the decline.
Writing a call option obligates the writer to sell or deliver the option's underlying instrument or make a net cash settlement payment, as applicable, in return for the strike price, upon exercise of the option. The characteristics of writing call options are similar to those of writing put options, except that writing calls generally is a profitable strategy if prices remain the same or fall. Through receipt of the option premium, a call writer should mitigate the effects of a price increase. At the same time, because a call writer must be prepared to deliver the underlying instrument or make a net cash settlement payment, as applicable, in return for the strike price, even if its current value is greater, a call writer gives up some ability to participate in price increases and, if a call writer does not hold the underlying instrument, a call writer's loss is theoretically unlimited.
Where a put or call option on a particular security is purchased to hedge against price movements in a related security, the price to close out the put or call option on the secondary market may move more or less than the price of the related security.
There is no assurance a liquid market will exist for any particular options contract at any particular time. Options may have relatively low trading volume and liquidity if their strike prices are not close to the underlying instrument's current price. In addition, exchanges may establish daily price fluctuation limits for exchange-traded options contracts, and may halt trading if a contract's price moves upward or downward more than the limit in a given day. On volatile trading days when the price fluctuation limit is reached or a trading halt is imposed, it may be impossible to enter into new positions or close out existing positions. If the market for a contract is not liquid because of price fluctuation limits or otherwise, it could prevent prompt liquidation of unfavorable positions, and potentially could require a fund to continue to hold a position until delivery or expiration regardless of changes in its value.
Unlike exchange-traded options, which are standardized with respect to the underlying instrument, expiration date, contract size, and strike price, the terms of OTC options (options not traded on exchanges) generally are established through negotiation with the other party to the option contract. While this type of arrangement allows the purchaser or writer greater flexibility to tailor an option to its needs, OTC options generally are less liquid and involve greater credit risk than exchange-traded options, which are backed by the clearing organization of the exchanges where they are traded.
Combined positions involve purchasing and writing options in combination with each other, or in combination with futures or forward contracts, to adjust the risk and return characteristics of the overall position. For example, purchasing a put option and writing a call option on the same underlying instrument would construct a combined position whose risk and return characteristics are similar to selling a futures contract. Another possible combined position would involve writing a call option at one strike price and buying a call option at a lower price, to reduce the risk of the written call option in the event of a substantial price increase. Because combined options positions involve multiple trades, they result in higher transaction costs and may be more difficult to open and close out.
A fund may also buy and sell options on swaps (swaptions), which are generally options on interest rate swaps. An option on a swap gives a party the right (but not the obligation) to enter into a new swap agreement or to extend, shorten, cancel or modify an existing contract at a specific date in the future in exchange for a premium. Depending on the terms of the particular option agreement, a fund will generally incur a greater degree of risk when it writes (sells) an option on a swap than it will incur when it purchases an option on a swap. When a fund purchases an option on a swap, it risks losing only the amount of the premium it has paid should it decide to let the option expire unexercised. However, when a fund writes an option on a swap, upon exercise of the option the fund will become obligated according to the terms of the underlying agreement. A fund that writes an option on a swap receives the premium and bears the risk of unfavorable changes in the preset rate on the underlying interest rate swap. Whether a fund's use of options on swaps will be successful in furthering its investment objective will depend on the adviser's ability to predict correctly whether certain types of investments are likely to produce greater returns than other investments. Options on swaps may involve risks similar to those discussed below in "Swap Agreements."
Because there are a limited number of types of exchange-traded options contracts, it is likely that the standardized contracts available will not match a fund's current or anticipated investments exactly. A fund may invest in options contracts based on securities with different issuers, maturities, or other characteristics from the securities in which the fund typically invests, which involves a risk that the options position will not track the performance of the fund's other investments.
Options prices can also diverge from the prices of their underlying instruments, even if the underlying instruments match a fund's investments well. Options prices are affected by such factors as current and anticipated short-term interest rates, changes in volatility of the underlying instrument, and the time remaining until expiration of the contract, which may not affect security prices the same way. Imperfect correlation may also result from differing levels of demand in the options and futures markets and the securities markets, from structural differences in how options and futures and securities are traded, or from imposition of daily price fluctuation limits or trading halts. A fund may purchase or sell options contracts with a greater or lesser value than the securities it wishes to hedge or intends to purchase in order to attempt to compensate for differences in volatility between the contract and the securities, although this may not be successful in all cases. If price changes in a fund's options positions are poorly correlated with its other investments, the positions may fail to produce anticipated gains or result in losses that are not offset by gains in other investments.
Swap Agreements. Swap agreements are two-party contracts entered into primarily by institutional investors. Cleared swaps are transacted through futures commission merchants that are members of central clearinghouses with the clearinghouse serving as a central counterparty similar to transactions in futures contracts. In a standard "swap" transaction, two parties agree to exchange one or more payments based, for example, on the returns (or differentials in rates of return) earned or realized on particular predetermined investments or instruments (such as securities, commodities, indexes, or other financial or economic interests). The gross payments to be exchanged between the parties are calculated with respect to a notional amount, which is the predetermined dollar principal of the trade representing the hypothetical underlying quantity upon which payment obligations are computed.
Swap agreements can take many different forms and are known by a variety of names, including interest rate swaps (where the parties exchange a floating rate for a fixed rate), asset swaps (e.g., where parties combine the purchase or sale of a bond with an interest rate swap), total return swaps, and credit default swaps. Depending on how they are used, swap agreements may increase or decrease the overall volatility of a fund's investments and its share price and, if applicable, its yield. Swap agreements are subject to liquidity risk, meaning that a fund may be unable to sell a swap contract to a third party at a favorable price. Certain standardized swap transactions are currently subject to mandatory central clearing or may be eligible for voluntary central clearing. Central clearing is expected to decrease counterparty risk and increase liquidity compared to uncleared swaps because central clearing interposes the central clearinghouse as the counterpart to each participant's swap. However, central clearing does not eliminate counterparty risk or illiquidity risk entirely. In addition depending on the size of a fund and other factors, the margin required under the rules of a clearinghouse and by a clearing member futures commission merchant may be in excess of the collateral required to be posted by a fund to support its obligations under a similar uncleared swap. However, regulators have adopted rules imposing certain margin requirements, including minimums, on certain uncleared swaps which could reduce the distinction.
A total return swap is a contract whereby one party agrees to make a series of payments to another party based on the change in the market value of the assets underlying such contract (which can include a security or other instrument, commodity, index or baskets thereof) during the specified period. In exchange, the other party to the contract agrees to make a series of payments calculated by reference to an interest rate and/or some other agreed-upon amount (including the change in market value of other underlying assets). A fund may use total return swaps to gain exposure to an asset without owning it or taking physical custody of it. For example, a fund investing in total return commodity swaps will receive the price appreciation of a commodity, commodity index or portion thereof in exchange for payment of an agreed-upon fee.
In a credit default swap, the credit default protection buyer makes periodic payments, known as premiums, to the credit default protection seller. In return the credit default protection seller will make a payment to the credit default protection buyer upon the occurrence of a specified credit event. A credit default swap can refer to a single issuer or asset, a basket of issuers or assets or index of assets, each known as the reference entity or underlying asset. A fund may act as either the buyer or the seller of a credit default swap. A fund may buy or sell credit default protection on a basket of issuers or assets, even if a number of the underlying assets referenced in the basket are lower-quality debt securities. In an unhedged credit default swap, a fund buys credit default protection on a single issuer or asset, a basket of issuers or assets or index of assets without owning the underlying asset or debt issued by the reference entity. Credit default swaps involve greater and different risks than investing directly in the referenced asset, because, in addition to market risk, credit default swaps include liquidity, counterparty and operational risk.
Credit default swaps allow a fund to acquire or reduce credit exposure to a particular issuer, asset or basket of assets. If a swap agreement calls for payments by a fund, the fund must be prepared to make such payments when due. If a fund is the credit default protection seller, the fund will experience a loss if a credit event occurs and the credit of the reference entity or underlying asset has deteriorated. If a fund is the credit default protection buyer, the fund will be required to pay premiums to the credit default protection seller. In the case of a physically settled credit default swap in which a fund is the protection seller, the fund must be prepared to pay par for and take possession of debt of a defaulted issuer delivered to the fund by the credit default protection buyer. Any loss would be offset by the premium payments the fund receives as the seller of credit default protection.
If the creditworthiness of a fund's swap counterparty declines, the risk that the counterparty may not perform could increase, potentially resulting in a loss to the fund. To limit the counterparty risk involved in swap agreements, a Fidelity ® fund will enter into swap agreements only with counterparties that meet certain standards of creditworthiness. This risk for cleared swaps is generally lower than for uncleared swaps since the counterparty is a clearinghouse, but there can be no assurance that a clearinghouse or its members will satisfy its obligations. Although there can be no assurance that a fund will be able to do so, a fund may be able to reduce or eliminate its exposure under a swap agreement either by assignment or other disposition, or by entering into an offsetting swap agreement with the same party or another creditworthy party. A fund may have limited ability to eliminate its exposure under a credit default swap if the credit of the reference entity or underlying asset has declined.
A fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under a swap agreement in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap agreement counterparty. A fund would generally be required to provide margin or collateral for the benefit of that counterparty. If a counterparty to a swap transaction becomes insolvent, the fund may be limited temporarily or permanently in exercising its right to the return of related fund assets designated as margin or collateral in an action against the counterparty.
Swap agreements are subject to the risk that the market value of the instrument will change in a way detrimental to a fund's interest. A fund bears the risk that an adviser will not accurately forecast market trends or the values of assets, reference rates, indexes, or other economic factors in establishing swap positions for a fund. If an adviser attempts to use a swap as a hedge against, or as a substitute for, a portfolio investment, a fund may be exposed to the risk that the swap will have or will develop imperfect or no correlation with the portfolio investment, which could cause substantial losses for a fund. While hedging strategies involving swap instruments can reduce the risk of loss, they can also reduce the opportunity for gain or even result in losses by offsetting favorable price movements in other fund investments. Swaps are complex and often valued subjectively.
Hybrid and Preferred Securities. A hybrid security may be a debt security, warrant, convertible security, certificate of deposit or other evidence of indebtedness on which the value of the interest on or principal of which is determined by reference to changes in the value of a reference instrument or financial strength of a reference entity (e.g., a security or other financial instrument, asset, currency, interest rate, commodity, index, or business entity such as a financial institution). Another example is contingent convertible securities, which are fixed income securities that, under certain circumstances, either convert into common stock of the issuer or undergo a principal write-down by a predetermined percentage if the issuer's capital ratio falls below a predetermined trigger level. The liquidation value of such a security may be reduced upon a regulatory action and without the need for a bankruptcy proceeding. Preferred securities may take the form of preferred stock and represent an equity or ownership interest in an issuer that pays dividends at a specified rate and that has precedence over common stock in the payment of dividends. In the event an issuer is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds generally take precedence over the claims of those who own preferred and common stock.
The risks of investing in hybrid and preferred securities reflect a combination of the risks of investing in securities, options, futures and currencies. An investment in a hybrid or preferred security may entail significant risks that are not associated with a similar investment in a traditional debt or equity security. The risks of a particular hybrid or preferred security will depend upon the terms of the instrument, but may include the possibility of significant changes in the value of any applicable reference instrument. Such risks may depend upon factors unrelated to the operations or credit quality of the issuer of the hybrid or preferred security. Hybrid and preferred securities are potentially more volatile and carry greater market and liquidity risks than traditional debt or equity securities. Also, the price of the hybrid or preferred security and any applicable reference instrument may not move in the same direction or at the same time. In addition, because hybrid and preferred securities may be traded over-the-counter or in bilateral transactions with the issuer of the security, hybrid and preferred securities may be subject to the creditworthiness of the counterparty of the security and their values may decline substantially if the counterparty's creditworthiness deteriorates. In addition, uncertainty regarding the tax and regulatory treatment of hybrid and preferred securities may reduce demand for such securities and tax and regulatory considerations may limit the extent of a fund's investments in certain hybrid and preferred securities.
Illiquid Investments means any investment that cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment. Difficulty in selling or disposing of illiquid investments may result in a loss or may be costly to a fund. Illiquid securities may include (1) repurchase agreements maturing in more than seven days without demand/redemption features, (2) OTC options and certain other derivatives, (3) private placements, (4) securities traded on markets and exchanges with structural constraints, and (5) loan participations.
Under the supervision of the Board of Trustees, a Fidelity ® fund's adviser classifies the liquidity of the fund's investments and monitors the extent of funds' illiquid investments.
Various market, trading and investment-specific factors may be considered in determining the liquidity of a fund's investments including, but not limited to (1) the existence of an active trading market, (2) the nature of the security and the market in which it trades, (3) the number, diversity, and quality of dealers and prospective purchasers in the marketplace, (4) the frequency, volume, and volatility of trade and price quotations, (5) bid-ask spreads, (6) dates of issuance and maturity, (7) demand, put or tender features, and (8) restrictions on trading or transferring the investment.
Fidelity classifies certain investments as illiquid based upon these criteria. Fidelity also monitors for certain market, trading and investment-specific events that may cause Fidelity to re-evaluate an investment's liquidity status and may lead to an investment being classified as illiquid. In addition, Fidelity uses a third-party to assist with the liquidity classifications of the fund's investments, which includes calculating the time to sell and settle a specified size position in a particular investment without the sale significantly changing the market value of the investment.
Increasing Government Debt. The total public debt of the United States and other countries around the globe as a percent of gross domestic product has grown rapidly since the beginning of the 2008 financial downturn. Although high debt levels do not necessarily indicate or cause economic problems, they may create certain systemic risks if sound debt management practices are not implemented.
A high national debt level may increase market pressures to meet government funding needs, which may drive debt cost higher and cause a country to sell additional debt, thereby increasing refinancing risk. A high national debt also raises concerns that a government will not be able to make principal or interest payments when they are due. In the worst case, unsustainable debt levels can decline the valuation of currencies, and can prevent a government from implementing effective counter-cyclical fiscal policy in economic downturns.
On August 5, 2011, Standard & Poor's Ratings Services lowered its long-term sovereign credit rating on the United States one level to "AA+" from "AAA." While Standard & Poor's Ratings Services affirmed the United States' short-term sovereign credit rating as "A-1+," there is no guarantee that Standard & Poor's Ratings Services will not decide to lower this rating in the future. Standard & Poor's Ratings Services stated that its decision was prompted by its view on the rising public debt burden and its perception of greater policymaking uncertainty. The market prices and yields of securities supported by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government may be adversely affected by Standard & Poor's Ratings Services decisions to downgrade the long-term sovereign credit rating of the United States.
Indexed Securities are instruments whose prices are indexed to the prices of other securities, securities indexes, or other financial indicators. Indexed securities typically, but not always, are debt securities or deposits whose values at maturity or coupon rates are determined by reference to a specific instrument, statistic, or measure.
Indexed securities also include commercial paper, certificates of deposit, and other fixed-income securities whose values at maturity or coupon interest rates are determined by reference to the returns of particular stock indexes. Indexed securities can be affected by stock prices as well as changes in interest rates and the creditworthiness of their issuers and may not track the indexes as accurately as direct investments in the indexes.
Commodity-indexed securities, for example, can be indexed to a commodities index such as the Bloomberg Commodity Index.
Gold-indexed securities typically provide for a maturity value that depends on the price of gold, resulting in a security whose price tends to rise and fall together with gold prices.
Currency-indexed securities typically are short-term to intermediate-term debt securities whose maturity values or interest rates are determined by reference to the values of one or more specified foreign currencies, and may offer higher yields than U.S. dollar-denominated securities. Currency-indexed securities may be positively or negatively indexed; that is, their maturity value may increase when the specified currency value increases, resulting in a security that performs similarly to a foreign-denominated instrument, or their maturity value may decline when foreign currencies increase, resulting in a security whose price characteristics are similar to a put on the underlying currency. Currency-indexed securities may also have prices that depend on the values of a number of different foreign currencies relative to each other.
The performance of indexed securities depends to a great extent on the performance of the instrument or measure to which they are indexed, and may also be influenced by interest rate changes in the United States and abroad. Indexed securities may be more volatile than the underlying instruments or measures. Indexed securities are also subject to the credit risks associated with the issuer of the security, and their values may decline substantially if the issuer's creditworthiness deteriorates. Recent issuers of indexed securities have included banks, corporations, and certain U.S. Government agencies.
Fidelity Asset Manager ® 70% and Fidelity Asset Manager ® 85% may purchase securities indexed to the price of precious metals as an alternative to direct investment in precious metals. Because the value of these securities is directly linked to the price of gold or other precious metals, they involve risks and pricing characteristics similar to direct investments in precious metals. A fund will purchase precious metals-indexed securities only when its adviser is satisfied with the creditworthiness of the issuers liable for payment. The securities generally will earn a nominal rate of interest while held by a fund, and may have maturities of one year or more. In addition, the securities may be subject to being put by a fund to the issuer, with payment to be received on no more than seven days' notice. The put feature would ensure the liquidity of the notes in the absence of an active secondary market.
Insolvency of Issuers, Counterparties, and Intermediaries. Issuers of fund portfolio securities or counterparties to fund transactions that become insolvent or declare bankruptcy can pose special investment risks. In each circumstance, risk of loss, valuation uncertainty, increased illiquidity, and other unpredictable occurrences may negatively impact an investment. Each of these risks may be amplified in foreign markets, where security trading, settlement, and custodial practices can be less developed than those in the U.S. markets, and bankruptcy laws differ from those of the U.S.
As a general matter, if the issuer of a fund portfolio security is liquidated or declares bankruptcy, the claims of owners of bonds and preferred stock have priority over the claims of common stock owners. These events can negatively impact the value of the issuer's securities and the results of related proceedings can be unpredictable.
If a counterparty to a fund transaction, such as a swap transaction, a short sale, a borrowing, or other complex transaction becomes insolvent, the fund may be limited in its ability to exercise rights to obtain the return of related fund assets or in exercising other rights against the counterparty. Uncertainty may also arise upon the insolvency of a securities or commodities intermediary such as a broker-dealer or futures commission merchant with which a fund has pending transactions. In addition, insolvency and liquidation proceedings take time to resolve, which can limit or preclude a fund's ability to terminate a transaction or obtain related assets or collateral in a timely fashion. If an intermediary becomes insolvent, while securities positions and other holdings may be protected by U.S. or foreign laws, it is sometimes difficult to determine whether these protections are available to specific trades based on the circumstances. Receiving the benefit of these protections can also take time to resolve, which may result in illiquid positions.
Interfund Borrowing and Lending Program. Pursuant to an exemptive order issued by the SEC, a Fidelity ® fund may lend money to, and borrow money from, other funds advised by FMR or its affiliates. A Fidelity ® fund will borrow through the program only when the costs are equal to or lower than the costs of bank loans. A Fidelity ® fund will lend through the program only when the returns are higher than those available from an investment in repurchase agreements. Interfund loans and borrowings normally extend overnight, but can have a maximum duration of seven days. Loans may be called on one day's notice. A Fidelity ® fund may have to borrow from a bank at a higher interest rate if an interfund loan is called or not renewed. Any delay in repayment to a lending fund could result in a lost investment opportunity or additional borrowing costs.
Investment-Grade Debt Securities. Investment-grade debt securities include all types of debt instruments that are of medium and high-quality. Investment-grade debt securities include repurchase agreements collateralized by U.S. Government securities as well as repurchase agreements collateralized by equity securities, non-investment-grade debt, and all other instruments in which a fund can perfect a security interest, provided the repurchase agreement counterparty has an investment-grade rating. Some investment-grade debt securities may possess speculative characteristics and may be more sensitive to economic changes and to changes in the financial conditions of issuers. An investment-grade rating means the security or issuer is rated investment-grade by a credit rating agency registered as a nationally recognized statistical rating organization (NRSRO) with the SEC (for example, Moody's Investors Service, Inc.), or is unrated but considered to be of equivalent quality by a fund's adviser. For purposes of determining the maximum maturity of an investment-grade debt security, an adviser may take into account normal settlement periods.
Loans and Other Direct Debt Instruments. Direct debt instruments are interests in amounts owed by a corporate, governmental, or other borrower to lenders or lending syndicates (loans and loan participations), to suppliers of goods or services (trade claims or other receivables), or to other parties. Direct debt instruments involve a risk of loss in case of default or insolvency of the borrower and may offer less legal protection to the purchaser in the event of fraud or misrepresentation, or there may be a requirement that a fund supply additional cash to a borrower on demand. A fund may acquire loans by buying an assignment of all or a portion of the loan from a lender or by purchasing a loan participation from a lender or other purchaser of a participation. If permitted by its investment policies, a fund also may originate or otherwise acquire loans directly at the time of the loan's closing.
Lenders and purchasers of loans and other forms of direct indebtedness depend primarily upon the creditworthiness of the borrower and/or any collateral for payment of interest and repayment of principal. If scheduled interest or principal payments are not made, the value of the instrument may be adversely affected. Loans that are fully secured provide more protections than an unsecured loan in the event of failure to make scheduled interest or principal payments. However, there is no assurance that the liquidation of collateral from a secured loan would satisfy the borrower's obligation, or that the collateral could be liquidated. Indebtedness of borrowers whose creditworthiness is poor involves substantially greater risks and may be highly speculative. Different types of assets may be used as collateral for a fund's loans and there can be no assurance that a fund will correctly evaluate the value of the assets collateralizing the fund's loans. Borrowers that are in bankruptcy or restructuring may never pay off their indebtedness, or may pay only a small fraction of the amount owed. In any restructuring or bankruptcy proceedings relating to a borrower funded by a fund, a fund may be required to accept collateral with less value than the amount of the loan made by the fund to the borrower. Direct indebtedness of foreign countries also involves a risk that the governmental entities responsible for the repayment of the debt may be unable, or unwilling, to pay interest and repay principal when due.
Loans and other types of direct indebtedness (which a fund may originate, acquire or otherwise gain exposure to) may not be readily marketable and may be subject to restrictions on resale. Some indebtedness may be difficult to dispose of readily at what the Adviser believes to be a fair price. In addition, valuation of illiquid indebtedness involves a greater degree of judgment in determining a fund's net asset value than if that value were based on readily available market quotations, and could result in significant variations in a fund's daily share price. Some loan interests are traded among certain financial institutions and accordingly may be deemed liquid. As the market for different types of indebtedness develops, the liquidity of these instruments is expected to improve.
Direct lending and investments in loans through direct assignment of a financial institution's interests with respect to a loan may involve additional risks. For example, if a loan is foreclosed, the lender/purchaser could become part owner of any collateral, and would bear the costs and liabilities associated with owning and disposing of the collateral. In the event of a default by the borrower, a fund may have difficulty disposing of the assets used as collateral for a loan. In addition, a purchaser could be held liable as a co-lender. Direct debt instruments may also involve a risk of insolvency of the lending bank or other intermediary.
A loan is often administered by a bank or other financial institution that acts as agent for all holders. The agent administers the terms of the loan, as specified in the loan agreement. Unless, under the terms of the loan or other indebtedness, the purchaser has direct recourse against the borrower, the purchaser may have to rely on the agent to apply appropriate credit remedies against a borrower. If assets held by the agent for the benefit of a purchaser were determined to be subject to the claims of the agent's general creditors, the purchaser might incur certain costs and delays in realizing payment on the loan or loan participation and could suffer a loss of principal or interest. Direct loans are typically not administered by an underwriter or agent bank. The terms of direct loans are negotiated with borrowers in private transactions. Direct loans are not publicly traded and may not have a secondary market.
A fund may seek to dispose of loans in certain cases, to the extent possible, through selling participations in the loan. In that case, a fund would remain subject to certain obligations, which may result in expenses for a fund and certain additional risks.
Direct indebtedness may include letters of credit, revolving credit facilities, or other standby financing commitments that obligate lenders/purchasers, including a fund, to make additional cash payments on demand. These commitments may have the effect of requiring a lender/purchaser to increase its investment in a borrower at a time when it would not otherwise have done so, even if the borrower's condition makes it unlikely that the amount will ever be repaid.
In the process of originating, buying, selling and holding loans, a fund may receive and/or pay certain fees. These fees are in addition to the interest payments received and may include facility, closing or upfront fees, commitment fees and commissions. A fund may receive or pay a facility, closing or upfront fee when it buys or sells a loan. A fund may receive a commitment fee throughout the life of the loan or as long as the fund remains invested in the loan (in addition to interest payments) for any unused portion of a committed line of credit. Other fees received by the fund may include prepayment fees, covenant waiver fees, ticking fees and/or modification fees. Legal fees related to the originating, buying, selling and holding loans may also be borne by the fund (including legal fees to assess conformity of a loan investment with 1940 Act provisions).
When engaging in direct lending, if permitted by its investment policies, a fund's performance may depend, in part, on the ability of the fund to originate loans on advantageous terms. A fund may compete with other lenders in originating and purchasing loans. Increased competition for, or a diminished available supply of, qualifying loans could result in lower yields on and/or less advantageous terms for such loans, which could reduce fund performance.
For a Fidelity ® fund that limits the amount of total assets that it will invest in any one issuer or in issuers within the same industry, the fund generally will treat the borrower as the "issuer" of indebtedness held by the fund. In the case of loan participations where a bank or other lending institution serves as financial intermediary between a fund and the borrower, if the participation does not shift to the fund the direct debtor-creditor relationship with the borrower, SEC interpretations require a fund, in appropriate circumstances, to treat both the lending bank or other lending institution and the borrower as "issuers" for these purposes. Treating a financial intermediary as an issuer of indebtedness may restrict a fund's ability to invest in indebtedness related to a single financial intermediary, or a group of intermediaries engaged in the same industry, even if the underlying borrowers represent many different companies and industries.
A fund may choose, at its expense or in conjunction with others, to pursue litigation or otherwise to exercise its rights as a security holder to seek to protect the interests of security holders if it determines this to be in the best interest of the fund's shareholders.
If permitted by its investment policies, a fund may also obtain exposure to the lending activities described above indirectly through its investments in underlying Fidelity funds or other vehicles that may engage in such activities directly.
Lower-Quality Debt Securities. Lower-quality debt securities include all types of debt instruments that have poor protection with respect to the payment of interest and repayment of principal, or may be in default. These securities are often considered to be speculative and involve greater risk of loss or price changes due to changes in the issuer's capacity to pay. The market prices of lower-quality debt securities may fluctuate more than those of higher-quality debt securities and may decline significantly in periods of general economic difficulty, which may follow periods of rising interest rates.
The market for lower-quality debt securities may be thinner and less active than that for higher-quality debt securities, which can adversely affect the prices at which the former are sold. Adverse publicity and changing investor perceptions may affect the liquidity of lower-quality debt securities and the ability of outside pricing services to value lower-quality debt securities.
Because the risk of default is higher for lower-quality debt securities, research and credit analysis are an especially important part of managing securities of this type. Such analysis may focus on relative values based on factors such as interest or dividend coverage, asset coverage, earnings prospects, and the experience and managerial strength of the issuer, in an attempt to identify those issuers of high-yielding securities whose financial condition is adequate to meet future obligations, has improved, or is expected to improve in the future.
A fund may choose, at its expense or in conjunction with others, to pursue litigation or otherwise to exercise its rights as a security holder to seek to protect the interests of security holders if it determines this to be in the best interest of the fund's shareholders.
Low or Negative Yielding Securities. During periods of very low or negative interest rates, a fund may be unable to maintain positive returns. Interest rates in the U.S. and many parts of the world, including Japan and some European countries, are at or near historically low levels. Japan and those European countries have, from time to time, experienced negative interest rates on certain fixed income instruments. Very low or negative interest rates may magnify interest rate risk for the markets as a whole and for the funds. Changing interest rates, including rates that fall below zero, may have unpredictable effects on markets, may result in heightened market volatility and may detract from fund performance to the extent a fund is exposed to such interest rates.
Mortgage Securities are issued by government and non-government entities such as banks, mortgage lenders, or other institutions. A mortgage security is an obligation of the issuer backed by a mortgage or pool of mortgages or a direct interest in an underlying pool of mortgages. Some mortgage securities, such as collateralized mortgage obligations (or "CMOs"), make payments of both principal and interest at a range of specified intervals; others make semi-annual interest payments at a predetermined rate and repay principal at maturity (like a typical bond). Mortgage securities are based on different types of mortgages, including those on commercial real estate or residential properties. Stripped mortgage securities are created when the interest and principal components of a mortgage security are separated and sold as individual securities. In the case of a stripped mortgage security, the holder of the "principal-only" security (PO) receives the principal payments made by the underlying mortgage, while the holder of the "interest-only" security (IO) receives interest payments from the same underlying mortgage.
Fannie Maes and Freddie Macs are pass-through securities issued by Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, respectively. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, which guarantee payment of interest and repayment of principal on Fannie Maes and Freddie Macs, respectively, are federally chartered corporations supervised by the U.S. Government that act as governmental instrumentalities under authority granted by Congress. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are authorized to borrow from the U.S. Treasury to meet their obligations. Fannie Maes and Freddie Macs are not backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. Government.
The value of mortgage securities may change due to shifts in the market's perception of issuers and changes in interest rates. In addition, regulatory or tax changes may adversely affect the mortgage securities market as a whole. Non-government mortgage securities may offer higher yields than those issued by government entities, but also may be subject to greater price changes than government issues. Mortgage securities are subject to prepayment risk, which is the risk that early principal payments made on the underlying mortgages, usually in response to a reduction in interest rates, will result in the return of principal to the investor, causing it to be invested subsequently at a lower current interest rate. Alternatively, in a rising interest rate environment, mortgage security values may be adversely affected when prepayments on underlying mortgages do not occur as anticipated, resulting in the extension of the security's effective maturity and the related increase in interest rate sensitivity of a longer-term instrument. The prices of stripped mortgage securities tend to be more volatile in response to changes in interest rates than those of non-stripped mortgage securities.
A fund may seek to earn additional income by using a trading strategy (commonly known as "mortgage dollar rolls" or "reverse mortgage dollar rolls") that involves selling (or buying) mortgage securities, realizing a gain or loss, and simultaneously agreeing to purchase (or sell) mortgage securities on a later date at a set price. During the period between the sale and repurchase in a mortgage dollar roll transaction, a fund will not be entitled to receive interest and principal payments on the securities sold but will invest the proceeds of the sale in other securities that are permissible investments for the fund. During the period between the purchase and subsequent sale in a reverse mortgage dollar roll transaction, a fund is entitled to interest and principal payments on the securities purchased. Losses may arise due to changes in the value of the securities or if the counterparty does not perform under the terms of the agreement. If the counterparty files for bankruptcy or becomes insolvent, a fund's right to repurchase or sell securities may be limited. This trading strategy may increase interest rate exposure and result in an increased portfolio turnover rate which increases costs and may increase taxable gains.
Precious Metals. Precious metals, such as gold, silver, platinum, and palladium, at times have been subject to substantial price fluctuations over short periods of time and may be affected by unpredictable monetary and political policies such as currency devaluations or revaluations, economic and social conditions within a country, trade imbalances, or trade or currency restrictions between countries. The prices of gold and other precious metals, however, are less subject to local and company-specific factors than securities of individual companies. As a result, precious metals may be more or less volatile in price than securities of companies engaged in precious metals-related businesses. Investments in precious metals can present concerns such as delivery, storage and maintenance, possible illiquidity, and the unavailability of accurate market valuations. Although precious metals can be purchased in any form, including bullion and coins, a Fidelity ® fund intends to purchase only those forms of precious metals that are readily marketable and that can be stored in accordance with custody regulations applicable to mutual funds. A fund may incur higher custody and transaction costs for precious metals than for securities. Also, precious metals investments do not pay income.
For a fund to qualify as a regulated investment company under current federal tax law, gains from selling precious metals may not exceed 10% of the fund's gross income for its taxable year. This tax requirement could cause a fund to hold or sell precious metals or securities when it would not otherwise do so.
Real Estate Investment Trusts (REITs). Equity REITs own real estate properties, while mortgage REITs make construction, development, and long-term mortgage loans. Their value may be affected by changes in the value of the underlying property of the trusts, the creditworthiness of the issuer, property taxes, interest rates, and tax and regulatory requirements, such as those relating to the environment. Both types of trusts are dependent upon management skill, are not diversified, and are subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers, self-liquidation, and the possibility of failing to qualify for tax-free status of income under the Internal Revenue Code and failing to maintain exemption from the 1940 Act.
Repurchase Agreements involve an agreement to purchase a security and to sell that security back to the original seller at an agreed-upon price. The resale price reflects the purchase price plus an agreed-upon incremental amount which is unrelated to the coupon rate or maturity of the purchased security. As protection against the risk that the original seller will not fulfill its obligation, the securities are held in a separate account at a bank, marked-to-market daily, and maintained at a value at least equal to the sale price plus the accrued incremental amount. The value of the security purchased may be more or less than the price at which the counterparty has agreed to purchase the security. In addition, delays or losses could result if the other party to the agreement defaults or becomes insolvent. A fund may be limited in its ability to exercise its right to liquidate assets related to a repurchase agreement with an insolvent counterparty. A Fidelity ® fund may engage in repurchase agreement transactions with parties whose creditworthiness has been reviewed and found satisfactory by the fund's adviser.
Restricted Securities (including Private Placements) are subject to legal restrictions on their sale. Difficulty in selling securities may result in a loss or be costly to a fund. Restricted securities, including private placements of private and public companies, generally can be sold in privately negotiated transactions, pursuant to an exemption from registration under the Securities Act of 1933 (1933 Act), or in a registered public offering. Where registration is required, the holder of a registered security may be obligated to pay all or part of the registration expense and a considerable period may elapse between the time it decides to seek registration and the time it may be permitted to sell a security under an effective registration statement. If, during such a period, adverse market conditions were to develop, the holder might obtain a less favorable price than prevailed when it decided to seek registration of the security.
Reverse Repurchase Agreements. In a reverse repurchase agreement, a fund sells a security to another party, such as a bank or broker-dealer, in return for cash and agrees to repurchase that security at an agreed-upon price and time. A Fidelity ® fund may enter into reverse repurchase agreements with parties whose creditworthiness has been reviewed and found satisfactory by the fund's adviser. Such transactions may increase fluctuations in the market value of a fund's assets and, if applicable, a fund's yield, and may be viewed as a form of leverage. Under SEC requirements, a fund needs to aggregate the amount of indebtedness associated with its reverse repurchase agreements and similar financing transactions with the aggregate amount of any other senior securities representing indebtedness (e.g., borrowings, if applicable) when calculating the fund's asset coverage ratio or treat all such transactions as derivatives transactions.
SEC Rule 18f-4.   In October 2020, the SEC adopted a final rule related to the use of derivatives, short sales, reverse repurchase agreements and certain other transactions by registered investment companies (the "rule"). Subject to certain exceptions, the rule requires the funds to trade derivatives and certain other transactions that create future payment or delivery obligations subject to a value-at-risk (VaR) leverage limit and to certain derivatives risk management program, reporting and board oversight requirements. Generally, these requirements apply to any fund engaging in derivatives transactions unless a fund satisfies a "limited derivatives users" exception, which requires the fund to limit its gross notional derivatives exposure (with certain exceptions) to 10% of its net assets and to adopt derivatives risk management procedures. Under the rule, when a fund trades reverse repurchase agreements or similar financing transactions, it needs to aggregate the amount of indebtedness associated with the reverse repurchase agreements or similar financing transactions with the aggregate amount of any other senior securities representing indebtedness (e.g., borrowings, if applicable) when calculating the fund's asset coverage ratio or treat all such transactions as derivatives transactions. The SEC also provided guidance in connection with the final rule regarding the use of securities lending collateral that may limit securities lending activities. In addition, under the rule, a fund may invest in a security on a when-issued or forward-settling basis, or with a non-standard settlement cycle, and the transaction will be deemed not to involve a senior security (as defined under Section 18(g) of the 1940 Act), provided that (i) the fund intends to physically settle the transaction and (ii) the transaction will settle within 35 days of its trade date (the "Delayed-Settlement Securities Provision"). A fund may otherwise engage in when-issued, forward-settling and non-standard settlement cycle securities transactions that do not meet the conditions of the Delayed-Settlement Securities Provision so long as the fund treats any such transaction as a derivatives transaction for purposes of compliance with the rule. Furthermore, under the rule, a fund will be permitted to enter into an unfunded commitment agreement, and such unfunded commitment agreement will not be subject to the asset coverage requirements under the 1940 Act, if the fund reasonably believes, at the time it enters into such agreement, that it will have sufficient cash and cash equivalents to meet its obligations with respect to all such agreements as they come due. These requirements may limit the ability of the funds to use derivatives, short sales, reverse repurchase agreements and similar financing transactions, and the other relevant transactions as part of its investment strategies. These requirements also may increase the cost of the fund's investments and cost of doing business, which could adversely affect investors.
Securities Lending. A Fidelity ® fund may lend securities to parties such as broker-dealers or other institutions, including an affiliate, National Financial Services LLC (NFS). Securities lending allows a fund to retain ownership of the securities loaned and, at the same time, earn additional income. The borrower provides the fund with collateral in an amount at least equal to the value of the securities loaned. The fund seeks to maintain the ability to obtain the right to vote or consent on proxy proposals involving material events affecting securities loaned. If the borrower defaults on its obligation to return the securities loaned because of insolvency or other reasons, a fund could experience delays and costs in recovering the securities loaned or in gaining access to the collateral. These delays and costs could be greater for foreign securities. If a fund is not able to recover the securities loaned, the fund may sell the collateral and purchase a replacement investment in the market. The value of the collateral could decrease below the value of the replacement investment by the time the replacement investment is purchased. For a Fidelity ® fund, loans will be made only to parties deemed by the fund's adviser to be in good standing and when, in the adviser's judgment, the income earned would justify the risks.
The Fidelity ® funds have retained agents, including NFS, an affiliate of the funds, to act as securities lending agent. If NFS acts as securities lending agent for a fund, it is subject to the overall supervision of the fund's adviser, and NFS will administer the lending program in accordance with guidelines approved by the fund's Trustees.
Cash received as collateral through loan transactions may be invested in other eligible securities, including shares of a money market fund. Investing this cash subjects that investment, as well as the securities loaned, to market appreciation or depreciation.
Securities of Other Investment Companies , including shares of closed-end investment companies (which include business development companies (BDCs)), unit investment trusts, and open-end investment companies, represent interests in professionally managed portfolios that may invest in any type of instrument. Investing in other investment companies involves substantially the same risks as investing directly in the underlying instruments, but may involve additional expenses at the underlying investment company-level, such as portfolio management fees and operating expenses. Fees and expenses incurred indirectly by a fund as a result of its investment in shares of one or more other investment companies generally are referred to as "acquired fund fees and expenses" and may appear as a separate line item in a fund's prospectus fee table. For certain investment companies, such as BDCs, these expenses may be significant. Certain types of investment companies, such as closed-end investment companies, issue a fixed number of shares that trade on a stock exchange or over-the-counter at a premium or a discount to their NAV. Others are continuously offered at NAV, but may also be traded in the secondary market.
The securities of closed-end funds may be leveraged. As a result, a fund may be indirectly exposed to leverage through an investment in such securities. An investment in securities of closed-end funds that use leverage may expose a fund to higher volatility in the market value of such securities and the possibility that the fund's long-term returns on such securities will be diminished.
A fund's ability to invest in securities of other investment companies may be limited by federal securities laws. To the extent a fund acquires securities issued by unaffiliated investment companies, the Adviser's access to information regarding such underlying fund's portfolio may be limited and subject to such fund's policies regarding disclosure of fund holdings.
Short Sales. Stocks underlying a fund's convertible security holdings can be sold short. For example, if a fund's adviser anticipates a decline in the price of the stock underlying a convertible security held by the fund, it may sell the stock short. If the stock price subsequently declines, the proceeds of the short sale could be expected to offset all or a portion of the effect of the stock's decline on the value of the convertible security. Fidelity ® funds that employ this strategy generally intend to hedge no more than 15% of total assets with short sales on equity securities underlying convertible security holdings under normal circumstances. A fund will incur transaction costs, including interest expenses, in connection with opening, maintaining, and closing short sales.
Special Purpose Acquisition Companies ("SPACs"). A fund may invest in stock, warrants, and other securities of SPACs or similar special purpose entities that pool money to seek potential acquisition opportunities. SPACs are collective investment structures formed to raise money in an initial public offering for the purpose of merging with or acquiring one or more operating companies (the "de-SPAC Transaction"). Until an acquisition is completed, a SPAC generally invests its assets in US government securities, money market securities and cash. In connection with a de-SPAC Transaction, the SPAC may complete a PIPE (private investment in public equity) offering with certain investors. A fund may enter into a contingent commitment with a SPAC to purchase PIPE shares if and when the SPAC completes its de-SPAC Transaction.
Because SPACs do not have an operating history or ongoing business other than seeking acquisitions, the value of their securities is particularly dependent on the ability of the SPAC's management to identify and complete a profitable acquisition. Some SPACs may pursue acquisitions only within certain industries or regions, which may increase the volatility of their prices. An investment in a SPAC is subject to a variety of risks, including that (i) an attractive acquisition or merger target may not be identified at all and the SPAC will be required to return any remaining monies to shareholders; (ii) an acquisition or merger once effected may prove unsuccessful and an investment in the SPAC may lose value; (iii) the values of investments in SPACs may be highly volatile and may depreciate significantly over time; (iv) no or only a thinly traded market for shares of or interests in a SPAC may develop, leaving a fund unable to sell its interest in a SPAC or to sell its interest only at a price below what the fund believes is the SPAC interest's intrinsic value; (v) any proposed merger or acquisition may be unable to obtain the requisite approval, if any, of shareholders; (vi) an investment in a SPAC may be diluted by additional later offerings of interests in the SPAC or by other investors exercising existing rights to purchase shares of the SPAC; (vii) the warrants or other rights with respect to the SPAC held by a fund may expire worthless or may be repurchased or retired by the SPAC at an unfavorable price; (viii) a fund may be delayed in receiving any redemption or liquidation proceeds from a SPAC to which it is entitled; and (ix) a significant portion of the monies raised by the SPAC for the purpose of identifying and effecting an acquisition or merger may be expended during the search for a target transaction.
Purchased PIPE shares will be restricted from trading until the registration statement for the shares is declared effective. Upon registration, the shares can be freely sold, but only pursuant to an effective registration statement or other exemption from registration. The securities issued by a SPAC, which are typically traded either in the over-the-counter market or on an exchange, may be considered illiquid, more difficult to value, and/or be subject to restrictions on resale.
Stripped Securities are the separate income or principal components of a debt security. The risks associated with stripped securities are similar to those of other debt securities, although stripped securities may be more volatile, and the value of certain types of stripped securities may move in the same direction as interest rates. U.S. Treasury securities that have been stripped by a Federal Reserve Bank are obligations issued by the U.S. Treasury. 
Privately stripped government securities are created when a dealer deposits a U.S. Treasury security or other U.S. Government security with a custodian for safekeeping. The custodian issues separate receipts for the coupon payments and the principal payment, which the dealer then sells.
Structured Securities (also called "structured notes") are derivative debt securities, the interest rate on or principal of which is determined by an unrelated indicator. The value of the interest rate on and/or the principal of structured securities is determined by reference to changes in the value of a reference instrument (e.g., a security or other financial instrument, asset, currency, interest rate, commodity, or index) or the relative change in two or more reference instruments. A structured security may be positively, negatively, or both positively and negatively indexed; that is, its value or interest rate may increase or decrease if the value of the reference instrument increases. Similarly, its value or interest rate may increase or decrease if the value of the reference instrument decreases. Further, the change in the principal amount payable with respect to, or the interest rate of, a structured security may be calculated as a multiple of the percentage change (positive or negative) in the value of the underlying reference instrument(s); therefore, the value of such structured security may be very volatile. Structured securities may entail a greater degree of market risk than other types of debt securities because the investor bears the risk of the reference instrument. Structured securities may also be more volatile, less liquid, and more difficult to accurately price than less complex securities or more traditional debt securities. In addition, because structured securities generally are traded over-the-counter, structured securities are subject to the creditworthiness of the counterparty of the structured security, and their values may decline substantially if the counterparty's creditworthiness deteriorates.
Commodity-linked notes are a type of structured note. Commodity-linked notes are privately negotiated structured debt securities indexed to the return of an index such as the Bloomberg Commodity Index, which is representative of the commodities market. They are available from a limited number of approved counterparties, and all invested amounts are exposed to the dealer's credit risk. Commodity-linked notes may be leveraged. For example, if a fund invests $100 in a three-times leveraged commodity-linked note, it will exchange $100 principal with the dealer to obtain $300 exposure to the commodities market because the value of the note will change by a magnitude of three for every percentage change (positive or negative) in the value of the underlying index. This means a $100 note may be worth $70 if the commodity index decreased by 10 percent.
Temporary Defensive Policies. Each of Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85% reserves the right to invest without limitation in preferred stocks and investment-grade debt instruments for temporary, defensive purposes.
Transfer Agent Bank Accounts. Proceeds from shareholder purchases of a Fidelity ® fund may pass through a series of demand deposit bank accounts before being held at the fund's custodian. Redemption proceeds may pass from the custodian to the shareholder through a similar series of bank accounts.
If a bank account is registered to the transfer agent or an affiliate, who acts as an agent for the funds when opening, closing, and conducting business in the bank account, the transfer agent or an affiliate may invest overnight balances in the account in repurchase agreements. Any balances that are not invested in repurchase agreements remain in the bank account overnight. Any risks associated with such an account are investment risks of the funds. A fund faces the risk of loss of these balances if the bank becomes insolvent.
Variable and Floating Rate Securities provide for periodic adjustments in the interest rate paid on the security. Variable rate securities provide for a specified periodic adjustment in the interest rate, while floating rate securities have interest rates that change whenever there is a change in a designated benchmark rate or the issuer's credit quality, sometimes subject to a cap or floor on such rate. Some variable or floating rate securities are structured with put features that permit holders to demand payment of the unpaid principal balance plus accrued interest from the issuers or certain financial intermediaries. For purposes of determining the maximum maturity of a variable or floating rate security, a fund's adviser may take into account normal settlement periods.
In addition to other interbank offered rates (IBORs), the most common benchmark rate for floating rate securities is LIBOR, which is the rate of interest offered on short-term interbank deposits, as determined by trading between major international banks. After the global financial crisis, regulators globally determined that existing interest rate benchmarks should be reformed based on concerns that LIBOR and other IBORs were susceptible to manipulation. Replacement rates that have been identified include the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR, which is intended to replace U.S. dollar LIBOR and measures the cost of U.S. dollar overnight borrowings) and the Sterling Overnight Index Average rate (SONIA, which is intended to replace pound sterling LIBOR and measures the overnight interest rate paid by banks in the sterling market). In March 2021, the United Kingdom's Financial Conduct Authority and ICE Benchmark Authority formally announced the dates after which the LIBORs will no longer be representative and subsequently cease publication. Certain LIBOR settings will cease publication after the end of 2021. However, the publication of certain other LIBOR settings will continue through at least mid-2023. While various regulators and industry bodies are working globally on transitioning to alternative rates, there remains uncertainty regarding the future utilization of the IBORs and the transition to, and the nature of, replacement rates. As such, the effect of a transition away from the IBORs on a fund and the financial instruments in which it invests cannot yet be determined, and may depend on factors that include, but are not limited to: (i) existing fallback or termination provisions in individual contracts; (ii) the effect of new legislation relating to the discontinuation of LIBOR and the use of replacement rates, and (iii) whether, how, and when industry participants develop and adopt new reference rates and fallbacks for both legacy and new products and instruments. Such transition may result in a reduction in the value of IBOR-based instruments held by a fund, a reduction in the effectiveness of certain hedging transactions and increased illiquidity and volatility in markets that currently rely on an IBOR to determine interest rates, any of which could adversely impact the fund's performance.
Warrants. Warrants are instruments which entitle the holder to buy an equity security at a specific price for a specific period of time. Changes in the value of a warrant do not necessarily correspond to changes in the value of its underlying security. The price of a warrant may be more volatile than the price of its underlying security, and a warrant may offer greater potential for capital appreciation as well as capital loss.
Warrants do not entitle a holder to dividends or voting rights with respect to the underlying security and do not represent any rights in the assets of the issuing company. A warrant ceases to have value if it is not exercised prior to its expiration date. These factors can make warrants more speculative than other types of investments.
When-Issued and Forward Purchase or Sale Transactions involve a commitment to purchase or sell specific securities at a predetermined price or yield in which payment and delivery take place after the customary settlement period for that type of security. Typically, no interest accrues to the purchaser until the security is delivered.
When purchasing securities pursuant to one of these transactions, the purchaser assumes the rights and risks of ownership, including the risks of price and yield fluctuations and the risk that the security will not be issued as anticipated. Because payment for the securities is not required until the delivery date, these risks are in addition to the risks associated with a fund's investments. If a fund remains substantially fully invested at a time when a purchase is outstanding, the purchases may result in a form of leverage. When a fund has sold a security pursuant to one of these transactions, the fund does not participate in further gains or losses with respect to the security. If the other party to a delayed-delivery transaction fails to deliver or pay for the securities, a fund could miss a favorable price or yield opportunity or suffer a loss.
A fund may renegotiate a when-issued or forward transaction and may sell the underlying securities before delivery, which may result in capital gains or losses for the fund.
A fund may also engage in purchases or sales of "to be announced" or "TBA" securities, which usually are transactions in which a fund buys or sells mortgage-backed securities on a forward commitment basis. A TBA transaction typically does not designate the actual security to be delivered and only includes an approximate principal amount. TBA trades can be used by a fund for investment purposes in order to gain exposure to certain securities, or for hedging purposes to adjust the risk exposure of a fund portfolio without having to restructure a portfolio. Purchases and sales of TBA securities involve risks similar to those discussed above for other when-issued and forward purchase and sale transactions. In addition, when a fund sells TBA securities, it incurs risks similar to those incurred in short sales. For example, when a fund sells TBA securities without owning or having the right to obtain the deliverable securities, it incurs a risk of loss because it could have to purchase the securities at a price that is higher than the price at which it sold them. Also, a fund may be unable to purchase the deliverable securities if the corresponding market is illiquid.
Zero Coupon Bonds do not make interest payments; instead, they are sold at a discount from their face value and are redeemed at face value when they mature. Because zero coupon bonds do not pay current income, their prices can be more volatile than other types of fixed-income securities when interest rates change. In calculating a fund's dividend, a portion of the difference between a zero coupon bond's purchase price and its face value is considered income.
In addition to the investment policies and limitations discussed above, a fund is subject to the additional operational risk discussed below.
Considerations Regarding Cybersecurity. With the increased use of technologies such as the Internet to conduct business, a fund's service providers are susceptible to operational, information security and related risks. In general, cyber incidents can result from deliberate attacks or unintentional events and may arise from external or internal sources. Cyber attacks include, but are not limited to, gaining unauthorized access to digital systems (e.g., through "hacking" or malicious software coding) for purposes of misappropriating assets or sensitive information; corrupting data, equipment or systems; or causing operational disruption. Cyber attacks may also be carried out in a manner that does not require gaining unauthorized access, such as causing denial-of-service attacks on websites (i.e., efforts to make network services unavailable to intended users). Cyber incidents affecting a fund's manager, any sub-adviser and other service providers (including, but not limited to, fund accountants, custodians, transfer agents and financial intermediaries) have the ability to cause disruptions and impact business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses, interference with a fund's ability to calculate its NAV, impediments to trading, the inability of fund shareholders to transact business, destruction to equipment and systems, violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs. Similar adverse consequences could result from cyber incidents affecting issuers of securities in which a fund invests, counterparties with which a fund engages in transactions, governmental and other regulatory authorities, exchange and other financial market operators, banks, brokers, dealers, insurance companies and other financial institutions (including financial intermediaries and service providers for fund shareholders) and other parties. In addition, substantial costs may be incurred in order to prevent any cyber incidents in the future.
While a fund's service providers have established business continuity plans in the event of, and risk management systems to prevent, such cyber incidents, there are inherent limitations in such plans and systems including the possibility that certain risks have not been identified. Furthermore, a fund cannot control the cyber security plans and systems put in place by its service providers or any other third parties whose operations may affect a fund or its shareholders. A fund and its shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.
SPECIAL GEOGRAPHIC CONSIDERATIONS
Emerging Markets. Emerging markets include countries that have an emerging stock market as defined by MSCI, countries or markets with low- to middle-income economies as classified by the World Bank, and other countries or markets that the Adviser identifies as having similar emerging markets characteristics. Emerging markets tend to have relatively low gross national product per capita compared to the world's major economies and may have the potential for rapid economic growth.
Investments in companies domiciled in emerging market countries may be subject to potentially higher risks than investments in developed countries. These risks include: (i) less social, political, and economic stability; (ii) greater illiquidity and price volatility due to smaller or limited local capital markets for such securities, or low or non-existent trading volumes; (iii) foreign exchanges and broker-dealers may be subject to less oversight and regulation by local authorities; (iv) local governments may decide to seize or confiscate securities held by foreign investors, restrict an investor's ability to sell or redeem securities, decide to suspend or limit an issuer's ability to make dividend or interest payments; and/or may limit or entirely restrict repatriation of invested capital, profits, and dividends; (v) capital gains may be subject to local taxation, including on a retroactive basis; (vi) issuers facing restrictions on dollar or euro payments imposed by local governments may attempt to make dividend or interest payments to foreign investors in the local currency; (vii) investors may experience difficulty in enforcing legal claims related to the securities, shareholder claims common in the United States may not exist in emerging markets, and/or local judges may favor the interests of the issuer over those of foreign investors; (viii) U.S. authorities may be unable to investigate, bring, or enforce actions against non-U.S. companies and non-U.S. persons; (ix) bankruptcy judgments may only be permitted to be paid in the local currency; (x) limited public information regarding the issuer may result in greater difficulty in determining market valuations of the securities; and (xi) infrequent financial reporting, substandard disclosure, and differences in financial reporting, audit and accounting requirements and standards may make it difficult to ascertain the financial health of an issuer. In addition, unlike developed countries, many emerging countries' economic growth highly depends on exports and inflows of external capital, making them more vulnerable to the downturns of the world economy. The enduring low growth in the global economy has weakened the global demand for emerging market exports and tightened international credit supplies, highlighting the sensitivity of emerging economies to the performance of their trading partners. Developing countries may also face disproportionately large exposure to the negative effects of climate change, due to both geography and a lack of access to technology to adapt to its effects, which could include increased frequency and severity of natural disasters and extreme weather events such as droughts, rising sea levels, decreased crop yields, and increased spread of disease, all of which could harm performance of affected economies. Given the particular vulnerability of emerging market countries to the effects of climate change, disruptions in international efforts to address climate-related issues may have a disproportionate impact on developing countries.
Many emerging market countries suffer from uncertainty and corruption in their legal frameworks. Legislation may be difficult to interpret or laws may be too new to provide any precedential value. Laws regarding foreign investment and private property may be weak, not enforced consistently, or non-existent. Sudden changes in governments or the transition of regimes may result in policies that are less favorable to investors such as the imposition of price controls or policies designed to expropriate or nationalize "sovereign" assets. Certain emerging market countries in the past have expropriated large amounts of private property, in many cases with little or no compensation, and there can be no assurance that such expropriation will not occur in the future.
The United States, other nations, or other governmental entities (including supranational entities) could impose sanctions on a country that limits or restricts foreign investment, the movement of assets or other economic activity. In addition, an imposition of sanctions upon certain issuers in a country could have a materially adverse effect on the value of such companies' securities, delay a fund's ability to exercise certain rights as security holder, and/or impair a fund's ability to meet its investment objectives. A fund may be prohibited from investing in securities issued by companies subject to such sanctions and may be required to freeze its existing investments in those companies, prohibiting the fund from selling or otherwise transacting in these investments. Such sanctions, or other intergovernmental actions that may be taken in the future, may result in the devaluation of the country's currency, a downgrade in the country's credit rating, and/or a decline in the value and liquidity of impacted company stocks.
Many emerging market countries in which a fund may invest lack the social, political, and economic stability characteristic exhibited by developed countries. Political instability among emerging market countries can be common and may be caused by an uneven distribution of wealth, governmental corruption, social unrest, labor strikes, civil wars, and religious oppression. Economic instability in emerging market countries may take the form of: (i) high interest rates; (ii) high levels of inflation, including hyperinflation; (iii) high levels of unemployment or underemployment; (iv) changes in government economic and tax policies, including confiscatory taxation (or taxes on foreign investments); and (v) imposition of trade barriers.
Currencies of emerging market countries are subject to significantly greater risks than currencies of developed countries. Some emerging market currencies may not be internationally traded or may be subject to strict controls by local governments, resulting in undervalued or overvalued currencies. Some emerging market countries have experienced balance of payment deficits and shortages in foreign exchange reserves, which has resulted in some governments restricting currency conversions. Future restrictive exchange controls could prevent or restrict a company's ability to make dividend or interest payments in the original currency of the obligation (usually U.S. dollars). In addition, even though the currencies of some emerging market countries may be convertible into U.S. dollars, the conversion rates may be artificial relative to their actual market values.
Governments of many emerging market countries have become overly reliant on the international capital markets and other forms of foreign credit to finance large public spending programs that cause huge budget deficits. Often, interest payments have become too overwhelming for these governments to meet, as these payments may represent a large percentage of a country's total GDP. Accordingly, these foreign obligations have become the subject of political debate within emerging market countries, which has resulted in internal pressure for such governments to not make payments to foreign creditors, but instead to use these funds for social programs. As a result of either an inability to pay or submission to political pressure, the governments sought to restructure their loan and/or bond obligations, have declared a temporary suspension of interest payments, or defaulted (in part or full) on their outstanding debt obligations. These events have adversely affected the values of securities issued by the governments and corporations domiciled in these emerging market countries and have negatively affected not only their cost of borrowing, but their ability to borrow in the future as well. Emerging markets have also benefited from continued monetary policies adopted by the central banks of developed countries. After a period of continuously raising interest rates, the U.S. Federal Reserve and central banks in other developed countries have reduced interest rates to historically low levels. To the extent the Federal Reserve Board maintains near zero rates, emerging market economies may benefit. 
In addition to their continued reliance on international capital markets, many emerging economies are also highly dependent on international trade and exports, including exports of oil and other commodities. As a result, these economies are particularly vulnerable to downturns of the world economy. In recent years, emerging market economies have been subject to tightened international credit supplies and weakened global demand for their exports and, as a result, certain of these economies faced significant difficulties and some economies face recessionary concerns. Over the last decade, emerging market countries, and companies domiciled in such countries, have acquired significant debt levels. Any increase in U.S. interest rates could restrict the access to relatively inexpensive credit supplies and jeopardize the ability of emerging market countries to pay their respective debt service obligations. Although certain emerging market economies have shown signs of growth and recovery, continued growth is dependent on the uncertain economic outlook of China, Japan, the European Union, and the United States. The reduced demand for exports and lack of available capital for investment resulting from the European debt crisis, a slowdown in China, the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic, and persistent low growth in the global economy may inhibit growth for emerging market countries.
PORTFOLIO TRANSACTIONS
Orders for the purchase or sale of portfolio securities are placed on behalf of a fund by Fidelity Management & Research Company LLC (FMR or the Adviser) pursuant to authority contained in the management contract.  
To the extent that the Adviser grants investment management authority to a sub-adviser (see the section entitled "Management Contracts"), that sub-adviser is authorized to provide the services described in the respective sub-advisory agreement, and in accordance with the policies described in this section. Furthermore, the sub-adviser's trading and associated policies, which may differ from the Adviser's policies, may apply to that fund, subject to applicable law.
The Adviser or a sub-adviser may be responsible for the placement of portfolio securities transactions for other investment companies and investment accounts for which it has or its affiliates have investment discretion.
A fund will not incur any commissions or sales charges when it invests in shares of mutual funds (including any underlying Central funds), but it may incur such costs when it invests directly in other types of securities.
Purchases and sales of equity securities on a securities exchange or OTC are effected through brokers who receive compensation for their services. Generally, compensation relating to securities traded on foreign exchanges will be higher than compensation relating to securities traded on U.S. exchanges and may not be subject to negotiation. Compensation may also be paid in connection with principal transactions (in both OTC securities and securities listed on an exchange) and agency OTC transactions executed with an electronic communications network (ECN) or an alternative trading system. Equity securities may be purchased from underwriters at prices that include underwriting fees.
Purchases and sales of fixed-income securities are generally made with an issuer or a primary market-maker acting as principal. Although there is no stated brokerage commission paid by a fund for any fixed-income security, the price paid by a fund to an underwriter includes the disclosed underwriting fee and prices in secondary trades usually include an undisclosed dealer commission or markup reflecting the spread between the bid and ask prices of the fixed-income security. New issues of equity and fixed-income securities may also be purchased in underwritten fixed price offerings. 
The Trustees of each fund periodically review the Adviser's performance of its responsibilities in connection with the placement of portfolio securities transactions on behalf of each fund. The Trustees also review the compensation paid by each fund over representative periods of time to determine if it was reasonable in relation to the benefits to the fund.
The Selection of Securities Brokers and Dealers
The Adviser or its affiliates generally have authority to select brokers (whether acting as a broker or a dealer) to place or execute a fund's portfolio securities transactions. In selecting brokers, including affiliates of the Adviser, to execute a fund's portfolio securities transactions, the Adviser or its affiliates consider the factors they deem relevant in the context of a particular trade and in regard to the Adviser's or its affiliates' overall responsibilities with respect to the fund and other investment accounts, including any instructions from the fund's portfolio manager, which may emphasize, for example, speed of execution over other factors. Based on the factors considered, the Adviser or its affiliates may choose to execute an order using ECNs, including broker-sponsored algorithms, internal crossing, or by verbally working an order with one or more brokers. Other possibly relevant factors include, but are not limited to, the following: price; costs; the size, nature and type of the order; the speed of execution; financial condition and reputation of the broker; broker specific considerations (e.g., not all brokers are able to execute all types of trades); broker willingness to commit capital; the nature and characteristics of the markets in which the security is traded; the trader's assessment of whether and how closely the broker likely will follow the trader's instructions to the broker; confidentiality and the potential for information leakage; the nature or existence of post-trade clearing, settlement, custody and currency convertibility mechanisms; and the provision of additional brokerage and research products and services, if applicable and where allowed by law.
In seeking best execution for portfolio securities transactions, the Adviser or its affiliates may from time to time select a broker that uses a trading method, including algorithmic trading, for which the broker charges a higher commission than its lowest available commission rate. The Adviser or its affiliates also may select a broker that charges more than the lowest commission rate available from another broker. Occasionally the Adviser or its affiliates execute an entire securities transaction with a broker and allocate all or a portion of the transaction and/or related commissions to a second broker where a client does not permit trading with an affiliate of the Adviser or in other limited situations. In those situations, the commission rate paid to the second broker may be higher than the commission rate paid to the executing broker. For futures transactions, the selection of a futures commission merchant is generally based on the overall quality of execution and other services provided by the futures commission merchant. The Adviser or its affiliates execute futures transactions verbally and electronically.
The Acquisition of Brokerage and Research Products and Services
Brokers (who are not affiliates of the Adviser) that execute transactions for a fund managed outside of the European Union may receive higher compensation from the fund than other brokers might have charged the fund, in recognition of the value of the brokerage or research products and services they provide to the Adviser or its affiliates.
Research Products and Services. These products and services may include, when permissible under applicable law, but are not limited to: economic, industry, company, municipal, sovereign (U.S. and non-U.S.), legal, or political research reports; market color; company meeting facilitation; compilation of securities prices, earnings, dividends and similar data; quotation services, data, information and other services; analytical computer software and services; and investment recommendations. In addition to receiving brokerage and research products and services via written reports and computer-delivered services, such reports may also be provided by telephone and in video and in-person meetings with securities analysts, corporate and industry spokespersons, economists, academicians and government representatives and others with relevant professional expertise. The Adviser or its affiliates may request that a broker provide a specific proprietary or third-party product or service. Some of these brokerage and research products and services supplement the Adviser's or its affiliates' own research activities in providing investment advice to the funds.
Execution Services. In addition, when permissible under applicable law, brokerage and research products and services include those that assist in the execution, clearing, and settlement of securities transactions, as well as other incidental functions (including, but not limited to, communication services related to trade execution, order routing and algorithmic trading, post-trade matching, exchange of messages among brokers or dealers, custodians and institutions, and the use of electronic confirmation and affirmation of institutional trades).
Mixed-Use Products and Services. Although the Adviser or its affiliates do not use fund commissions to pay for products or services that do not qualify as brokerage and research products and services or eligible external research under MiFID II and FCA regulations (as defined below), where allowed by applicable law, they, at times, will use commission dollars to obtain certain products or services that are not used exclusively in the Adviser's or its affiliates' investment decision-making process (mixed-use products or services). In those circumstances, the Adviser or its affiliates will make a good faith judgment to evaluate the various benefits and uses to which they intend to put the mixed-use product or service, and will pay for that portion of the mixed-use product or service that does not qualify as brokerage and research products and services or eligible external research with their own resources (referred to as "hard dollars").
Benefit to the Adviser. The Adviser's or its affiliates' expenses likely would be increased if they attempted to generate these additional brokerage and research products and services through their own efforts, or if they paid for these brokerage and research products or services with their own resources. Therefore, an economic incentive exists for the Adviser or its affiliates to select or recommend a broker-dealer based on its interest in receiving the brokerage and research products and services, rather than on the Adviser's or its affiliates' funds interest in receiving most favorable execution. The Adviser and its affiliates manage the receipt of brokerage and research products and services and the potential for conflicts through its Commission Uses Program. The Commission Uses Program effectively "unbundles" commissions paid to brokers who provide brokerage and research products and services, i.e., commissions consist of an execution commission, which covers the execution of the trade (including clearance and settlement), and a research charge, which is used to cover brokerage and research products and services. Those brokers have client commission arrangements (each a CCA) in place with the Adviser and its affiliates (each of those brokers referred to as CCA brokers). In selecting brokers for executing transactions on behalf of the fund, the trading desks through which the Adviser or its affiliates may execute trades are instructed to execute portfolio transactions on behalf of the funds based on the quality of execution without any consideration of brokerage and research products and services the CCA broker provides. Commissions paid to a CCA broker include both an execution commission and a research charge, and while the CCA broker receives the entire commission, it retains the execution commission and either credits or transmits the research portion (also known as "soft dollars") to a CCA pool maintained by each CCA broker. Soft dollar credits (credits) accumulated in CCA pools are used to pay research expenses. In some cases, the Adviser or its affiliates may request that a broker that is not a party to any particular transaction provide a specific proprietary or third-party product or service, which would be paid with credits from the CCA pool. The administration of brokerage and research products and services is managed separately from the trading desks, and traders have no responsibility for administering the research program, including the payment for research. The Adviser or its affiliates, at times, use a third-party aggregator to facilitate payments to research providers. Where an aggregator is involved, the aggregator would maintain credits in an account that is segregated from the aggregator's proprietary assets and the assets of its other clients and use those credits to pay research providers as instructed by the Adviser or its affiliates. Furthermore, where permissible under applicable law, certain of the brokerage and research products and services that the Adviser or its affiliates receive are furnished by brokers on their own initiative, either in connection with a particular transaction or as part of their overall services. Some of these brokerage and research products or services may be provided at no additional cost to the Adviser or its affiliates or have no explicit cost associated with them. In addition, the Adviser or its affiliates may request that a broker provide a specific proprietary or third-party product or service, certain of which third-party products or services may be provided by a broker that is not a party to a particular transaction and is not connected with the transacting broker's overall services.
The Adviser's Decision-Making Process. In connection with the allocation of fund brokerage, the Adviser or its affiliates make a good faith determination that the compensation paid to brokers and dealers is reasonable in relation to the value of the brokerage and/or research products and services provided to the Adviser or its affiliates, viewed in terms of the particular transaction for a fund or the Adviser's or its affiliates' overall responsibilities to that fund or other investment companies and investment accounts for which the Adviser or its affiliates have investment discretion; however, each brokerage and research product or service received in connection with a fund's brokerage does not benefit all funds and certain funds will receive the benefit of the brokerage and research product or services obtained with other funds' commissions. As required under applicable laws or fund policy, commissions generated by certain funds may only be used to obtain certain brokerage and research products and services. As a result, certain funds will pay more proportionately of certain types of brokerage and research products and services than others, while the overall amount of brokerage and research products and services paid by each fund continues to be allocated equitably. While the Adviser or its affiliates take into account the brokerage and/or research products and services provided by a broker or dealer in determining whether compensation paid is reasonable, neither the Adviser, its affiliates, nor the funds incur an obligation to any broker, dealer, or third party to pay for any brokerage and research product or service (or portion thereof) by generating a specific amount of compensation or otherwise. Typically, for funds managed by the Adviser or its affiliates outside of the European Union or the United Kingdom, these brokerage and research products and services assist the Adviser or its affiliates in terms of their overall investment responsibilities to a fund or any other investment companies and investment accounts for which the Adviser or its affiliates may have investment discretion. Certain funds or investment accounts may use brokerage commissions to acquire brokerage and research products and services that also benefit other funds or accounts managed by the Adviser or its affiliates, and not every fund or investment account uses the brokerage and research products and services that may have been acquired through that fund's commissions.
Research Contracts. The Adviser or its affiliates have arrangements with certain third-party research providers and brokers through whom the Adviser or its affiliates effect fund trades, whereby the Adviser or its affiliates may pay with fund commissions or hard dollars for all or a portion of the cost of research products and services purchased from such research providers or brokers. If hard dollar payments are used, the Adviser or its affiliates, at times, will cause a fund to pay more for execution than the lowest commission rate available from the broker providing research products and services to the Adviser or its affiliates, or that may be available from another broker. The Adviser's or its affiliates' determination to pay for research products and services separately is wholly voluntary on the Adviser's or its affiliates' part and may be extended to additional brokers or discontinued with any broker participating in this arrangement.
Funds Managed within the European Union. The Adviser and its affiliates have established policies and procedures relating to brokerage commission uses in compliance with the revised Markets in Financial Instruments Directive in the European Union, commonly referred to as "MiFID II", as implemented in the United Kingdom through the Conduct of Business Sourcebook Rules of the UK Financial Conduct Authority (the FCA), where applicable.
Funds, or portions thereof, that are managed within the United Kingdom by FMR Investment Management (UK) Limited (FMR UK) use research payment accounts (RPAs) to cover costs associated with equity and high income external research that is consumed by those funds or investment accounts in accordance with MiFID II and FCA regulations. With RPAs, funds pay for external research through a separate research charge that is generally assessed and collected alongside the execution commission 1 . For funds that use an RPA, FMR UK establishes a research budget. The budget is set by first grouping funds or investment accounts by strategy (e.g., asset allocation, blend, growth, etc.), and then determining what external research is consumed to support the strategies and portfolio management services provided within the European Union or the United Kingdom. In this regard, research budgets are set by research needs and are not otherwise linked to the volume or value of transactions executed on behalf of the fund or investment account. For funds where portions are managed both within and outside of the United Kingdom, external research may be paid using both a CCA and an RPA. Determinations of what is eligible research and how costs are allocated are made in accordance with the Adviser's and its affiliates' policies and procedures. Costs for research consumed by funds that use an RPA will be allocated among the funds or investment accounts within defined strategies pro rata based on the assets under management for each fund or investment account. While the research charge paid on behalf of any one fund that uses an RPA varies over time, the overall research charge determined at the fund level on an annual basis will not be exceeded.
FMR UK is responsible for managing the RPA and may delegate its administration to a third-party administrator for the facilitation of the purchase of external research and payments to research providers. RPA assets will be maintained in accounts at a third-party depository institution, held in the name of FMR UK. FMR UK provides on request, a summary of: (i) the providers paid from the RPA; (ii) the total amount they were paid over a defined period; (iii) the benefits and services received by FMR UK; and (iv) how the total amount spent from the RPA compares to the research budget set for that period, noting any rebate or carryover if residual funds remain in the RPA.
Impacted funds, like those funds that participate in CCA pools, at times, will make payments to a broker that include both an execution commission and a research charge, but unlike CCAs (for which research charges may be retained by the CCA broker and credited to the CCA, as described above), the broker will receive separate payments for the execution commission and the research charge and will promptly remit the research charge to the RPA. Assets in the RPA are used to satisfy external research costs consumed by the funds.
If the costs of paying for external research exceed the amount initially agreed in relation to funds in a given strategy, the Adviser or its affiliates may continue to charge those funds or investment accounts beyond the initially agreed amount in accordance with MiFID II, continue to acquire external research for the funds or investment accounts using its own resources, or cease to purchase external research for those funds or investment accounts until the next annual research budget. If assets for specific funds remain in the RPA at the end of a period, they may be rolled over to the next period to offset next year's research charges for those funds or rebated to those funds.
Funds managed by FMR UK that trade only fixed income securities will not participate in RPAs because fixed income securities trade based on spreads rather than commissions, and thus unbundling the execution commission and research charge is impractical. Therefore, FMR UK and its affiliates have established policies and procedures to ensure that external research that is paid for through RPAs is not made available to FMR UK portfolio managers that manage fixed income funds or investment accounts in any manner inconsistent with MiFID II and FCA regulations.
1 The staff of the SEC addressed concerns that reliance on an RPA mechanism to pay for research would be permissible under Section 28(e) of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 by indicating that they would not recommend enforcement against investment advisers who used an RPA to pay for research and brokerage products and services so long as certain conditions were met. Therefore, references to "research charges" as part of the RPA mechanism to satisfy MiFID II requirements can be considered "commissions" for Section 28(e) purposes.
Commission Recapture
From time to time, the Adviser or its affiliates engages in brokerage transactions with brokers (who are not affiliates of the Adviser) who have entered into arrangements with the Adviser or its affiliates under which the broker will, at times, rebate a portion of the compensation paid by a fund (commission recapture). Not all brokers with whom a fund trades have been asked to participate in brokerage commission recapture.
Affiliated Transactions
The Adviser or its affiliates place trades with certain brokers, including NFS, through its Fidelity Capital Markets (FCM) division, and Luminex Trading & Analytics LLC (Luminex), with whom they are under common control or otherwise affiliated, provided the Adviser or its affiliates determine that these affiliates' trade-execution abilities and costs are comparable to those of non-affiliated, qualified brokerage firms, and that such transactions be executed in accordance with applicable rules under the 1940 Act and procedures adopted by the Board of Trustees of the funds and subject to other applicable law. In addition, from time to time, the Adviser or its affiliates place trades with brokers that use NFS or Fidelity Clearing Canada ULC (FCC) as a clearing agent and/or use Level ATS, an alternative trading system that is deemed to be affiliated with the Adviser, for execution services.
In certain circumstances, trades are executed through alternative trading systems or national securities exchanges in which the Adviser or its affiliates have an interest. Any decision to execute a trade through an alternative trading system or exchange in which the Adviser or its affiliates have an interest would be made in accordance with applicable law, including best execution obligations. For trades placed on such a system or exchange, not limited to ones in which the Adviser or its affiliates have an ownership interest, the Adviser or its affiliates derive benefit in the form of increased valuation(s) of its equity interest, where it has an ownership interest, or other remuneration, including rebates.
The Trustees of each fund have approved procedures whereby a fund is permitted to purchase securities that are offered in underwritings in which an affiliate of the adviser or certain other affiliates participate. In addition, for underwritings where such an affiliate participates as a principal underwriter, certain restrictions may apply that could, among other things, limit the amount of securities that the funds could purchase in the underwritings.
Non-U.S. Securities Transactions
To facilitate trade settlement and related activities in non-U.S. securities transactions, the Adviser or its affiliates effect spot foreign currency transactions with foreign currency dealers. In certain circumstances, due to local law and regulation, logistical or operational challenges, or the process for settling securities transactions in certain markets (e.g., short settlement periods), spot currency transactions are effected on behalf of funds by parties other than the Adviser or its affiliates, including funds' custodian banks (working through sub-custodians or agents in the relevant non-U.S. jurisdiction) or broker-dealers that executed the related securities transaction.
Trade Allocation
Although the Trustees and officers of each fund are substantially the same as those of certain other Fidelity ® funds, investment decisions for each fund are made independently from those of other Fidelity ® funds or investment accounts (including proprietary accounts). The same security is often held in the portfolio of more than one of these funds or investment accounts. Simultaneous transactions are inevitable when several funds and investment accounts are managed by the same investment adviser, or an affiliate thereof, particularly when the same security is suitable for the investment objective of more than one fund or investment account.
When two or more funds or investment accounts are simultaneously engaged in the purchase or sale of the same security or instrument, the prices and amounts are allocated in accordance with procedures believed by the Adviser to be appropriate and equitable to each fund or investment account. In some cases this could have a detrimental effect on the price or value of the security or instrument as far as a fund is concerned. In other cases, however, the ability of the funds to participate in volume transactions will produce better executions and prices for the funds.
Commissions Paid
A fund may pay compensation including both commissions and spreads in connection with the placement of portfolio transactions. The amount of brokerage commissions paid by a fund may change from year to year because of, among other things, changing asset levels, shareholder activity, and/or portfolio turnover.
For each of Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%, the following table shows the fund's portfolio turnover rate for the fiscal period(s) ended September 30, 2022 and 2021. Variations in turnover rate may be due to a fluctuating volume of shareholder purchase and redemption orders, market conditions, and/or changes in the Adviser's investment outlook.
Turnover Rates
2022
2021
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
22%
25%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
23%
18%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
16%
22%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
20%
17%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
23%
19%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
23%
20%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
27%
18%
 
 
 
The following table shows the total amount of brokerage commissions paid by the following fund(s), comprising commissions paid on securities and/or futures transactions, as applicable, for the fiscal year(s) ended September 30, 2022, 2021, and 2020. The total amount of brokerage commissions paid is stated as a dollar amount and a percentage of the fund's average net assets.
Fund
Fiscal Year
Ended
 
Dollar
Amount
Percentage
of
Average
Net Assets
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
2022
$
89,843
0.00%
 
2021
$
57,697
0.00%
 
2020
$
105,614
0.00%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
2022
$
38,677
0.00%
 
2021
$
27,693
0.00%
 
2020
$
45,770
0.00%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
2022
$
36,219
0.00%
 
2021
$
25,268
0.00%
 
2020
$
49,293
0.00%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
2022
$
153,182
0.00%
 
2021
$
130,038
0.00%
 
2020
$
250,411
0.00%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
2022
$
58,282
0.00%
 
2021
$
52,557
0.00%
 
2020
$
107,802
0.00%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
2022
$
94,428
0.00%
 
2021
$
96,478
0.00%
 
2020
$
201,635
0.00%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
2022
$
52,369
0.00%
 
2021
$
52,309
0.00%
 
2020
$
116,586
0.00%
The table below shows the total amount of brokerage commissions paid by the following fund(s) to an affiliated broker for the fiscal year(s) ended September 30, 2022, 2021, and 2020. The table also shows the approximate amount of aggregate brokerage commissions paid by a fund to an affiliated broker as a percentage of the approximate aggregate dollar amount of transactions for which the fund paid brokerage commissions as well as the percentage of transactions effected by a fund through an affiliated broker, in each case for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022. Affiliated brokers are paid on a commission basis.
Fund(s)
Fiscal Year Ended
Broker
Affiliated With
C
ommissions
Percentage
of
Aggregate
Brokerage
Commissions
Percentage
of
Aggregate
Dollar
Amount
of
Brokerage
  Transactions
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
2022
FCM
FMR LLC
$
23
0.03%
0.01%
 
2022
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
0.00%
0.00%
 
2021
FCM
FMR LLC
$
32
 
 
 
2021
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
 
2020
FCM
FMR LLC
$
1,677
 
 
 
2020
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
2022
FCM
FMR LLC
$
10
0.03%
0.01%
 
2022
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
0.00%
0.00%
 
2021
FCM
FMR LLC
$
19
 
 
 
2021
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
 
2020
FCM
FMR LLC
$
143
 
 
 
2020
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
2022
FCM
FMR LLC
$
8
0.02%
0.01%
 
2022
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
0.00%
0.00%
 
2021
FCM
FMR LLC
$
20
 
 
 
2021
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
 
2020
FCM
FMR LLC
$
146
 
 
 
2020
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
2022
FCM
FMR LLC
$
38
0.02%
0.01%
 
2022
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
0.00%
0.00%
 
2021
FCM
FMR LLC
$
1,460
 
 
 
2021
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
 
2020
FCM
FMR LLC
$
1,086
 
 
 
2020
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
2022
FCM
FMR LLC
$
15
0.03%
0.01%
 
2022
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
0.00%
0.00%
 
2021
FCM
FMR LLC
$
1,013
 
 
 
2021
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
 
2020
FCM
FMR LLC
$
1,245
 
 
 
2020
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
2022
FCM
FMR LLC
$
11
0.01%
0.00%
 
2022
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
0.00%
0.00%
 
2021
FCM
FMR LLC
$
2,234
 
 
 
2021
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
 
2020
FCM
FMR LLC
$
2,080
 
 
 
2020
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
2022
FCM
FMR LLC
$
0
0.00%
0.00%
 
2022
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
0.00%
0.00%
 
2021
FCM
FMR LLC
$
1,301
 
 
 
2021
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
 
2020
FCM
FMR LLC
$
1,486
 
 
 
2020
Luminex
FMR LLC
$
0
 
 
During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85% paid no brokerage commissions to firms for providing research or brokerage services.
During the twelve-month period ended June 30, 2022, Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85% did not allocate brokerage commissions to firms for providing research or brokerage services.
VALUATION
The NAV is the value of a single share. NAV is computed by adding a class's pro rata share of the value of a fund's investments, cash, and other assets, subtracting the class's pro rata share of the fund's liabilities, subtracting the liabilities allocated to the class, and dividing the result by the number of shares of that class that are outstanding.
The Board of Trustees has designated the fund's investment adviser as the valuation designee responsible for the fair valuation function and performing fair value determinations as needed. The adviser has established a Fair Value Committee (the Committee) to carry out the day-to-day fair valuation responsibilities and has adopted policies and procedures to govern the fair valuation process and the activities of the Committee.
Shares of open-end investment companies (including any underlying Central funds) held by a fund are valued at their respective NAVs. If an underlying fund's NAV is unavailable, shares of that underlying fund will be fair valued in good faith by the Committee in accordance with applicable fair value pricing policies.
Generally, other portfolio securities and assets held by a fund, as well as portfolio securities and assets held by an underlying Central fund, are valued as follows:
Most equity securities are valued at the official closing price or the last reported sale price or, if no sale has occurred, at the last quoted bid price on the primary market or exchange on which they are traded.
Debt securities and other assets for which market quotations are readily available may be valued at market values in the principal market in which they normally are traded, as furnished by recognized dealers in such securities or assets. Or, debt securities and convertible securities may be valued on the basis of information furnished by a pricing service that uses a valuation matrix which incorporates both dealer-supplied valuations and electronic data processing techniques.
Short-term securities with remaining maturities of sixty days or less for which market quotations and information furnished by a pricing service are not readily available may be valued at amortized cost, which approximates current value.
Futures contracts are valued at the settlement or closing price. Options are valued at their market quotations, if available. Swaps are valued daily using quotations received from independent pricing services or recognized dealers.
Prices described above are obtained from pricing services that have been approved by the Committee. A number of pricing services are available and a fund may use more than one of these services. A fund may also discontinue the use of any pricing service at any time. A fund's adviser through the Committee engages in oversight activities with respect to the fund's pricing services, which includes, among other things, testing the prices provided by pricing services prior to calculation of a fund's NAV, conducting periodic due diligence meetings, and periodically reviewing the methodologies and inputs used by these services.
Foreign securities and instruments are valued in their local currency following the methodologies described above. Foreign securities, instruments and currencies are translated to U.S. dollars, based on foreign currency exchange rate quotations supplied by a pricing service as of the close of the New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), which uses a proprietary model to determine the exchange rate. Forward foreign currency exchange contracts are valued at an interpolated rate based on days to maturity between the closest preceding and subsequent settlement period reported by the third party pricing service.
Other portfolio securities and assets for which market quotations, official closing prices, or information furnished by a pricing service are not readily available or, in the opinion of the Committee, are deemed unreliable will be fair valued in good faith by the Committee in accordance with applicable fair value pricing policies. For example, if, in the opinion of the Committee, a security's value has been materially affected by events occurring before a fund's pricing time but after the close of the exchange or market on which the security is principally traded, that security will be fair valued in good faith by the Committee in accordance with applicable fair value pricing policies. In fair valuing a security, the Committee may consider factors including, but not limited to, price movements in futures contracts and American Depositary Receipts (ADRs), market and trading trends, the bid/ask quotes of brokers, and off-exchange institutional trading. The frequency that portfolio securities or assets are fair valued cannot be predicted and may be significant.
In determining the fair value of a private placement security for which market quotations are not available, the Committee generally applies one or more valuation methods including the market approach, income approach and cost approach. The market approach considers factors including the price of recent investments in the same or a similar security or financial metrics of comparable securities. The income approach considers factors including expected future cash flows, security specific risks and corresponding discount rates. The cost approach considers factors including the value of the security's underlying assets and liabilities.
The fund's adviser reports to the Board information regarding the fair valuation process and related material matters.
BUYING, SELLING, AND EXCHANGING INFORMATION
A fund may make redemption payments in whole or in part in readily marketable securities or other property pursuant to procedures approved by the Trustees if FMR determines it is in the best interests of the fund. Such securities or other property will be valued for this purpose as they are valued in computing the NAV of a fund or class, as applicable. Shareholders that receive securities or other property will realize, upon receipt, a gain or loss for tax purposes, and will incur additional costs and be exposed to market risk prior to and upon the sale of such securities or other property.
Each fund, in its discretion, may determine to issue its shares in kind in exchange for securities held by the purchaser having a value, determined in accordance with the fund's policies for valuation of portfolio securities, equal to the purchase price of the fund shares issued. A fund will accept for in-kind purchases only securities or other instruments that are appropriate under its investment objective and policies. In addition, a fund generally will not accept securities of any issuer unless they are liquid, have a readily ascertainable market value, and are not subject to restrictions on resale. All dividends, distributions, and subscription or other rights associated with the securities become the property of the fund, along with the securities. Shares purchased in exchange for securities in kind generally cannot be redeemed for fifteen days following the exchange to allow time for the transfer to settle.
In addition to the exchange privileges listed in each fund's prospectus, each fund offers the privilege of moving between certain share classes of the same fund, as detailed below. Such transactions are subject to eligibility requirements of the applicable class of shares of a fund, and may be subject to applicable sales loads. An exchange between share classes of the same fund generally is a non-taxable event.
Class A: Shares of Class A may be exchanged for Class Z or Class I shares of the same fund.
Class M: Shares of Class M may be exchanged for Class A (on a load-waived basis), Class Z, or Class I shares of the same fund.
Class C: Shares of Class C may be exchanged for Class A, Class M, Class Z, or Class I shares of the same fund.
Class I: Shares of Class I may be exchanged for Class A, if you are no longer eligible for Class I, or Class Z shares of the same fund.
Class Z: Shares of Class Z may be exchanged for Class A or Class I shares of the same fund if you are no longer eligible for Class Z.
Each fund may terminate or modify its exchange privileges in the future.
DISTRIBUTIONS AND TAXES
Dividends. A portion of each fund's income may qualify for the dividends-received deduction available to corporate shareholders. A portion of each fund's dividends, when distributed to individual shareholders, may qualify for taxation at long-term capital gains rates (provided certain holding period requirements are met). A portion of each fund's dividends may be exempt from state and local taxation to the extent that they are derived from certain U.S. Government securities and meet certain requirements. Distributions by a fund to tax-advantaged retirement plan accounts are not taxable currently (but you may be taxed later, upon withdrawal of your investment from such account).
Capital Gain Distributions. Unless your shares of a fund are held in a tax-advantaged retirement plan, each fund's long-term capital gain distributions, including amounts attributable to an underlying fund's long-term capital gain distributions, are federally taxable to shareholders generally as capital gains.
Returns of Capital. If a fund's distributions exceed its taxable income and capital gains realized during a taxable year, all or a portion of the distributions made in the same taxable year may be recharacterized as a return of capital to shareholders. A return of capital distribution will generally not be taxable, but will reduce each shareholder's cost basis in the fund and result in a higher reported capital gain or lower reported capital loss when those shares on which the distribution was received are sold in taxable accounts.
Foreign Tax Credit or Deduction. Foreign governments may impose withholding taxes on dividends and interest earned by a fund with respect to foreign securities held directly by a fund. Foreign governments may also impose taxes on other payments or gains with respect to foreign securities held directly by a fund. As a general matter, if, at the close of its fiscal year, more than 50% of a fund's total assets is invested in securities of foreign issuers, the fund may elect to pass through eligible foreign taxes paid and thereby allow shareholders to take a deduction or, if they meet certain holding period requirements with respect to fund shares, a credit on their individual tax returns. In addition, if at the close of each quarter of its fiscal year at least 50% of a fund's total assets is represented by interests in other regulated investment companies, the same rules will apply to any foreign tax credits that underlying funds pass through to the fund. Special rules may apply to the credit for individuals who receive dividends qualifying for the long-term capital gains tax rate.
Tax Status of the Funds. Each fund intends to qualify each year as a "regulated investment company" under Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code so that it will not be liable for federal tax on income and capital gains distributed to shareholders. In order to qualify as a regulated investment company, and avoid being subject to federal income or excise taxes at the fund level, each fund intends to distribute substantially all of its net investment income and net realized capital gains within each calendar year as well as on a fiscal year basis (if the fiscal year is other than the calendar year), and intends to comply with other tax rules applicable to regulated investment companies.
Other Tax Information. The information above is only a summary of some of the tax consequences generally affecting each fund and its shareholders, and no attempt has been made to discuss individual tax consequences. Some of the information may not apply to certain shareholders, including tax-advantaged retirement plan shareholders. It is up to you or your tax preparer to determine whether the sale of shares of a fund resulted in a capital gain or loss or other tax consequence to you. In addition to federal income taxes, shareholders may be subject to state and local taxes on fund distributions, and shares may be subject to state and local personal property taxes. Investors should consult their tax advisers to determine whether a fund is suitable to their particular tax situation.
TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS
The Trustees, Members of the Advisory Board (if any), and officers of the trust and funds, as applicable, are listed below. The Board of Trustees governs each fund and is responsible for protecting the interests of shareholders. The Trustees are experienced executives who meet periodically throughout the year to oversee each fund's activities, review contractual arrangements with companies that provide services to each fund, oversee management of the risks associated with such activities and contractual arrangements, and review each fund's performance. Each of the Trustees oversees 293 funds.
The Trustees hold office without limit in time except that (a) any Trustee may resign; (b) any Trustee may be removed by written instrument, signed by at least two-thirds of the number of Trustees prior to such removal; (c) any Trustee who requests to be retired or who has become incapacitated by illness or injury may be retired by written instrument signed by a majority of the other Trustees; and (d) any Trustee may be removed at any special meeting of shareholders by a two-thirds vote of the outstanding voting securities of the trust. Each Trustee who is not an interested person (as defined in the 1940 Act) of the trust and the funds is referred to herein as an Independent Trustee. Each Independent Trustee shall retire not later than the last day of the calendar year in which his or her 75th birthday occurs. The Independent Trustees may waive this mandatory retirement age policy with respect to individual Trustees. Officers and Advisory Board Members hold office without limit in time, except that any officer or Advisory Board Member may resign or may be removed by a vote of a majority of the Trustees at any regular meeting or any special meeting of the Trustees. Except as indicated, each individual has held the office shown or other offices in the same company for the past five years.
Experience, Skills, Attributes, and Qualifications of the Trustees. The Governance and Nominating Committee has adopted a statement of policy that describes the experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills that are necessary and desirable for potential Independent Trustee candidates (Statement of Policy). The Board believes that each Trustee satisfied at the time he or she was initially elected or appointed a Trustee, and continues to satisfy, the standards contemplated by the Statement of Policy. The Governance and Nominating Committee also engages professional search firms to help identify potential Independent Trustee candidates who have the experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills consistent with the Statement of Policy. From time to time, additional criteria based on the composition and skills of the current Independent Trustees, as well as experience or skills that may be appropriate in light of future changes to board composition, business conditions, and regulatory or other developments, have also been considered by the professional search firms and the Governance and Nominating Committee. In addition, the Board takes into account the Trustees' commitment and participation in Board and committee meetings, as well as their leadership of standing and ad hoc committees throughout their tenure.
In determining that a particular Trustee was and continues to be qualified to serve as a Trustee, the Board has considered a variety of criteria, none of which, in isolation, was controlling. The Board believes that, collectively, the Trustees have balanced and diverse experience, qualifications, attributes, and skills, which allow the Board to operate effectively in governing each fund and protecting the interests of shareholders. Information about the specific experience, skills, attributes, and qualifications of each Trustee, which in each case led to the Board's conclusion that the Trustee should serve (or continue to serve) as a trustee of the funds, is provided below.
Board Structure and Oversight Function. Abigail P. Johnson is an interested person and currently serves as Chairman. The Trustees have determined that an interested Chairman is appropriate and benefits shareholders because an interested Chairman has a personal and professional stake in the quality and continuity of services provided to the funds. Independent Trustees exercise their informed business judgment to appoint an individual of their choosing to serve as Chairman, regardless of whether the Trustee happens to be independent or a member of management. The Independent Trustees have determined that they can act independently and effectively without having an Independent Trustee serve as Chairman and that a key structural component for assuring that they are in a position to do so is for the Independent Trustees to constitute a substantial majority for the Board. The Independent Trustees also regularly meet in executive session. Michael E. Kenneally serves as Chairman of the Independent Trustees and as such (i) acts as a liaison between the Independent Trustees and management with respect to matters important to the Independent Trustees and (ii) with management prepares agendas for Board meetings.
Fidelity ® funds are overseen by different Boards of Trustees. The funds' Board oversees Fidelity's investment-grade bond, money market, asset allocation and certain equity funds, and other Boards oversee Fidelity's high income and other equity funds. The asset allocation funds may invest in Fidelity ® funds that are overseen by such other Boards. The use of separate Boards, each with its own committee structure, allows the Trustees of each group of Fidelity ® funds to focus on the unique issues of the funds they oversee, including common research, investment, and operational issues. On occasion, the separate Boards establish joint committees to address issues of overlapping consequences for the Fidelity ® funds overseen by each Board.
The Trustees operate using a system of committees to facilitate the timely and efficient consideration of all matters of importance to the Trustees, each fund, and fund shareholders and to facilitate compliance with legal and regulatory requirements and oversight of the funds' activities and associated risks. The Board, acting through its committees, has charged FMR and its affiliates with (i) identifying events or circumstances the occurrence of which could have demonstrably adverse effects on the funds' business and/or reputation; (ii) implementing processes and controls to lessen the possibility that such events or circumstances occur or to mitigate the effects of such events or circumstances if they do occur; and (iii) creating and maintaining a system designed to evaluate continuously business and market conditions in order to facilitate the identification and implementation processes described in (i) and (ii) above. Because the day-to-day operations and activities of the funds are carried out by or through FMR, its affiliates, and other service providers, the funds' exposure to risks is mitigated but not eliminated by the processes overseen by the Trustees. While each of the Board's committees has responsibility for overseeing different aspects of the funds' activities, oversight is exercised primarily through the Operations and Audit Committees. In addition, an ad hoc Board committee of Independent Trustees has worked with FMR to enhance the Board's oversight of investment and financial risks, legal and regulatory risks, technology risks, and operational risks, including the development of additional risk reporting to the Board. Appropriate personnel, including but not limited to the funds' Chief Compliance Officer (CCO), FMR's internal auditor, the independent accountants, the funds' Treasurer and portfolio management personnel, make periodic reports to the Board's committees, as appropriate, including an annual review of Fidelity's risk management program for the Fidelity ® funds. The responsibilities of each standing committee, including their oversight responsibilities, are described further under "Standing Committees of the Trustees."
Interested Trustees*:
Correspondence intended for a Trustee who is an interested person may be sent to Fidelity Investments, 245 Summer Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02210.
Name, Year of Birth; Principal Occupations and Other Relevant Experience+
Abigail P. Johnson (1961)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2009
Trustee
Chairman of the Board of Trustees
Ms. Johnson also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds. Ms. Johnson serves as Chairman (2016-present), Chief Executive Officer (2014-present), and Director (2007-present) of FMR LLC (diversified financial services company), President of Fidelity Financial Services (2012-present) and President of Personal, Workplace and Institutional Services (2005-present). Ms. Johnson is Chairman and Director of Fidelity Management & Research Company LLC (investment adviser firm, 2011-present). Previously, Ms. Johnson served as Chairman and Director of FMR Co., Inc. (investment adviser firm, 2011-2019), Vice Chairman (2007-2016) and President (2013-2016) of FMR LLC, President and a Director of Fidelity Management & Research Company (2001-2005), a Trustee of other investment companies advised by Fidelity Management & Research Company, Fidelity Investments Money Management, Inc. (investment adviser firm), and FMR Co., Inc. (2001-2005), Senior Vice President of the Fidelity ® funds (2001-2005), and managed a number of Fidelity ® funds. Ms. Abigail P. Johnson and Mr. Arthur E. Johnson are not related.
Jennifer Toolin McAuliffe (1959)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2016
Trustee
Ms. McAuliffe also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds and as Trustee of Fidelity Charitable (2020-present). Previously, Ms. McAuliffe served as Co-Head of Fixed Income of Fidelity Investments Limited (now known as FIL Limited (FIL)) (diversified financial services company), Director of Research for FIL's credit and quantitative teams in London, Hong Kong and Tokyo and Director of Research for taxable and municipal bonds at Fidelity Investments Money Management, Inc. Ms. McAuliffe previously served as a member of the Advisory Board of certain Fidelity ® funds (2016). Ms. McAuliffe was previously a lawyer at Ropes & Gray LLP and currently serves as director or trustee of several not-for-profit entities.
* Determined to be an "Interested Trustee" by virtue of, among other things, his or her affiliation with the trust or various entities under common control with FMR.
+ The information includes the Trustee's principal occupation during the last five years and other information relating to the experience, attributes, and skills relevant to the Trustee's qualifications to serve as a Trustee, which led to the conclusion that the Trustee should serve as a Trustee for each fund.
Independent Trustees:
Correspondence intended for an Independent Trustee may be sent to Fidelity Investments, P.O. Box 55235, Boston, Massachusetts 02205-5235.
Name, Year of Birth; Principal Occupations and Other Relevant Experience+
Elizabeth S. Acton (1951)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2013
Trustee
Ms. Acton also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds. Prior to her retirement, Ms. Acton served as Executive Vice President, Finance (2011-2012), Executive Vice President, Chief Financial Officer (2002-2011) and Treasurer (2004-2005) of Comerica Incorporated (financial services). Prior to joining Comerica, Ms. Acton held a variety of positions at Ford Motor Company (1983-2002), including Vice President and Treasurer (2000-2002) and Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer of Ford Motor Credit Company (1998-2000). Ms. Acton currently serves as a member of the Board and Audit and Finance Committees of Beazer Homes USA, Inc. (homebuilding, 2012-present). Ms. Acton previously served as a member of the Advisory Board of certain Fidelity ® funds (2013-2016).
Ann E. Dunwoody (1953)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2018
Trustee
General Dunwoody also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds. General Dunwoody (United States Army, Retired) was the first woman in U.S. military history to achieve the rank of four-star general and prior to her retirement in 2012 held a variety of positions within the U.S. Army, including Commanding General, U.S. Army Material Command (2008-2012). General Dunwoody currently serves as President of First to Four LLC (leadership and mentoring services, 2012-present), a member of the Board and Nomination and Corporate Governance Committees of Kforce Inc. (professional staffing services, 2016-present) and a member of the Board of Automattic Inc. (software engineering, 2018-present). Previously, General Dunwoody served as a member of the Advisory Board and Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of L3 Technologies, Inc. (communication, electronic, sensor and aerospace systems, 2013-2019) and a member of the Board and Audit and Sustainability and Corporate Responsibility Committees of Republic Services, Inc. (waste collection, disposal and recycling, 2013-2016). Ms. Dunwoody also serves on several boards for non-profit organizations, including as a member of the Board, Chair of the Nomination and Governance Committee and a member of the Audit Committee of Logistics Management Institute (consulting non-profit, 2012-present), a member of the Council of Trustees for the Association of the United States Army (advocacy non-profit, 2013-present), a member of the Board of Florida Institute of Technology (2015-present) and a member of the Board of ThanksUSA (military family education non-profit, 2014-present). General Dunwoody previously served as a member of the Advisory Board of certain Fidelity ® funds (2018).
John Engler (1948)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2014
Trustee
Mr. Engler also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds. Previously, Mr. Engler served as Governor of Michigan (1991-2003), President of the Business Roundtable (2011-2017) and interim President of Michigan State University (2018-2019). Mr. Engler currently serves as a member of the Board of Stride, Inc. (formerly K12 Inc.) (technology-based education company, 2012-present). Previously, Mr. Engler served as a member of the Board of Universal Forest Products (manufacturer and distributor of wood and wood-alternative products, 2003-2019) and Trustee of The Munder Funds (2003-2014). Mr. Engler previously served as a member of the Advisory Board of certain Fidelity ® funds (2014-2016).
Robert F. Gartland (1951)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2010
Trustee
Mr. Gartland also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds. Prior to his retirement, Mr. Gartland held a variety of positions at Morgan Stanley (financial services, 1979-2007), including Managing Director (1987-2007) and Chase Manhattan Bank (1975-1978). Mr. Gartland previously served as Chairman and an investor in Gartland & Mellina Group Corp. (consulting, 2009-2019), as a member of the Board of National Securities Clearing Corporation (1993-1996) and as Chairman of TradeWeb (2003-2004).
Arthur E. Johnson (1947)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2008
Trustee
Mr. Johnson also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds. Prior to his retirement, Mr. Johnson served as Senior Vice President of Corporate Strategic Development of Lockheed Martin Corporation (defense contractor, 1999-2009). Mr. Johnson currently serves as a member of the Board of Booz Allen Hamilton (management consulting, 2011-present). Mr. Johnson previously served as a member of the Board of Eaton Corporation plc (diversified power management, 2009-2019) and a member of the Board of AGL Resources, Inc. (holding company, 2002-2016). Mr. Johnson previously served as Chairman (2018-2021) and Vice Chairman (2015-2018) of the Independent Trustees of certain Fidelity® funds. Mr. Arthur E. Johnson is not related to Ms. Abigail P. Johnson.     
Michael E. Kenneally (1954)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2009
Trustee
Chairman of the Independent Trustees
Mr. Kenneally also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds and was Vice Chairman (2018-2021) of the Independent Trustees of certain Fidelity ® funds. Prior to retirement in 2005, he was Chairman and Global Chief Executive Officer of Credit Suisse Asset Management, the worldwide fund management and institutional investment business of Credit Suisse Group. Previously, Mr. Kenneally was an Executive Vice President and the Chief Investment Officer for Bank of America. In this role, he was responsible for the investment management, strategy and products delivered to the bank's institutional, high-net-worth and retail clients. Earlier, Mr. Kenneally directed the organization's equity and quantitative research groups. He began his career as a research analyst and then spent more than a dozen years as a portfolio manager for endowments, pension plans and mutual funds. He earned the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation in 1991.     
Marie L. Knowles (1946)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2001
Trustee
Ms. Knowles also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds. Prior to her retirement, Ms. Knowles held several positions at Atlantic Richfield Company (diversified energy), including Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (1996-2000), Senior Vice President (1993-1996) and President of ARCO Transportation Company (pipeline and tanker operations, 1993-1996). Ms. Knowles currently serves as a member of the Board of the Santa Catalina Island Company (real estate, 2009-present), a member of the Investment Company Institute Board of Governors and a member of the Governing Council of the Independent Directors Council (2014-present). Ms. Knowles also serves as a member of the Advisory Board for the School of Engineering of the University of Southern California. Ms. Knowles previously served as a member of the Board of McKesson Corporation (healthcare service, 2002-2021). In addition, Ms. Knowles previously served as Chairman (2015-2018) and Vice Chairman (2012-2015) of the Independent Trustees of certain Fidelity ® funds.
Mark A. Murray (1954)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2016
Trustee
Mr. Murray also serves as Trustee of other Fidelity ® funds. Previously, Mr. Murray served as Co-Chief Executive Officer (2013-2016), President (2006-2013) and Vice Chairman (2013-2020) of Meijer, Inc. Mr. Murray serves as a member of the Board (2009-present) and Public Policy and Responsibility Committee (2009-present) and Chair of the Nuclear Review Committee (2019-present) of DTE Energy Company (diversified energy company). Mr. Murray previously served as a member of the Board of Spectrum Health (not-for-profit health system, 2015-2019) and as a member of the Board and Audit Committee and Chairman of the Nominating and Corporate Governance Committee of Universal Forest Products, Inc. (manufacturer and distributor of wood and wood-alternative products, 2004-2016). Mr. Murray also serves as a member of the Board of many community and professional organizations. Mr. Murray previously served as a member of the Advisory Board of certain Fidelity ® funds (2016).
+ The information includes the Trustee's principal occupation during the last five years and other information relating to the experience, attributes, and skills relevant to the Trustee's qualifications to serve as a Trustee, which led to the conclusion that the Trustee should serve as a Trustee for each fund.
Advisory Board Members and Officers:
Correspondence intended for an officer may be sent to Fidelity Investments, 245 Summer Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02210. Officers appear below in alphabetical order.
Name, Year of Birth; Principal Occupation
Laura M. Bishop (1961)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2022
Member of the Advisory Board
Ms. Bishop also serves as a Member of the Advisory Board of other funds. Prior to her retirement, Ms. Bishop held a variety of positions at United Services Automobile Association (2001-2020), including Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer (2014-2020) and Senior Vice President and Deputy Chief Financial Officer (2012-2014). Ms. Bishop currently serves as a member of the Audit Committee and Compensation and Personnel Committee (2021-present) of the Board of Directors of Korn Ferry (global organizational consulting).    
Robert W. Helm (1957)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2021
Member of the Advisory Board
Mr. Helm also serves as a Member of the Advisory Board of other Fidelity® funds. Mr. Helm was formerly Deputy Chairman (2003-2020), partner (1991-2020) and an associate (1984-1991) of Dechert LLP (formerly Dechert Price & Rhoads). Mr. Helm currently serves on boards and committees of several not-for-profit organizations.     
Craig S. Brown (1977)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2019
Assistant Treasurer
Mr. Brown also serves as an officer of other funds. Mr. Brown serves as Assistant Treasurer of FIMM, LLC (2021-present) and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2013-present).     
John J. Burke III (1964)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2018
Chief Financial Officer
Mr. Burke also serves as Chief Financial Officer of other funds. Mr. Burke serves as Head of Investment Operations for Fidelity Fund and Investment Operations (2018-present) and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (1998-present). Previously Mr. Burke served as head of Asset Management Investment Operations (2012-2018).     
David J. Carter (1973)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2020
Assistant Secretary
Mr. Carter also serves as Assistant Secretary of other funds. Mr. Carter serves as Senior Vice President, Deputy General Counsel (2022-present) and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2005-present).     
Jonathan Davis (1968)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2010
Assistant Treasurer
Mr. Davis also serves as an officer of other funds. Mr. Davis serves as Assistant Treasurer of FIMM, LLC (2021-present), FMR Capital, Inc. (2017-present), FD Funds GP LLC (2021-present), FD Funds Holding LLC (2021-present), and FD Funds Management LLC (2021-present); and is an employee of Fidelity Investments. Previously, Mr. Davis served as Vice President and Associate General Counsel of FMR LLC (diversified financial services company, 2003-2010).     
Laura M. Del Prato (1964)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2018
President and Treasurer
Ms. Del Prato also serves as an officer of other funds. Ms. Del Prato serves as Assistant Treasurer of FIMM, LLC (2021-present) and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2017-present). Previously, Ms. Del Prato served as President and Treasurer of The North Carolina Capital Management Trust: Cash Portfolio and Term Portfolio (2018-2020). Prior to joining Fidelity Investments, Ms. Del Prato served as a Managing Director and Treasurer of the JPMorgan Mutual Funds (2014-2017). Prior to JPMorgan, Ms. Del Prato served as a partner at Cohen Fund Audit Services (accounting firm, 2012-2013) and KPMG LLP (accounting firm, 2004-2012).     
Colm A. Hogan (1973)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2016
Assistant Treasurer
Mr. Hogan also serves as an officer of other funds. Mr. Hogan serves as Assistant Treasurer of FIMM, LLC (2021-present) and FMR Capital, Inc. (2017-present) and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2005-present). Previously, Mr. Hogan served as Deputy Treasurer of certain Fidelity ® funds (2016-2020) and Assistant Treasurer of certain Fidelity ® funds (2016-2018).     
Cynthia Lo Bessette (1969)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2019
Secretary and Chief Legal Officer (CLO)
Ms. Lo Bessette also serves as an officer of other funds. Ms. Lo Bessette serves as CLO, Secretary, and Senior Vice President of Fidelity Management & Research Company LLC (investment adviser firm, 2019-present); CLO of Fidelity Management & Research (Hong Kong) Limited, FMR Investment Management (UK) Limited, and Fidelity Management & Research (Japan) Limited (investment adviser firms, 2019-present); Secretary of FD Funds GP LLC (2021-present), FD Funds Holding LLC (2021-present), and FD Funds Management LLC (2021-present); and Assistant Secretary of FIMM, LLC (2019-present). She is a Senior Vice President and Deputy General Counsel of FMR LLC (diversified financial services company, 2019-present), and is an employee of Fidelity Investments. Previously, Ms. Lo Bessette served as CLO, Secretary, and Senior Vice President of FMR Co., Inc. (investment adviser firm, 2019); Secretary of Fidelity SelectCo, LLC and Fidelity Investments Money Management, Inc. (investment adviser firms, 2019). Prior to joining Fidelity Investments, Ms. Lo Bessette was Executive Vice President, General Counsel (2016-2019) and Senior Vice President, Deputy General Counsel (2015-2016) of OppenheimerFunds (investment management company) and Deputy Chief Legal Officer (2013-2015) of Jennison Associates LLC (investment adviser firm).     
Chris Maher (1972)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2013
Assistant Treasurer
Mr. Maher also serves as an officer of other funds. Mr. Maher serves as Assistant Treasurer of FIMM, LLC (2021-present) and FMR Capital, Inc. (2017-present), and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2008-present). Previously, Mr. Maher served as Assistant Treasurer of certain funds (2013-2020); Vice President of Asset Management Compliance (2013), Vice President of the Program Management Group of FMR (investment adviser firm, 2010-2013), and Vice President of Valuation Oversight (2008-2010).     
Kenneth B. Robins (1969)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2020
Chief Compliance Officer
Mr. Robins also serves as an officer of other funds. Mr. Robins serves as Compliance Officer of Fidelity Management & Research Company LLC (investment adviser firm, 2016-present) and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2004-present). Previously, Mr. Robins served as Compliance Officer of FMR Co., Inc. (investment adviser firm, 2016-2019), as Executive Vice President of Fidelity Investments Money Management, Inc. (investment adviser firm, 2013-2016) and served in other fund officer roles.     
Brett Segaloff (1972)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2021
Anti-Money Laundering (AML) Officer
Mr. Segaloff also serves as an AML Officer of other funds and other related entities. He is Director, Anti-Money Laundering (2007-present) of FMR LLC (diversified financial services company) and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (1996-present).     
Stacie M. Smith (1974)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2013
Assistant Treasurer
Ms. Smith also serves as an officer of other funds. Ms. Smith serves as Assistant Treasurer of FIMM, LLC (2021-present) and FMR Capital, Inc. (2017-present), is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2009-present), and has served in other fund officer roles. Prior to joining Fidelity Investments, Ms. Smith served as Senior Audit Manager of Ernst & Young LLP (accounting firm, 1996-2009). Previously, Ms. Smith served as Assistant Treasurer (2013-2019) and Deputy Treasurer (2013-2016) of certain Fidelity ® funds.     
Jim Wegmann (1979)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2021
Deputy Treasurer
Mr. Wegmann also serves as an officer of other funds. Mr. Wegmann serves as Assistant Treasurer of FIMM, LLC (2021-present) and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2011-present). Previously, Mr. Wegmann served as Assistant Treasurer of certain Fidelity ® funds (2019-2021).     
Vadim Zlotnikov (1962)
Year of Election or Appointment: 2019
Vice President
Mr. Zlotnikov also serves as Vice President of other funds. Mr. Zlotnikov serves as President and Director of Fidelity Diversifying Solutions LLC (investment adviser firm, 2021-present), President and Director of FIAM LLC (investment adviser firm, 2020-present), and is an employee of Fidelity Investments (2018-present). Previously, Mr. Zlotnikov served as President and Chief Investment Officer of Global Asset Allocation (2018-2020). Prior to joining Fidelity Investments, Mr. Zlotnikov served as Co-Head of Multi-Asset Solutions, Chief Market Strategist, and CIO of Systematic Strategies with AllianceBernstein (investment adviser firm, 2002-2018).      
Standing Committees of the Trustees. The Board of Trustees has established various committees to support the Independent Trustees in acting independently in pursuing the best interests of the funds and their shareholders. Currently, the Board of Trustees has four standing committees. The members of each committee are Independent Trustees.
The Operations Committee is composed of all of the Independent Trustees, with Mr. Kenneally currently serving as Chair. The committee normally meets at least six times a year, or more frequently as called by the Chair, and serves as a forum for consideration of issues of importance to, or calling for particular determinations by, the Independent Trustees. The committee considers matters involving potential conflicts of interest between the funds and FMR and its affiliates, including matters involving potential claims of one or more funds (e.g., for reimbursements of expenses or losses) against FMR, and reviews proposed contracts and the proposed continuation of contracts between the funds and FMR and its affiliates, and annually reviews and makes recommendations regarding contracts with third parties unaffiliated with FMR, including insurance coverage and custody agreements. The committee has oversight of compliance issues not specifically within the scope of any other committee. These matters include, but are not limited to, significant non-conformance with contract requirements and other significant regulatory matters and recommending to the Board of Trustees the designation of a person to serve as the funds' CCO. The committee (i) serves as a primary point of contact (generally after the Independent Trustee who serves as a liaison for the CCO) for the CCO with regard to Board-related functions; (ii) oversees the annual performance review of the CCO; (iii) makes recommendations concerning the CCO's compensation; and (iv) makes recommendations as needed in respect of the removal of the CCO.
The Audit Committee is composed of all of the Independent Trustees, with Ms. Acton currently serving as Chair. At least one committee member will be an "audit committee financial expert" as defined by the SEC. The committee normally meets four times a year, or more frequently as called by the Chair or a majority of committee members. The committee meets separately, at least annually, with the funds' Treasurer, with the funds' Chief Financial Officer, with personnel responsible for the internal audit function of FMR LLC, with the funds' outside auditors, and with the funds' CCO. The committee has direct responsibility for the appointment, compensation, and oversight of the work of the outside auditors employed by the funds. The committee assists the Trustees in overseeing and monitoring: (i) the systems of internal accounting and financial controls of the funds and the funds' service providers (to the extent such controls impact the funds' financial statements); (ii) the funds' auditors and the annual audits of the funds' financial statements; (iii) the financial reporting processes of the funds; (iv) whistleblower reports; and (v) the accounting policies and disclosures of the funds. The committee considers and acts upon (i) the provision by any outside auditor of any non-audit services for any fund, and (ii) the provision by any outside auditor of certain non-audit services to fund service providers and their affiliates to the extent that such approval (in the case of this clause (ii)) is required under applicable regulations of the SEC. It is responsible for approving all audit engagement fees and terms for the funds and for resolving disagreements between a fund and any outside auditor regarding any fund's financial reporting. Auditors of the funds report directly to the committee. The committee will obtain assurance of independence and objectivity from the outside auditors, including a formal written statement delineating all relationships between the auditor and the funds and any service providers consistent with the rules of the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board. It oversees and receives reports on the funds' service providers' internal controls and reviews the adequacy and effectiveness of the service providers' accounting and financial controls, including: (i) any significant deficiencies or material weaknesses in the design or operation of internal controls over financial reporting that are reasonably likely to adversely affect the funds' ability to record, process, summarize, and report financial data; (ii) any change in the fund's internal control over financial reporting that has materially affected, or is reasonably likely to materially affect, the fund's internal control over financial reporting; and (iii) any fraud, whether material or not, that involves management or other employees who have a significant role in the funds' or service providers internal controls over financial reporting. The committee will also review any correspondence with regulators or governmental agencies or published reports that raise material issues regarding the funds' financial statements or accounting policies. These matters may also be reviewed by the Operations Committee. The committee reviews at least annually a report from each outside auditor describing any material issues raised by the most recent internal quality control, peer review, or Public Company Accounting Oversight Board examination of the auditing firm and any material issues raised by any inquiry or investigation by governmental or professional authorities of the auditing firm and in each case any steps taken to deal with such issues. The committee will oversee and receive reports on the funds' financial reporting process from the funds' Treasurer and outside auditors and will oversee the resolution of any disagreements concerning financial reporting among applicable parties. The committee will discuss with FMR, the funds' Treasurer, outside auditors and, if appropriate, internal audit personnel of FMR LLC their qualitative judgments about the appropriateness and acceptability of accounting principles and financial disclosure practices used or proposed for adoption by the funds. The committee will review with FMR, the funds' outside auditor, internal audit personnel of FMR LLC and legal counsel, as appropriate, matters related to the audits of the funds' financial statements. The committee will discuss regularly and oversee the review of the internal controls of the funds and their service providers with respect to accounting, financial matters and risk management programs related to the funds. The committee will review periodically the funds' major internal controls exposures and the steps that have been taken to monitor and control such exposures.
The Fair Valuation Committee is composed of all of the Independent Trustees, with Mr. Murray currently serving as Chair. The Committee normally meets quarterly, or more frequently as called by the Chair. The Fair Valuation Committee oversees the valuation of securities held by the funds, including the fair valuation of securities by the funds' valuation designee. The Committee receives and reviews related reports and information consistent with its oversight obligations.
The Governance and Nominating Committee is composed of Messrs. Kenneally (Chair) and Gartland (Vice Chair), and Ms. Acton. The committee meets as called by the Chair. With respect to fund governance and board administration matters, the committee periodically reviews procedures of the Board of Trustees and its committees (including committee charters) and periodically reviews compensation of Independent Trustees. The committee monitors corporate governance matters and makes recommendations to the Board of Trustees on the frequency and structure of the Board of Trustee meetings and on any other aspect of Board procedures. It acts as the administrative committee under the retirement plan for Independent Trustees who retired prior to December 30, 1996 and under the fee deferral plan for Independent Trustees. It monitors the performance of legal counsel employed by both the funds and the Independent Trustees. The committee will engage and oversee any counsel utilized by the Independent Trustees as may be necessary or appropriate under applicable regulations or otherwise. The committee also approves Board administrative matters applicable to Independent Trustees, such as expense reimbursement policies and compensation for attendance at meetings, conferences and other events. The committee oversees compliance with the provisions of the code of ethics and any supplemental policies regarding personal securities transactions applicable to the Independent Trustees. The committee reviews the functioning of each Board committee and makes recommendations for any changes, including the creation or elimination of standing or ad hoc Board committees. The committee monitors regulatory and other developments to determine whether to recommend modifications to the committee's responsibilities or other Trustee policies and procedures in light of rule changes, reports concerning "recommended practices" in corporate governance and other developments in mutual fund governance. The committee meets with Independent Trustees at least once a year to discuss matters relating to fund governance. The committee recommends that the Board establish such special or ad hoc Board committees as may be desirable or necessary from time to time in order to address ethical, legal, or other matters that may arise. The committee also oversees the annual self-evaluation of the Board of Trustees and establishes procedures to allow it to exercise this oversight function. In conducting this oversight, the committee shall address all matters that it considers relevant to the performance of the Board of Trustees and shall report the results of its evaluation to the Board of Trustees, including any recommended amendments to the principles of governance, and any recommended changes to the funds' or the Board of Trustees' policies, procedures, and structures. The committee reviews periodically the size and composition of the Board of Trustees as a whole and recommends, if necessary, measures to be taken so that the Board of Trustees reflects the appropriate balance of knowledge, experience, skills, expertise, and diversity required for the Board as a whole and contains at least the minimum number of Independent Trustees required by law. The committee makes nominations for the election or appointment of Independent Trustees and non-management Members of any Advisory Board, and for membership on committees. The committee has the authority to retain and terminate any third-party advisers, including authority to approve fees and other retention terms. Such advisers may include search firms to identify Independent Trustee candidates and board compensation consultants. The committee may conduct or authorize investigations into or studies of matters within the committee's scope of responsibilities, and may retain, at the funds' expense, such independent counsel or other advisers as it deems necessary. The committee will consider nominees to the Board of Trustees recommended by shareholders based upon the criteria applied to candidates presented to the committee by a search firm or other source. Recommendations, along with appropriate background material concerning the candidate that demonstrates his or her ability to serve as an Independent Trustee of the funds, should be submitted to the Chair of the committee at the address maintained for communications with Independent Trustees. If the committee retains a search firm, the Chair will generally forward all such submissions to the search firm for evaluation. With respect to the criteria for selecting Independent Trustees, it is expected that all candidates will possess the following minimum qualifications: (i) unquestioned personal integrity; (ii) not an interested person of the funds within the meaning of the 1940 Act; (iii) does not have a material relationship (e.g., commercial, banking, consulting, legal, or accounting) with the adviser, any sub-adviser or their affiliates that could create an appearance of lack of independence in respect of the funds; (iv) has the disposition to act independently in respect of FMR and its affiliates and others in order to protect the interests of the funds and all shareholders; (v) ability to attend regularly scheduled Board meetings during the year; (vi) demonstrates sound business judgment gained through broad experience in significant positions where the candidate has dealt with management, technical, financial, or regulatory issues; (vii) sufficient financial or accounting knowledge to add value in the complex financial environment of the funds; (viii) experience on corporate or other institutional oversight bodies having similar responsibilities, but which board memberships or other relationships could not result in business or regulatory conflicts with the funds; and (ix) capacity for the hard work and attention to detail that is required to be an effective Independent Trustee in light of the funds' complex regulatory, operational, and marketing setting. The Governance and Nominating Committee may determine that a candidate who does not have the type of previous experience or knowledge referred to above should nevertheless be considered as a nominee if the Governance and Nominating Committee finds that the candidate has additional qualifications such that his or her qualifications, taken as a whole, demonstrate the same level of fitness to serve as an Independent Trustee.
During the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, each committee held the number of meetings shown in the table below:
COMMITTEE
NUMBER OF MEETINGS HELD
Operations Committee
8
Audit Committee
5
Fair Valuation Committee
4
Governance and Nominating Committee
12
The following table sets forth information describing the dollar range of equity securities beneficially owned by each Trustee in each fund and in all funds in the aggregate within the same fund family overseen by the Trustee for the calendar year ended December 31, 2021.
Interested Trustees
DOLLAR RANGE OF
FUND SHARES
Abigail P Johnson
Jennifer Toolin McAuliffe
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
none
none
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
none
none
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
none
none
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
none
none
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
none
over $100,000
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
none
none
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
none
none
 
 
 
AGGREGATE DOLLAR RANGE OF
FUND SHARES IN ALL FUNDS
OVERSEEN WITHIN FUND FAMILY
over $100,000
over $100,000
 
 
Independent Trustees
DOLLAR RANGE OF
FUND SHARES
Elizabeth Acton
Ann Dunwoody
John Engler
Robert Gartland
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
over $100,000
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
none
over $100,000
none
over $100,000
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
none
none
none
none
 
AGGREGATE DOLLAR RANGE OF
FUND SHARES IN ALL FUNDS
OVERSEEN WITHIN FUND FAMILY
over $100,000
over $100,000
over $100,000
over $100,000
DOLLAR RANGE OF
FUND SHARES
Arthur Johnson
Michael Kenneally
Marie Knowles
Mark Murray
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
none
none
none
none
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
none
none
none
none
 
AGGREGATE DOLLAR RANGE OF
FUND SHARES IN ALL FUNDS
OVERSEEN WITHIN FUND FAMILY
over $100,000
over $100,000
over $100,000
over $100,000
The following table sets forth information describing the compensation of each Trustee and Member of the Advisory Board (if any) for his or her services for the fiscal year ended September 30, 2022, or calendar year ended December 31, 2021, as applicable.
Compensation Table (A)
AGGREGATE
COMPENSATION
FROM A FUND
 
Elizabeth Acton
 
 
Laura Bishop (B)
 
 
Ann Dunwoody
 
 
John Engler
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
$
1,809
 
$
148
 
$
1,602
 
$
1,597
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
$
776
 
$
61
 
$
687
 
$
685
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
$
719
 
$
60
 
$
637
 
$
635
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
$
3,129
 
$
252
 
$
2,771
 
$
2,762
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
$
1,199
 
$
99
 
$
1,062
 
$
1,058
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
$
1,916
 
$
158
 
$
1,697
 
$
1,691
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
$
1,077
 
$
89
 
$
954
 
$
951
 
TOTAL COMPENSATION
FROM THE FUND COMPLEX (C)
$
517,500
-
$
472,500
$
472,500
AGGREGATE
COMPENSATION
FROM A FUND
 
Robert Gartland
 
 
Robert Helm (D)
 
 
Arthur Johnson
 
 
Michael Kenneally
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
$
1,825
 
$
1,602
 
$
1,602
 
$
1,990
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
$
783
 
$
687
 
$
687
 
$
854
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
$
725
 
$
637
 
$
637
 
$
791
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
$
3,157
 
$
2,771
 
$
2,771
 
$
3,443
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
$
1,210
 
$
1,062
 
$
1,062
 
$
1,320
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
$
1,933
 
$
1,697
 
$
1,697
 
$
2,108
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
$
1,087
 
$
954
 
$
954
 
$
1,185
 
TOTAL COMPENSATION
FROM THE FUND COMPLEX (C)
$
502,500
$
275,333
$
560,000
$
552,500
AGGREGATE
COMPENSATION
FROM A FUND
 
Marie Knowles
 
 
Mark Murray
 
 
 
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
$
1,602
 
$
1,602
 
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
$
687
 
$
687
 
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
$
637
 
$
637
 
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
$
2,771
 
$
2,771
 
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
$
1,062
 
$
1,062
 
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
$
1,697
 
$
1,697
 
 
 
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
$
954
 
$
954
 
 
 
TOTAL COMPENSATION
FROM THE FUND COMPLEX (C)
$
490,500
$
472,500
 
 
(A) Abigail P. Johnson and Jennifer Toolin McAuliffe are interested persons and are compensated by Fidelity.
 
 
(B) Ms. Bishop serves as a Member of the Advisory Board of Fidelity Charles Street Trust effective September 1, 2022.
 
 
(C) Reflects compensation received for the calendar year ended December 31, 2021 for 286 funds of 31 trusts (including Fidelity Central Investment Portfolios II LLC). Compensation figures include cash and may include amounts elected to be deferred. Certain individuals elected voluntarily to defer a portion of their compensation as follows: Elizabeth S. Acton, $108,000; Ann E. Dunwoody, $260,875; Robert F. Gartland, $180,000; Robert W. Helm, $149,126; and Mark A. Murray, $260,875.
 
 
(D) Mr. Helm serves as a Member of the Advisory Board of Fidelity Charles Street Trust effective June 1, 2021.
 
 
As of September 30, 2022, the Trustees, Members of the Advisory Board (if any), and officers of each fund owned, in the aggregate, less than 1% of each class's total outstanding shares, with respect to each fund.
As of September 30, 2022, the following owned of record and/or beneficially 5% or more of the outstanding shares:
Fund or Class Name
Owner Name
City
State
Ownership %
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class A
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
11.17%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class A
J P MORGAN SECURITIES INC
BROOKLYN
NY
9.09%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class A
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
7.19%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class A
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
6.85%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class A
FIRST CLEARING LLC
SAINT LOUIS
MO
5.20%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class C
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
15.69%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class C
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
9.85%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class C
J P MORGAN SECURITIES INC
BROOKLYN
NY
8.64%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class I
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
22.91%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class I
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
18.49%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class I
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
11.81%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class M
FIRST CLEARING LLC
SAINT LOUIS
MO
12.93%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 20% - Class Z
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - CONSERVATIVE INCOME POOL
BOSTON
MA
99.23%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class A
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
13.04%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class A
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
10.71%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class A
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
10.18%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class C
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
19.43%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class C
FIRST CLEARING LLC
SAINT LOUIS
MO
14.68%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class C
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
12.98%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class C
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
12.39%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class I
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
26.49%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class I
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
20.32%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class I
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
13.38%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class M
SAMMONS FINANCIAL NETWORK LLC
WEST DES MOINES
IA
38.26%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 30% - Class Z
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - INCOME POOL
BOSTON
MA
97.72%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class A
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
12.88%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class A
ADP BROKERDEALER INC
BOSTON
MA
12.67%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class A
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
12.42%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class A
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
5.17%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class C
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
21.25%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class C
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
14.72%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class C
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
11.23%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class C
FIRST CLEARING LLC
SAINT LOUIS
MO
6.94%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class C
J P MORGAN SECURITIES INC
BROOKLYN
NY
5.49%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class I
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
25.28%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class I
IDAHO TRUST BANK
BOISE
ID
10.05%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class I
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
7.92%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class I
EFC FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
FARGO
ND
6.73%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class I
NYL BENEFITS SERVICES
WESTWOOD
MA
6.47%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class I
FIRST CLEARING LLC
SAINT LOUIS
MO
5.74%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class I
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
5.26%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class M
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
7.42%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class M
GREAT WEST LIFE AND ANNUITY
GREENWOOD VILLAGE
CO
6.05%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 40% - Class Z
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - MODERATE INCOME POOL
BOSTON
MA
96.43%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class A
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
12.82%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class A
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
10.52%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class A
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
5.89%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class C
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
14.07%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class C
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
11.02%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class C
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
9.82%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class C
FIRST CLEARING LLC
SAINT LOUIS
MO
6.81%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class C
MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY
NEW YORK
NY
5.57%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class I
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
24.54%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class I
MORGAN STANLEY SMITH BARNEY
NEW YORK
NY
8.98%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class I
IDAHO TRUST BANK
BOISE
ID
7.43%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class M
SAMMONS FINANCIAL NETWORK LLC
WEST DES MOINES
IA
30.44%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 50% - Class Z
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - BALANCED POOL
BOSTON
MA
98.13%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class A
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
14.82%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class A
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
9.11%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class C
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
9.79%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class C
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
8.50%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class C
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
8.19%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class I
CHET ADVISOR 529 ASSET MANAGER 60% PORTFOLIO
MERRIMACK
NH
35.93%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class I
NEW HAMPSHIRE HIGHER EDUCATION SAVINGS PLAN TRUST
MERRIMACK
NH
19.26%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class I
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
7.47%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class I
EFC FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
FARGO
ND
5.46%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class I
CHARLES SCHWAB CO INC
SAN FRANCISCO
CA
5.24%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class M
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
7.10%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class M
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
5.54%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 60% - Class Z
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - MODERATE GROWTH POOL
BOSTON
MA
97.37%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class A
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
14.74%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class A
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
6.93%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class C
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
16.77%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class C
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
13.85%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class C
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
7.30%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class C
FIRST CLEARING LLC
SAINT LOUIS
MO
5.80%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class I
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
8.83%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class I
EFC FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
FARGO
ND
8.34%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class I
IDAHO TRUST BANK
BOISE
ID
5.45%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class M
SAMMONS FINANCIAL NETWORK LLC
WEST DES MOINES
IA
24.68%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 70% - Class Z
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - GROWTH POOL
BOSTON
MA
98.02%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class A
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
28.72%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class A
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
7.48%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class C
AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL SERVICES INC
MINNEAPOLIS
MN
23.51%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class C
PERSHING LLC
JERSEY CITY
NJ
14.77%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class C
LPL FINANCIAL CORPORATION
SAN DIEGO
CA
6.99%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class I
EFC FINANCIAL SERVICES LLC
FARGO
ND
23.96%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class I
RAYMOND JAMES ASSOCIATES INC
SAINT PETERSBURG
FL
5.31%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class M
SAMMONS FINANCIAL NETWORK LLC
WEST DES MOINES
IA
21.62%
Fidelity Advisor Asset Manager® 85% - Class Z
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - AGGRESSIVE GROWTH POOL
BOSTON
MA
95.65%
As of September 30, 2022, the following owned of record and/or beneficially 25% or more of the outstanding shares:
Fund Name
Owner Name
City
State
Ownership %
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - CONSERVATIVE INCOME POOL
BOSTON
MA
28.61%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - MODERATE GROWTH POOL
BOSTON
MA
34.62%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - GROWTH POOL
BOSTON
MA
30.10%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
FIDELITY CHARITABLE GIFT FUND℠ - AGGRESSIVE GROWTH POOL
BOSTON
MA
33.99%
A shareholder owning of record or beneficially more than 25% of a fund's outstanding shares may be considered a controlling person. That shareholder's vote could have a more significant effect on matters presented at a shareholders' meeting than votes of other shareholders.
CONTROL OF INVESTMENT ADVISERS
FMR LLC, as successor by merger to FMR Corp., is the ultimate parent company of FMR, FMR Investment Management (UK) Limited, Fidelity Management & Research (Hong Kong) Limited, and Fidelity Management & Research (Japan) Limited. The voting common shares of FMR LLC are divided into two series. Series B is held predominantly by members of the Johnson family, including Abigail P. Johnson, directly or through trusts, and is entitled to 49% of the vote on any matter acted upon by the voting common shares. Series A is held predominantly by non-Johnson family member employees of FMR LLC and its affiliates and is entitled to 51% of the vote on any such matter. The Johnson family group and all other Series B shareholders have entered into a shareholders' voting agreement under which all Series B shares will be voted in accordance with the majority vote of Series B shares. Under the 1940 Act, control of a company is presumed where one individual or group of individuals owns more than 25% of the voting securities of that company. Therefore, through their ownership of voting common shares and the execution of the shareholders' voting agreement, members of the Johnson family may be deemed, under the 1940 Act, to form a controlling group with respect to FMR LLC.
At present, the primary business activities of FMR LLC and its subsidiaries are: (i) the provision of investment advisory, management, shareholder, investment information and assistance and certain fiduciary services for individual and institutional investors; (ii) the provision of securities brokerage services; (iii) the management and development of real estate; and (iv) the investment in and operation of a number of emerging businesses.
FMR, FMR Investment Management (UK) Limited, Fidelity Management & Research (Hong Kong) Limited, Fidelity Management & Research (Japan) Limited, Fidelity Distributors Company LLC (FDC), and the funds have adopted a code of ethics under Rule 17j-1 of the 1940 Act that sets forth employees' fiduciary responsibilities regarding the funds, establishes procedures for personal investing, and restricts certain transactions. Employees subject to the code of ethics, including Fidelity investment personnel, may invest in securities for their own investment accounts, including securities that may be purchased or held by the funds.
MANAGEMENT CONTRACTS
Each fund has entered into a management contract with FMR, pursuant to which FMR furnishes investment advisory and other services.
Management Services. Under the terms of its management contract with each fund, FMR acts as investment adviser and, subject to the supervision of the Board of Trustees, has overall responsibility for directing the investments of the fund in accordance with its investment objective, policies and limitations. FMR also provides each fund with all necessary office facilities and personnel for servicing the fund's investments, compensates all officers of each fund and all Trustees who are interested persons of the trust or of FMR, and compensates all personnel of each fund or FMR performing services relating to research, statistical and investment activities.
In addition, FMR or its affiliates, subject to the supervision of the Board of Trustees, provide the management and administrative services necessary for the operation of each fund. These services include providing facilities for maintaining each fund's organization; supervising relations with custodians, transfer and pricing agents, accountants, underwriters and other persons dealing with each fund; preparing all general shareholder communications and conducting shareholder relations; maintaining each fund's records and the registration of each fund's shares under federal securities laws and making necessary filings under state securities laws; developing management and shareholder services for each fund; and furnishing reports, evaluations and analyses on a variety of subjects to the Trustees.
Management-Related Expenses. In addition to the management fee payable to FMR and the fees payable to the transfer agent and pricing and bookkeeping agent, and the costs associated with securities lending, as applicable, a fund or each class thereof, as applicable, pays all of its expenses that are not assumed by those parties. A fund pays for the typesetting, printing, and mailing of its proxy materials to shareholders, legal expenses, and the fees of the custodian, auditor, and Independent Trustees. A fund's management contract further provides that the fund will pay for typesetting, printing, and mailing prospectuses, statements of additional information, notices, and reports to shareholders. Other expenses paid by a fund include interest, taxes, brokerage commissions, fees and expenses associated with the fund's securities lending program, if applicable, the fund's proportionate share of insurance premiums and Investment Company Institute dues, and the costs of registering shares under federal securities laws and making necessary filings under state securities laws. A fund is also liable for such non-recurring expenses as may arise, including costs of any litigation to which the fund may be a party, and any obligation it may have to indemnify its officers and Trustees with respect to litigation.
Management Fees.
For the services of FMR under the management contract, each fund pays FMR a monthly management fee which has two components: a group fee rate and an individual fund fee rate.
The group fee rate is based on the monthly average net assets of a group of registered investment companies with which FMR has management contracts.
The following is the fee schedule for Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%:
GROUP FEE RATE SCHEDULE
 
 
 
EFFECTIVE ANNUAL FEE RATES
Average Group Assets
 
 
Annualized Rate
Group Net Assets
Effective Annual Fee Rate
0
-
$3 billion
.3700%
$1 billion
.3700%
3
-
6
.3400
50
.2188
6
-
9
.3100
100
.1869
9
-
12
.2800
150
.1736
12
-
15
.2500
200
.1652
15
-
18
.2200
250
.1587
18
-
21
.2000
300
.1536
21
-
24
.1900
350
.1494
24
-
30
.1800
400
.1459
30
-
36
.1750
450
.1427
36
-
42
.1700
500
.1399
42
-
48
.1650
550
.1372
48
-
66
.1600
600
.1349
66
-
84
.1550
650
.1328
84
-
120
.1500
700
.1309
120
-
156
.1450
750
.1291
156
-
192
.1400
800
.1275
192
-
228
.1350
850
.1260
228
-
264
.1300
900
.1246
264
-
300
.1275
950
.1233
300
-
336
.1250
1,000
.1220
336
-
372
.1225
1,050
.1209
372
-
408
.1200
1,100
.1197
408
-
444
.1175
1,150
.1187
444
-
480
.1150
1,200
.1177
480
-
516
.1125
1,250
.1167
516
-
587
.1100
1,300
.1158
587
-
646
.1080
1,350
.1149
646
-
711
.1060
1,400
.1141
711
-
782
.1040
1,450
.1132
782
-
860
.1020
1,500
.1125
860
-
946
.1000
1,550
.1117
946
-
1,041
.0980
1,600
.1110
1,041
-
1,145
.0960
1,650
.1103
1,145
-
1,260
.0940
1,700
.1096
1,260
-
1,386
.0920
1,750
.1089
1,386
-
1,525
.0900
1,800
.1083
1,525
-
1,677
.0880
1,850
.1077
1,677
-
1,845
.0860
1,900
.1070
1,845
-
2,030
.0840
1,950
.1065
Over
 
2,030
.0820
2,000
.1059
The group fee rate is calculated on a cumulative basis pursuant to the graduated fee rate schedule shown above on the left. The schedule above on the right shows the effective annual group fee rate at various asset levels, which is the result of cumulatively applying the annualized rates on the left. For example, the effective annual fee rate at $2,884 billion of group net assets - the approximate level for September 2022 - was 0.0986%, which is the weighted average of the respective fee rates for each level of group net assets up to $2,884 billion.
The following is the fee schedule for Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%, Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%, and Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%:
GROUP FEE RATE SCHEDULE
 
 
 
EFFECTIVE ANNUAL FEE RATES
Average Group Assets
 
 
Annualized Rate
Group Net Assets
Effective Annual Fee Rate
0
-
$3 billion
.5200%
$1 billion
.5200%
3
-
6
.4900
50
.3823
6
-
9
.4600
100
.3512
9
-
12
.4300
150
.3371
12
-
15
.4000
200
.3284
15
-
18
.3850
250
.3219
18
-
21
.3700
300
.3163
21
-
24
.3600
350
.3113
24
-
30
.3500
400
.3067
30
-
36
.3450
450
.3024
36
-
42
.3400
500
.2982
42
-
48
.3350
550
.2942
48
-
66
.3250
600
.2904
66
-
84
.3200
650
.2870
84
-
102
.3150
700
.2838
102
-
138
.3100
750
.2809
138
-
174
.3050
800
.2782
174
-
210
.3000
850
.2756
210
-
246
.2950
900
.2732
246
-
282
.2900
950
.2710
282
-
318
.2850
1,000
.2689
318
-
354
.2800
1,050
.2669
354
-
390
.2750
1,100
.2649
390
-
426
.2700
1,150
.2631
426
-
462
.2650
1,200
.2614
462
-
498
.2600
1,250
.2597
498
-
534
.2550
1,300
.2581
534
-
587
.2500
1,350
.2566
587
-
646
.2463
1,400
.2551
646
-
711
.2426
1,450
.2536
711
-
782
.2389
1,500
.2523
782
-
860
.2352
1,550
.2510
860
-
946
.2315
1,600
.2497
946
-
1,041
.2278
1,650
.2484
1,041
-
1,145
.2241
1,700
.2472
1,145
-
1,260
.2204
1,750
.2460
1,260
-
1,386
.2167
1,800
.2449
1,386
-
1,525
.2130
1,850
.2438
1,525
-
1,677
.2093
1,900
.2427
1,677
-
1,845
.2056
1,950
.2417
1,845
-
2,030
.2019
2,000
.2407
Over
 
2,030
.1982
2,050
.2397
The group fee rate is calculated on a cumulative basis pursuant to the graduated fee rate schedule shown above on the left. The schedule above on the right shows the effective annual group fee rate at various asset levels, which is the result of cumulatively applying the annualized rates on the left. For example, the effective annual fee rate at $2,884 billion of group net assets - the approximate level for September 2022 - was 0.2277%, which is the weighted average of the respective fee rates for each level of group net assets up to $2,884 billion.
The individual fund fee rate for each fund is set forth in the following table. Based on the average group net assets for September 2022, a fund's annual management fee rate would be calculated as follows:
Fund
Group Fee Rate
 
Individual Fund Fee Rate
 
Management Fee Rate
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
0.0986%
+
0.3000%
=
0.3986%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
0.0986%
+
0.3000%
=
0.3986%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
0.0986%
+
0.3000%
=
0.3986%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
0.2277%
+
0.2500%
=
0.4777%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
0.2277%
+
0.3000%
=
0.5277%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
0.2277%
+
0.3000%
=
0.5277%
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
0.2277%
+
0.3000%
=
0.5277%
One-twelfth of the management fee rate is applied to the fund's average net assets for the month, giving a dollar amount which is the fee for that month.
The following table shows the amount of management fees paid by a fund for the fiscal year(s) ended September 30, 2022, 2021, and 2020 to its current manager and prior affiliated manager(s), if any.
Fund(s)
Fiscal
Years
Ended
 
Management
Fees
Paid to
Investment Adviser
Fidelity Asset Manager® 20%
2022
$
24,997,393
 
2021
$
24,156,236
 
2020
$
21,301,463
Fidelity Asset Manager® 30%
2022
$
10,649,704
 
2021
$
10,064,501
 
2020
$
7,617,933
Fidelity Asset Manager® 40%
2022
$
9,930,335
 
2021
$
9,383,878
 
2020
$
7,697,667
Fidelity Asset Manager® 50%
2022
$
51,396,927
 
2021
$
52,351,755
 
2020
$
45,444,221
Fidelity Asset Manager® 60%
2022
$
21,869,544
 
2021
$
20,663,254
 
2020
$
16,795,031
Fidelity Asset Manager® 70%
2022
$
34,865,746
 
2021
$
34,265,502
 
2020
$
28,558,408
Fidelity Asset Manager® 85%
2022