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JOHCM EMERGING MARKETS DISCOVERY FUND
Institutional Shares (JOMMX)
Advisor Shares (JOMEX)
Investor Shares (Not currently offered)
Class Z Shares (Not currently offered)
JOHCM EMERGING MARKETS
OPPORTUNITIES FUND
Institutional Shares (JOEMX)
Advisor Shares (JOEIX)
Investor Shares (JOEAX)
Class Z Shares (Not currently offered)
JOHCM GLOBAL SELECT FUND
Institutional Shares (JOGIX)
Advisor Shares (JOGEX)
Investor Shares (Not currently offered)
Class Z Shares (Not currently offered)
JOHCM INTERNATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES FUND
Institutional Shares (JOPSX)
Advisor Shares (Not currently offered)
Investor Shares (Not currently offered)
Class Z Shares (Not currently offered)
JOHCM INTERNATIONAL SELECT FUND
Institutional Shares (JOHIX)
Investor Shares (JOHAX)
Class Z Shares (Not currently offered)
REGNAN GLOBAL EQUITY IMPACT SOLUTIONS
Institutional Shares (REGIX)
Advisor Shares (Not currently offered)
Investor Shares (Not currently offered)
Class Z Shares (Not currently offered)
 
REGNAN SUSTAINABLE WATER AND WASTE FUND
Institutional Shares (Not currently offered)
Advisor Shares (Not currently offered)
Investor Shares (Not currently offered)
Class Z Shares (Not currently offered)
PROSPECTUS DATED FEBRUARY 1, 2024
 
THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION HAS NOT APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
 
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FUND SUMMARY
JOHCM Emerging Markets Discovery Fund
Investment Objective
The investment objective of the JOHCM Emerging Markets Discovery Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
 
     Institutional
Shares
     Advisor
Shares
     Investor
Shares
     Class Z
Shares
 
Shareholder Fees (Fees paid directly from your investment)
           
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
     None        None        None        None  
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of net asset value)
     None        None        None        None  
Redemption Fee
     None        None        None        None  
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
           
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
           
Management Fee
     1.30%        1.30%        1.30%        1.30%  
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) Fees
     None        0.10%        0.25%        None  
Other Expenses
     0.57%        0.57%        0.57%        0.57%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
     1.87%        1.97%        2.12%        1.87%  
Fee Waivers and Reimbursements1
     0.38%        0.38%        0.38%        0.38%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Reimbursements
     1.49%        1.59%        1.74%        1.49%  
 
1 
JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) exceed 1.49%, 1.59%, 1.74%, and 1.49% for Institutional Shares, Advisor Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, until February 1, 2025. If it becomes unnecessary for the Adviser to waive fees or make reimbursements, the Adviser may recapture any of its prior waivers or reimbursements for a period not to exceed three years from the date on which the waiver or reimbursement was made to the extent that such a recapture does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) to exceed the current expense limitation or the applicable expense limitation that was in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement. The agreement to waive fees and reimburse expenses may be terminated by the Board of Trustees at any time and will terminate automatically upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement.
 
1

Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that each year your investment has a 5% return and Fund operating expenses remain the same. The contractual expense limitation for the Fund is reflected only in the 1 year example and for the first year of the 3, 5 and 10 year examples. Although your actual costs and returns might be different, your approximate costs of investing $10,000 in the Fund would be:
 
     1 year      3 years      5 years      10 years  
Institutional Shares
   $ 152      $ 551        $976      $ 2,159  
Advisor Shares
   $ 162      $ 582        $1,027      $ 2,265  
Investor Shares
   $ 177      $ 627        $1,104      $ 2,422  
Class Z Shares
   $ 152      $ 551        $976      $ 2,159  
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recently completed fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate of the Fund was 155.29% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities issued by companies located in emerging markets, including frontier markets. Equity securities include common and preferred stocks, and include rights and warrants to subscribe to common stock or other equity securities. The Fund may achieve its equity exposure either directly or indirectly, such as through depositary receipts, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and participatory notes (commonly known as “P-notes”). Emerging market countries are those countries included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index and MSCI Frontier Markets Index, countries with low to middle-income economies according to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (more commonly referred to as the World Bank), and other countries with similar emerging market characteristics.
The portfolio managers seek to identify growth potential in companies that they believe are recovering (or will soon begin to recover) from market or business setbacks and therefore have the potential to outpace broader financial markets on a relative basis. Setbacks are company-, country- or sector-specific developments, which result in a negative market environment for a company’s business or the trading of its stock. Setbacks can include, among other things, failed product launches, supply chain issues, and economic or geopolitical instability in an emerging market country. In identifying those companies that they believe have the potential for recovery, the portfolio managers often seek companies with improving fundamentals and/or are taking actions to address recent or ongoing setbacks.
The portfolio managers primarily use a disciplined fundamental bottom-up research approach, namely by focusing on analyzing individual companies. As part of this approach, the portfolio managers aim to identify emerging market companies that they believe are inefficiently priced and that typically demonstrate positive growth characteristics. As part of the selection process for its “discovery” strategy, the portfolio managers typically look for companies that are: (a) in emerging industries with pioneering business models, or (b) have innovative technologies that have the potential to disrupt the status quo, or (c) are offering products or services that are not yet widely available or adopted in the local market, with the potential for long-term growth.
 
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While the portfolio managers build the Fund’s portfolio primarily from a bottom-up growth philosophy and individual stock selection process they also consider top-down macroeconomic information, particularly in determining sector and country weightings in the portfolio. The portfolio managers consider the country and sector allocation of the Fund’s performance benchmark (the MSCI Emerging Markets Small Cap Index) but may depart from the benchmark’s allocations at any time. In selecting companies for investment, the portfolio managers also consider the investment risks associated with the liquidity of the company’s stock, taking into account the depth of the trading market for the company’s shares, and how reliable the company’s reporting (particularly its financial reporting) appears to be while also seeking to take advantage of market inefficiencies as to individual companies and industries.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund will typically hold securities of 70 to 120 companies and will invest at least 80% of its assets in small and medium capitalization companies, which the Fund currently considers to be companies with market capitalizations below U.S. $8 billion. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in issuers located in one country or a small number of countries. These countries may change from time to time. While the Fund does not pursue active or frequent trading as a principal strategy, the nature of the portfolio frequently results in higher levels of portfolio turnover (in excess of 100% of the average value of its portfolio on an annualized basis) when the portfolio managers implement their strategy in certain economic and market conditions.
The Fund expects to invest a portion of its assets in securities of developed markets companies that derive, or are expected to derive, a significant portion of their revenues from their operations in emerging or frontier markets. The Fund may also participate in initial public offerings (“IPO“s).
The Fund also may purchase futures contracts and other derivative contracts, including index derivatives for equities and currencies. Although the Fund did not invest significantly in derivatives instruments as of the most recent fiscal year end, it may do so at any time. The Fund also may invest in physical currencies and spot and forward currency contracts. The Fund typically does not seek to hedge its exposure to non-U.S. dollar currencies.
Principal Investment Risks
All investments carry a certain amount of risk, and the Fund cannot guarantee that it will achieve its investment objective. The value of the Fund’s investments will fluctuate with market conditions, and the value of your investment in the Fund also will vary. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could perform worse than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not deposits of a bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any other government agency. Below are the principal risks of investing in the Fund. All of the risks listed below are material to the Fund, regardless of the order in which they appear. The Fund should only be purchased by investors seeking long-term growth of capital who can withstand the share price volatility of equity investing with a focus on emerging market stocks.
Equity Securities Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting issuers, industries, or financial markets in which the Fund invests will impact the value of the stocks held by the Fund and thus, the value of the Fund’s shares over short or extended periods.
Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk. The small- and mid-capitalization companies in which the Fund invests in may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, these small- and mid-capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets, and financial resources, and may depend upon relatively small management groups. Therefore, small- and mid-capitalization stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies.
Non-U.S. Securities Risk. Investing in non-U.S. securities poses additional market risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers and may not affect the
 
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U.S. economy or U.S. issuers. In addition, issuers of non-U.S. securities often are not subject to as much regulation as U.S. issuers, and the reporting, accounting, custody, and auditing standards to which those issuers are subject often are not as rigorous as U.S. standards. Investments in non-U.S. securities may also be subject to greater environmental, credit and information risks. The Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities also are subject to non-U.S. currency fluctuations and other non-U.S. currency-related risks. Non-U.S. securities may be subject to higher volatility than U.S. securities, varying degrees of regulation and limited liquidity.
ETF Risk. Shareholders of the Fund will indirectly be subject to the fees and expenses of the individual ETFs in which the Fund invests. In addition, an ETF may not replicate exactly the performance of the benchmark index it seeks to track for a number of reasons, including transaction costs incurred by the ETF, the temporary unavailability of certain index securities in the secondary market or discrepancies between the ETF and the index with respect to the weighting of securities or the number of securities held.
Emerging Markets Risk. In addition to the risks of investing in non-U.S. investments generally, emerging markets investments are subject to greater risks arising from political or economic instability, nationalization or confiscatory taxation, currency exchange restrictions, sanctions by other countries (such as the United States) and an issuer’s unwillingness or inability to make principal or interest payments on its obligations. Emerging markets companies may be smaller and have shorter operating histories than companies in developed markets. To the extent a Fund invests in frontier countries, these risks will be magnified. Frontier countries generally have smaller economies or less developed capital markets than traditional emerging market countries.
Geographic Focus Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting the fiscal stability of a particular country or region in which the Fund focuses its investments will cause the value of the Fund’s shares to decrease, perhaps significantly. To the extent the Fund focuses its assets in a particular country or region, the Fund is more vulnerable to financial, economic, or other political developments in that country or region as compared to a fund that does not focus on holdings in a particular country or region. As a result, the Fund may be more volatile than a fund which is broadly diversified geographically.
Currency Risk. Investments in non-U.S. countries are also subject to currency risk. As the Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities are generally denominated in non-U.S. currencies, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect the value of the Fund’s investments. Some of the currencies in emerging markets have experienced devaluations relative to the U.S. dollar, and major adjustments have been made periodically in certain such currencies. Certain developing countries face serious exchange constraints.
Active Management Risk. The Adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value, and potential appreciation of a particular asset class or individual security in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect and there is no guarantee that individual securities will perform as anticipated. Any given investment strategy may fail to produce the intended results, and a Fund’s portfolio may underperform other comparable funds because of portfolio management decisions related to, among other things, the selection of investments, portfolio construction, evaluation of an issuer’s corporate governance practices, risk assessments, and/or the outlook on market trends and opportunities.
Convertible Securities Risk. Convertible securities are hybrid securities that have characteristics of both fixed income and equity securities and are subject to risks associated with both fixed income and equity securities.
Investment Company Risk. Shareholders in the Fund will indirectly bear fees and expenses charged by the underlying investment companies in which the Fund invests in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. Investments in other funds also may increase the amount of taxes payable by investors in the Fund.
Participatory Notes Risk. P-notes, which are designed to replicate the performance of certain issuers and markets where direct investment is either impossible or difficult due to local restrictions, represent interest in securities listed on certain non-U.S. exchanges, and thus present similar risks to investing directly in such securities. P-
 
4

notes also expose investors to counterparty risk, which is risk that the entity issuing the note may not be able to honor its financial commitments. The liquidity of a P-note reflects the liquidity in the underlying security. At times, it may be more illiquid than trading the underlying security as broker selection is restricted to the underwriter of the P-note.
Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts may be sponsored or unsponsored. Although the two types of depositary receipt facilities are similar, there are differences regarding a holder’s rights and obligations and the practices of market participants. Holders of unsponsored depositary receipts generally bear all the costs of the facility. The depositary usually charges fees upon the deposit and withdrawal of the underlying securities, the conversion of dividends into U.S. dollars or other currency, the disposition of non-cash distributions, and the performance of other services. The depositary of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the underlying issuer or to pass through voting rights with respect to the underlying securities to depositary receipt holders.
Portfolio Turnover Risk. The Fund may sell its portfolio securities, regardless of the length of time that they have been held, if the Adviser determines that it would be in the Fund’s best interest to do so. These transactions will increase the Fund’s “portfolio turnover.” High turnover rates generally result in higher brokerage costs to the Fund and higher amounts of taxable distributions to shareholders.
Regulatory Risk. Changes in the laws or regulations of the United States or other countries, including changes to applicable tax laws and regulations, could impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective and could increase the operating expenses of the Fund.
Derivatives Risk. The Fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index.
Growth Investing Risk. The prices of growth stocks may be based largely on expectations of future earnings, and their prices can decline rapidly and significantly in reaction to negative news. Growth stocks may underperform stocks in other broad style categories (and the stock market as a whole) over a short or long period of time and may shift in and out of favor with investors generally, sometimes rapidly, depending on changes in market, economic, and other factors.
Market Risk. The market value of the Fund’s investments will move up and down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based upon overall market and economic conditions, as well as a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuers of the Fund’s investments, such as management performance, financial condition and demand for the issuers’ goods and services.
Performance Information
The bar chart and performance table below provide an indication of the risks of an investment in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year, and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance reflects contractual fee waivers in effect. If fee waivers were not in place, performance would be reduced. For periods prior to the reorganization of the Fund, in which a predecessor fund was merged into the Fund, the performance information is based on the performance of the predecessor fund. Historical performance for Advisor Shares prior to its inception is based on the performance of the Institutional Shares. The performance of Advisor Shares has been adjusted to reflect differences in expenses. After-tax returns are shown for Institutional Shares only and will vary from the after-tax returns for other share classes. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual
 
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after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by calling 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913.
Annual Total Returns – Institutional Shares for year ended December 31*
LOGO
 
Best quarter:
     04/01/2020 – 06/30/2020 – 30.15%  
Worst quarter:
     01/01/2020 – 03/31/2020 – (25.59%)  
 
*
The Fund’s fiscal year end is September 30. The Fund’s most recent quarterly return (since the end of the last fiscal year) through December 31, 2023 was 8.34%.
Average Annual Total Returns – for the Periods Ended December 31, 2023
 
     1 Year     5 Years     Since
Inception^
 
Institutional Shares – Before Taxes
     24.89     11.89     9.59
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions
     24.72     9.96     7.81
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
     15.04     9.12     7.27
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
MSCI Emerging Markets Small Cap Index (reflects no deductions for fees or expenses)*
     23.92     9.92     6.19
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Advisor Shares – Before Taxes
     24.71     11.80     9.50
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
^
The Institutional Shares of the Fund’s predecessor fund commenced operations on December 17, 2014. Advisor Shares commenced operations on January 28, 2016.
*
Index returns shown are net of withholding taxes.
Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser
The Fund’s investment adviser is JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”).
Portfolio Managers
 
Emery Brewer   
Dr. Ivo Kovachev
  
Stephen Lew
Senior Fund Manager   
Senior Fund Manager
  
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2014*   
Length of Service: Since 2014*
  
Length of Service: Since 2014*
 
*
Each Portfolio Manager served as portfolio manager of the Fund’s predecessor, which reorganized into the Trust on July 19, 2021.
 
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Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Initial Investment
 
Institutional    Advisor    Investor    Class Z
$100,000
   No minimum    No minimum    $10,000,000
There is no minimum for additional investments. If you hold shares through a financial intermediary, the financial intermediary may impose its own, different, investment minimums.
To Buy or Sell Shares:
Perpetual Americas Funds Trust
c/o The Northern Trust Company
P.O. Box 4766
Chicago, IL 60680-4766
Telephone: 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913
You can buy or sell shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open through your broker or financial intermediary, or by mail or telephone. You can pay for shares by wire. The Adviser and Perpetual Americas Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, reserve the right to waive any minimum in their sole discretion, and to reject any purchase order for any reason.
Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes
The Fund intends to make distributions that are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k), or other tax-advantaged investment plan. However, you may be subject to tax when you withdraw monies from a tax-advantaged plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s web site for more information.
 
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FUND SUMMARY
JOHCM Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund
Investment Objective
The investment objective of the JOHCM Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
 
     Institutional
Shares
     Advisor
Shares
     Investor
Shares
     Class Z
Shares
 
Shareholder Fees (Fees paid directly from your investment)
           
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
     None        None        None        None  
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of net asset value)
     None        None        None        None  
Redemption Fee
     None        None        None        None  
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
           
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
           
Management Fee
     0.90%        0.90%        0.90%        0.90%  
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) Fees
     None        0.10%        0.25%        None  
Other Expenses
     0.14%        0.12%        0.12%        0.12%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses1
     1.04%        1.12%        1.27%        1.02%  
 
1 
JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) exceed 1.04%, 1.14%, 1.29%, and 1.04% for Institutional Shares, Advisor Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, until February 1, 2025. If it becomes unnecessary for the Adviser to waive fees or make reimbursements, the Adviser may recapture any of its prior waivers or reimbursements for a period not to exceed three years from the date on which the waiver or reimbursement was made to the extent that such a recapture does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) to exceed the current expense limitation or the applicable expense limitation that was in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement. The agreement to waive fees and reimburse expenses may be terminated by the Board of Trustees at any time and will terminate automatically upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that each
 
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year your investment has a 5% return and Fund operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs and returns might be different, your approximate costs of investing $10,000 in the Fund would be:
 
     1 year      3 years      5 years      10 years  
Institutional Shares
   $ 106      $ 331      $ 574      $ 1,271  
Advisor Shares
   $ 114      $ 356      $ 617      $ 1,363  
Investor Shares
   $ 129      $ 403      $ 697      $ 1,534  
Class Z Shares
   $ 104      $ 325      $ 563      $ 1,248  
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recently completed fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate of the Fund was 29.34% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities of companies located in emerging market countries. Emerging market countries are those countries included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index and MSCI Frontier Markets Index, countries with low to middle-income economies according to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (more commonly referred to as the World Bank) and other countries with similar emerging market characteristics. The Fund may invest in companies of any size, including small- and mid-capitalization companies. The Fund may also invest up to 5% of its assets in frontier markets, which are generally smaller, less liquid, and less developed than emerging markets.
The equity securities in the Fund’s portfolio can include direct and indirect investments in common and preferred stocks, as well as rights and warrants to subscribe to equity securities. The Fund obtains indirect exposure to equity securities through instruments such as depositary receipts and participatory notes. Depositary receipts, such as American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) are receipts issued by a bank or trust company evidencing ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign issuer. Depositary receipts are alternatives to directly purchasing the underlying foreign securities in their national markets and currencies.
The Fund utilizes a core investment style with a modest growth tilt (growth at a reasonable price, or “GARP”) over all capitalization ranges to invest in equity securities of companies located in emerging markets. The GARP investment strategy is a blend of growth and value investing, which seeks to find companies that have strong earnings growth at a good price. The Fund combines top-down and bottom-up research to assess potential investments in the Fund. A top-down country view represents an assessment of the investment prospects in a country (in this case, a particular emerging market country) based on macroeconomic, geopolitical and other factors affecting the country as a whole. The portfolio managers seek to invest in companies that possess attractive fundamentals (for example, a company’s revenues, earnings, or management) and that fit with the portfolio managers top-down country views within the emerging markets. The portfolio is managed with reference to its performance benchmark, the MSCI Emerging Markets Index, as to country and sector allocation but may depart from the benchmark’s allocations at any time. The Fund will typically own between 40 and 60 companies.
The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in investments located in one country or a small number of countries. These countries may change from time to time. The Fund’s performance benchmark index currently includes substantial exposure to China.
The Fund may also participate in initial public offerings (“IPO”s).
 
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Principal Investment Risks
All investments carry a certain amount of risk, and the Fund cannot guarantee that it will achieve its investment objective. The value of the Fund’s investments will fluctuate with market conditions, and the value of your investment in the Fund also will vary. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could perform worse than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not deposits of a bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any other government agency. The Fund should only be purchased by investors seeking long-term growth of capital who can withstand the share price volatility of equity investing with a focus on emerging market stocks. Below are the principal risks of investing in the Fund. All of the risks listed below are material to the Fund, regardless of the order in which they appear.
Non-U.S. Securities Risk. Investing in non-U.S. securities poses additional market risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers and may not affect the U.S. economy or U.S. issuers. In addition, issuers of non-U.S. securities often are not subject to as much regulation as U.S. issuers, and the reporting, accounting, custody, and auditing standards to which those issuers are subject often are not as rigorous as U.S. standards. Investments in non-U.S. securities may also be subject to greater environmental, credit and information risks. The Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities also are subject to non-U.S. currency fluctuations and other non-U.S. currency-related risks. Non-U.S. securities may be subject to higher volatility than U.S. securities, varying degrees of regulation and limited liquidity.
Emerging Markets Risk. In addition to the risks of investing in non-U.S. investments generally, emerging markets investments are subject to greater risks arising from political or economic instability, nationalization or confiscatory taxation, currency exchange restrictions, sanctions by other countries (such as the United States) and an issuer’s unwillingness or inability to make principal or interest payments on its obligations. Emerging markets companies may be smaller and have shorter operating histories than companies in developed markets. To the extent a Fund invests in frontier countries, these risks will be magnified. Frontier countries generally have smaller economies or less developed capital markets than traditional emerging market countries.
Currency Risk. Investments in non-U.S. countries are also subject to currency risk. As the Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities are generally denominated in non-U.S. currencies, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect the value of the Fund’s investments. Some of the currencies in emerging markets have experienced devaluations relative to the U.S. dollar, and major adjustments have been made periodically in certain such currencies. Certain developing countries face serious exchange constraints.
Equity Securities Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting issuers, industries or financial markets in which the Fund invests will impact the value of the stocks held by the Fund and thus, the value of the Fund’s shares over short or extended periods.
Active Management Risk. The Adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value, and potential appreciation of a particular asset class or individual security in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect, and there is no guarantee that individual securities will perform as anticipated. Any given investment strategy may fail to produce the intended results, and a Fund’s portfolio may underperform other comparable funds because of portfolio management decisions related to, among other things, the selection of investments, portfolio construction, evaluation of an issuer’s corporate governance practices, risk assessments, and/or the outlook on market trends and opportunities.
Geographic Focus Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting the fiscal stability of a particular country or region in which the Fund focuses its investments will cause the value of the Fund’s shares to decrease, perhaps significantly. To the extent the Fund focuses its assets in a particular country or region, the Fund is more vulnerable to financial, economic, or other political developments in that country or region as compared to a fund that does not focus on holdings in a particular country or region. As a result, the Fund may be more volatile than a fund which is broadly diversified geographically.
China Risk. To the extent a Fund invests in securities of Chinese issuers, it may be subject to certain risks and considerations not typically associated with investing in securities of U.S. issuers, including, among others, more frequent trading suspensions and government interventions (including by nationalization of assets), currency
 
10

exchange rate fluctuations or blockages, limits on the use of brokers and on non-U.S. ownership, variable interest entities risks, different financial reporting standards, higher dependence on exports and international trade, potential for increased trade tariffs, embargoes and other trade limitations, and custody risks.
Growth Investing Risk. The prices of growth stocks may be based largely on expectations of future earnings, and their prices can decline rapidly and significantly in reaction to negative news. Growth stocks may underperform stocks in other broad style categories (and the stock market as a whole) over a short or long period of time and may shift in and out of favor with investors generally, sometimes rapidly, depending on changes in market, economic, and other factors.
GARP Investment Strategy Risk. GARP investing involves buying stocks that have a reasonable price/earnings ratio in relationship to the relevant company’s earnings growth rate. To the extent the Fund uses a GARP investing strategy, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected when stocks preferred by a GARP investing strategy underperform or are not favored by investors in prevailing market and economic conditions.
Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk. The small- and mid-capitalization companies in which the Fund invests in may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, these small- and mid-capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets, and financial resources, and may depend upon relatively small management groups. Therefore, small- and mid-capitalization stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies.
Participatory Notes Risk. P-notes, which are designed to replicate the performance of certain issuers and markets where direct investment is either impossible or difficult due to local restrictions, represent interest in securities listed on certain non-U.S. exchanges, and thus present similar risks to investing directly in such securities. P-notes also expose investors to counterparty risk, which is risk that the entity issuing the note may not be able to honor its financial commitments. The liquidity of a P-note reflects the liquidity in the underlying security. At times, it may be more illiquid than trading the underlying security as broker selection is restricted to the underwriter of the P-note.
Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts may be sponsored or unsponsored. Although the two types of depositary receipt facilities are similar, there are differences regarding a holder’s rights and obligations and the practices of market participants. Holders of unsponsored depositary receipts generally bear all the costs of the facility. The depositary usually charges fees upon the deposit and withdrawal of the underlying securities, the conversion of dividends into U.S. dollars or other currency, the disposition of non-cash distributions, and the performance of other services. The depositary of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the underlying issuer or to pass through voting rights with respect to the underlying securities to depositary receipt holders.
Regulatory Risk. Changes in the laws or regulations of the United States or other countries, including changes to applicable tax laws and regulations, could impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective and could increase the operating expenses of the Fund.
IPO Risk. The Fund may purchase securities in IPOs. These securities are subject to many of the same risks of investing in companies with smaller market capitalizations. Securities issued in IPOs have no trading history, and information about the companies may be available for very limited periods. In addition, the prices of securities sold in IPOs may be highly volatile.
Value Investing Risk. Value securities are securities of companies that may have experienced adverse business, industry, or other developments or may be subject to special risks that have caused the securities to be out of favor and, in turn, potentially undervalued. It may take longer than expected for the value of such securities to rise to the anticipated value, or the value may never do so.
Market Risk. The market value of the Fund’s investments will move up and down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based upon overall market and economic conditions, as well as a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuers of the Fund’s investments, such as management performance, financial condition and demand for the issuers’ goods and services.
 
11

Performance Information
The bar chart and performance table below provide an indication of the risks of an investment in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year, and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance reflects contractual fee waivers in effect. If fee waivers were not in place, performance would be reduced. For periods prior to the reorganization of the Fund, in which a predecessor fund was merged into the Fund, the performance information is based on the performance of the predecessor fund. Historical performance for Investor Shares prior to its inception is based on the performance of Advisor Shares, the share class most similar to Investor. The performance of Investor Shares has been adjusted to reflect differences in expenses. After-tax returns are shown for Institutional Shares only and will vary from the after-tax returns for other share classes. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by calling 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913.
Annual Total Returns – Institutional Shares for year ended December 31*
LOGO
 
Best quarter:
     04/01/2020 – 06/30/2020 – 20.95%  
Worst quarter:
     01/01/2020 – 03/31/2020 – (24.46%)  
 
*
The Fund’s fiscal year end is September 30. The Fund’s most recent quarterly return (since the end of the last fiscal year) through December 31, 2023 was 6.54%.
Average Annual Total Returns – for the Periods Ended December 31, 2023
 
     1 Year     5 Years     10 Years     Since
Inception^
 
Institutional Shares – Before Taxes
     7.16     4.20     3.17     3.78
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions
     6.94     3.67     2.32     3.01
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
     4.77     3.36     2.33     2.86
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
MSCI Emerging Markets Index (reflects no deductions for fees or expenses)*
     9.83     3.68     2.66     2.85
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Advisor Shares – Before Taxes
     7.04     4.10     3.08     3.69
Investor Shares – Before Taxes
     6.84     3.94     2.94     3.55
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
^
The Institutional Shares and Advisor Shares of the Fund’s predecessor fund commenced operations on November 21, 2012. Investor Shares commenced operations on December 18, 2013.
*
Index returns shown are net of withholding taxes.
 
12

Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser
The Fund’s investment adviser is JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”).
Portfolio Managers
 
James Syme, CFA    Paul Wimborne    Ada Chan
Senior Fund Manager    Senior Fund Manager    Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2013*    Length of Service: Since 2013*    Length of Service: Since 2022
 
*
Served as portfolio manager of the Fund’s predecessor, which reorganized into the Trust on July 19, 2021.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Initial Investment
 
Institutional    Advisor    Investor    Class Z
$100,000
   No minimum    No minimum    $10,000,000
There is no minimum for additional investments. If you hold shares through a financial intermediary, the financial intermediary may impose its own, different, investment minimums.
To Buy or Sell Shares:
Perpetual Americas Funds Trust
c/o The Northern Trust Company
P.O. Box 4766
Chicago, IL 60680-4766
Telephone: 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913
You can buy or sell shares of the Fund on any day that the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open through your broker or financial intermediary, or by mail or telephone. You can pay for shares by wire. The Adviser and Perpetual Americas Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, reserve the right to waive any minimum in their sole discretion, and to reject any purchase order for any reason.
Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes
The Fund intends to make distributions that are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k), or other tax-advantaged investment plan. However, you may be subject to tax when you withdraw monies from a tax-advantaged plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s web site for more information.
 
13

FUND SUMMARY
JOHCM Global Select Fund
Investment Objective
The investment objective of the JOHCM Global Select Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
 
     Institutional
Shares
     Advisor
Shares
     Investor
Shares
     Class Z
Shares
 
Shareholder Fees (Fees paid directly from your investment)
           
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
     None        None        None        None  
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of net asset value)
     None        None        None        None  
Redemption Fee
     None        None        None        None  
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
           
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
           
Management Fee
     0.89%        0.89%        0.89%        0.89%  
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) Fees
     None        0.10%        0.25%        None  
Other Expenses
     0.13%        0.13%        0.13%        0.13%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
     1.02%        1.12%        1.27%        1.02%  
Fee Waivers and Reimbursements1
     -0.03%        -0.03%        -0.03%        -0.03%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Reimbursements
     0.99%        1.09%        1.24%        0.99%  
 
1 
JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.98%, 1.08%, 1.23%, and 0.98% for Institutional Shares, Advisor Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, until February 1, 2025. If it becomes unnecessary for the Adviser to waive fees or make reimbursements, the Adviser may recapture any of its prior waivers or reimbursements for a period not to exceed three years from the date on which the waiver or reimbursement was made to the extent that such a recapture does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) to exceed the current expense limitation or the applicable expense limitation that was in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement. The agreement to waive fees and reimburse expenses may be terminated by the Board of Trustees at any time and will terminate automatically upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement. Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Reimbursements may exceed 0.98%, 1.08%, 1.23%, and 0.98% for Institutional Shares, Advisor Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, due to certain excluded expenses.
 
14

Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that each year your investment has a 5% return and Fund operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs and returns might be different, your approximate costs of investing $10,000 in the Fund would be:
 
     1 year      3 years      5 years      10 years  
Institutional Shares
   $ 101      $ 322      $ 560      $ 1,245  
Advisor Shares
   $ 111      $ 353      $ 614      $ 1,360  
Investor Shares
   $ 126      $ 400      $ 694      $ 1,531  
Class Z Shares
   $ 101      $ 322      $ 560      $ 1,245  
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recently completed fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate of the Fund was 42.65% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in common stocks and other equity securities of U.S. and non-U.S. companies, including in preferred stock, rights, and warrants. The Fund normally invests at least 40% of its assets in companies located in countries other than the U.S., provided that the Fund reserves the flexibility to invest as little as 30% of its assets in companies located outside the U.S. when market conditions are unfavorable. Notwithstanding the previous sentence, the Fund may invest a percentage lower than 40% in such non-U.S. securities if the weighting of non-U.S. securities in the Fund’s performance benchmark (currently, the MSCI ACWI Index) drops below 45%, in which case the minimum level investments in non-U.S. securities must remain within 5% of the benchmark’s weighting (e.g. if the weighting of non-U.S. securities in the Fund’s performance benchmark is 38%, the minimum level for investing in non-U.S. securities for the Fund would be 33%). Typically, the Fund invests in a number of different countries, including emerging markets. The Fund may invest in companies of any size, including small- and mid-capitalization companies, in order to achieve its objective.
The portfolio managers seek to identify and make investments based on a multi-dimensional investment process, considering a number of factors, including growth, valuation, size, momentum, and beta. Beta measures the volatility of a stock relative to the overall market. The Fund utilizes a core investment style with a growth tilt (growth at a reasonable price, or “GARP”) over all capitalization ranges, which means that the Fund generally invests in larger, more established companies, but would expect to invest a somewhat greater portion of its assets in smaller, growth companies than would a typical large cap mutual fund. The GARP investment strategy is a blend of growth and value investing and seeks to find companies that have strong earnings growth at a good price. The Fund seeks those stocks, sectors, and countries with the potential to cause positive earnings surprises, with sustainably high or increasing return on equity, and with attractive valuations. The investment process utilizes a combination of bottom-up investing and top-down asset allocation that typically results in a portfolio of 30 to 60 holdings. Bottom-up investing utilizes techniques such as fundamental analysis to assess growth and value potential of individual issuers. In conducting fundamental analysis of companies that are being considered for purchase by the Fund, the portfolio managers evaluate, among other things, the financial condition and management of a company, its industry, stability of the country in which the company is located, and the interrelationship of these variables over time.
 
15

Top-down asset allocation utilizes evaluations of, among other things, economic factors including country risk, sector trends within individual countries and regions, and currency impact.
Investments are predominantly in common stock, however the Fund also expects to gain some of its equity exposure indirectly, such as through purchasing depositary receipts, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and/or participatory notes. Participatory notes (commonly known as “P-notes”) are instruments that provide exposure to, primarily, equity securities of issuers listed on a non-U.S. exchange and are typically used when a direct investment in the underlying security is either unpermitted, restricted or uneconomical due to country-specific regulations or other restrictions.
Principal Investment Risks
All investments carry a certain amount of risk, and the Fund cannot guarantee that it will achieve its investment objective. The value of the Fund’s investments will fluctuate with market conditions, and the value of your investment in the Fund also will vary. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could perform worse than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not deposits of a bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any other government agency. Below are the principal risks of investing in the Fund. All of the risks listed below are material to the Fund, regardless of the order in which they appear. The Fund should only be purchased by investors seeking long-term growth of capital who can withstand the share price volatility of equity investing with a focus on global stocks.
Equity Securities Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting issuers, industries, or financial markets in which the Fund invests will impact the value of the stocks held by the Fund and thus, the value of the Fund’s shares over short or extended periods.
Non-U.S. Securities Risk. Investing in non-U.S. securities poses additional market risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers and may not affect the U.S. economy or U.S. issuers. In addition, issuers of non-U.S. securities often are not subject to as much regulation as U.S. issuers, and the reporting, accounting, custody, and auditing standards to which those issuers are subject often are not as rigorous as U.S. standards. Investments in non-U.S. securities may also be subject to greater environmental, credit and information risks. The Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities also are subject to non-U.S. currency fluctuations and other non-U.S. currency-related risks. Non-U.S. securities may be subject to higher volatility than U.S. securities, varying degrees of regulation and limited liquidity.
Emerging Markets Risk. In addition to the risks of investing in non-U.S. investments generally, emerging markets investments are subject to greater risks arising from political or economic instability, nationalization or confiscatory taxation, currency exchange restrictions, sanctions by other countries (such as the United States) and an issuer’s unwillingness or inability to make principal or interest payments on its obligations. Emerging markets companies may be smaller and have shorter operating histories than companies in developed markets. To the extent a Fund invests in frontier countries, these risks will be magnified. Frontier countries generally have smaller economies or less developed capital markets than traditional emerging market countries.
ETF Risk. Shareholders of the Fund will indirectly be subject to the fees and expenses of the individual ETFs in which the Fund invests. In addition, an ETF may not replicate exactly the performance of the benchmark index it seeks to track for a number of reasons, including transaction costs incurred by the ETF, the temporary unavailability of certain index securities in the secondary market or discrepancies between the ETF and the index with respect to the weighting of securities or the number of securities held.
Active Management Risk. The Adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value, and potential appreciation of a particular asset class or individual security in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect, and there is no guarantee that individual securities will perform as anticipated. Any given investment strategy may fail to produce the intended results, and a Fund’s portfolio may underperform other comparable funds because of
 
16

portfolio management decisions related to, among other things, the selection of investments, portfolio construction, evaluation of an issuer’s corporate governance practices, risk assessments, and/or the outlook on market trends and opportunities.
Growth Investing Risk. The prices of growth stocks may be based largely on expectations of future earnings, and their prices can decline rapidly and significantly in reaction to negative news. Growth stocks may underperform stocks in other broad style categories (and the stock market as a whole) over a short or long period of time and may shift in and out of favor with investors generally, sometimes rapidly, depending on changes in market, economic, and other factors.
GARP Investment Strategy Risk. GARP investing involves buying stocks that the portfolio managers believe have reasonable price/earnings ratios in relation to the relevant company’s current or expected future earnings growth rate. To the extent the Fund uses a GARP investing strategy, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected when stocks preferred by a GARP investing strategy underperform or are not favored by investors in prevailing market and economic conditions.
Preferred Stock Risk. The value of preferred stocks will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of preferred stock. Preferred stocks are also subject to credit risk, which is the possibility that an issuer of preferred stock will fail to make its dividend payments.
Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk. The small- and mid-capitalization companies in which the Fund invests in may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, these small- and mid-capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets and financial resources, and may depend upon relatively small management groups. Therefore, small- and mid-capitalization stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies.
Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts may be sponsored or unsponsored. Although the two types of depositary receipt facilities are similar, there are differences regarding a holder’s rights and obligations and the practices of market participants. Holders of unsponsored depositary receipts generally bear all the costs of the facility. The depositary usually charges fees upon the deposit and withdrawal of the underlying securities, the conversion of dividends into U.S. dollars or other currency, the disposition of non-cash distributions, and the performance of other services. The depositary of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the underlying issuer or to pass through voting rights with respect to the underlying securities to depositary receipt holders.
Participatory Notes Risk. P-notes, which are designed to replicate the performance of certain issuers and markets where direct investment is either impossible or difficult due to local restrictions, represent interest in securities listed on certain non-U.S. exchanges, and thus present similar risks to investing directly in such securities. P‑notes also expose investors to counterparty risk, which is risk that the entity issuing the note may not be able to honor its financial commitments. The liquidity of a P-note reflects the liquidity in the underlying security. At times, it may be more illiquid than trading the underlying security as broker selection is restricted to the underwriter of the P-note.
Regulatory Risk. Changes in the laws or regulations of the United States or other countries, including changes to applicable tax laws and regulations, could impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective and could increase the operating expenses of the Fund.
Value Investing Risk. Value securities are securities of companies that may have experienced adverse business, industry, or other developments or may be subject to special risks that have caused the securities to be out of favor and, in turn, potentially undervalued. It may take longer than expected for the value of such securities to rise to the anticipated value, or the value may never do so.
 
17

Market Risk. The market value of the Fund’s investments will move up and down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based upon overall market and economic conditions, as well as a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuers of the Fund’s investments, such as management performance, financial condition and demand for the issuers’ goods and services.
Performance Information
The bar chart and performance table below provide an indication of the risks of an investment in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year, and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance reflects contractual fee waivers in effect. If fee waivers were not in place, performance would be reduced. For periods prior to the reorganization of the Fund, in which a predecessor fund was merged into the Fund, the performance information is based on the performance of the predecessor fund. After-tax returns are shown for Institutional Shares only and will vary from the after-tax returns for other share classes. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by calling 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913.
Annual Total Returns – Institutional Shares for year ended December 31*
LOGO
 
Best quarter:
     04/01/2020 – 06/30/2020 – 25.06%  
Worst quarter:
     04/01/2022 – 06/30/2022 – (18.97%)  
 
*
The Fund’s fiscal year end is September 30. The Fund’s most recent quarterly return (since the end of the last fiscal year) through December 31, 2023 was 12.28%.
Average Annual Total Returns – for the Periods Ended December 31, 2023
 
     1 Year     5 Years     10 Years     Since
Inception^
 
Institutional Shares – Before Taxes
     11.74     9.06     6.10     8.07
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions
     9.12     6.30     4.63     6.67
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
     8.73     7.19     4.90     6.61
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
MSCI ACWI Index (reflects no deductions for fees or expenses)*
     22.20     11.72     7.93     8.83
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Advisor Shares – Before Taxes
     11.63     8.94     6.00     7.97
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
18

^
The Institutional Shares and Advisor Shares of the Fund’s predecessor fund commenced operations on March 22, 2013. Investor Shares had not yet commenced operations as of the periods ended December 31, 2023.
*
Index returns shown are net of withholding taxes.
Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser
The Fund’s investment adviser is JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”).
Portfolio Managers
 
Christopher J.D. Lees, CFA
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2009*
  
Nudgem Richyal, CFA
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2009*
 
*
Each Portfolio Manager served as portfolio manager of the Fund’s predecessor, which reorganized into the Trust on July 19, 2021.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Initial Investment
 
Institutional    Advisor    Investor    Class Z
$100,000
   No minimum    No minimum    $10,000,000
There is no minimum for additional investments. If you hold shares through a financial intermediary, the financial intermediary may impose its own, different, investment minimums.
To Buy or Sell Shares:
Perpetual Americas Funds Trust
c/o The Northern Trust Company
P.O. Box 4766
Chicago, IL 60680-4766
Telephone: 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913
You can buy or sell shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open through your broker or financial intermediary, or by mail or telephone. You can pay for shares by wire. The Adviser and Perpetual Americas Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, reserve the right to waive any minimum in their sole discretion, and to reject any purchase order for any reason.
Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes
The Fund intends to make distributions that are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k), or other tax-advantaged investment plan. However, you may be subject to tax when you withdraw monies from a tax-advantaged plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s web site for more information.
 
19

FUND SUMMARY
JOHCM International Opportunities Fund
Investment Objective
The investment objective of the JOHCM International Opportunities Fund (the “Fund”) is to achieve long-term, risk-adjusted total return by investing in a portfolio of international equity securities.
Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
 
     Institutional
Shares
     Advisor
Shares
     Investor
Shares
     Class Z
Shares
 
Shareholder Fees (Fees paid directly from your investment)
           
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
     None        None        None        None  
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of net asset value)
     None        None        None        None  
Redemption Fee
     None        None        None        None  
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
           
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
           
Management Fee
     0.75%        0.75%        0.75%        0.75%  
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) Fees
     None        0.10%        0.25%        None  
Other Expenses
     3.45%        3.45%        3.45%        3.45%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
     4.20%        4.30%        4.45%        4.20%  
Fee Waivers and Reimbursements1
     3.70%        3.70%        3.70%        3.70%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Reimbursements
     0.50%        0.60%        0.75%        0.50%  
 
1 
JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.50%, 0.60%, 0.75%, and 0.50% for Institutional Shares, Advisor Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, until February 1, 2026. pursuant to a supplemental expense limitation agreement, between the Fund and the Adviser dated February 1, 2024 (the “Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement”). Pursuant to the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement, the Adviser (i) cannot recapture any waiver or reimbursement made pursuant to the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement and (ii) will suspend the payment of any recaptured waivers or reimbursements provided for under the expense limitation agreement between the Adviser and Trust dated February 1, 2024 (the “Primary Expense Limitation Agreement”), until February 1, 2026, the termination date of the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement. The Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement and Primary Expense Limitation Agreement may be terminated by the Board of Trustees, and certain amounts waived or reimbursed may be recaptured by the Adviser after February 1, 2026. The Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement and Primary Expense Limitation Agreement are described in more detail under “MANAGEMENT OF THE FUNDS—Fund Recoupment Arrangements” in the Fund’s prospectus.
 
20

Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that each year your investment has a 5% return and Fund operating expenses remain the same. The contractual expense limitation for the Fund is reflected in the 1 year example and for the first two years of the 3, 5 and 10 year examples. Although your actual costs and returns might be different, your approximate costs of investing $10,000 in the Fund would be:
 
     1 year      3 years      5 years      10 years  
Institutional Shares
   $ 51      $ 565      $ 1,497      $ 3,893  
Advisor Shares
   $ 61      $ 596      $ 1,546      $ 3,981  
Investor Shares
   $ 77      $ 641      $ 1,619      $ 4,112  
Class Z Shares
   $ 51      $ 565      $ 1,497      $ 3,893  
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recently completed fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate of the Fund was 34.88% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, primarily in equity securities of companies located outside the United States, including those located in emerging market countries. The Fund may invest in non-U.S. companies of any size, including small- and mid-capitalization companies, to achieve its objective. Equity securities include common and preferred stocks and include rights and warrants to subscribe to common stock or other equity securities. The Fund may achieve its equity exposure either directly or indirectly, such as through depositary receipts or participatory notes, though it does not use such indirect instruments for purposes of creating leverage. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in investments located in one country or a small number of countries. These countries may change from time to time.
The Fund operates as a “diversified” investment company and will typically own between 25-50 holdings. The portfolio managers aim to achieve above-average risk-adjusted total returns. The portfolio managers seek to achieve this through investing in a benchmark-agnostic portfolio what they believe to be of attractively-valued, high-quality companies with lower-than-average volatility (as measured against peers or relevant indices), over the medium term of three to five years. The portfolio managers seek to assess intrinsic value of such companies based on long term competitive advantages and cash flow expectations. They prioritize companies that they believe can generate cash profits reliably over many years and have opportunities to pay dividends and/or reinvest some of those profits at high rates of return. The portfolio managers look for opportunities where the capital markets underappreciate and misprice quality characteristics and growth potential. The portfolio managers believe that many market participants underestimate the potential for change and improvement of individual companies because they focus on and extrapolate a narrow range of backward-looking metrics such as recent earnings growth and returns on capital.
The portfolio managers believe that a key risk to any investor is permanent impairment of capital from owning overvalued assets. Overvaluation may result either from strong share price performance or from a deterioration in the expected intrinsic value of the underlying business. Therefore, the Fund maintains a valuation discipline intended to ensure that assets are only bought when they are attractively valued, in absolute terms, with reference to their estimated intrinsic value, and are sold when they become overvalued on the same basis.
 
21

Consistent with the Fund’s absolute valuation discipline, the portfolio managers may determine to delay reinvestment of sale proceeds or other available cash immediately, instead holding positions in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, potentially in an amount up to 20% of the net assets of the Fund, while examining and awaiting available investment opportunities.
Additionally, as part of the research and security selection processes, the portfolio managers ordinarily consider financially material environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) factors that they believe have the potential to adversely affect the long-term performance of a company. In doing so, the portfolio managers conduct their own proprietary ESG analysis, in addition to having access to third-party analytics sources such as Sustainalytics and MSCI, which they may use to augment or contextualize their own analysis. The portfolio managers’ ESG analysis is conducted on a company-by-company basis and does not place greater emphasis on any particular environmental, social or governance factor. The objective of the analysis is to identify both risks, which may result in a decision not to invest, and opportunities for engagement, where the portfolio managers judge that this has the potential to yield positive outcomes by bolstering the company’s path to improvement.
Principal Investment Risks
All investments carry a certain amount of risk, and the Fund cannot guarantee that it will achieve its investment objective. The value of the Fund’s investments will fluctuate with market conditions, and the value of your investment in the Fund also will vary. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could perform worse than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not deposits of a bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any other government agency. Below are the principal risks of investing in the Fund. All of the risks listed below are material to the Fund, regardless of the order in which they appear. The Fund should only be purchased by investors seeking long-term growth of capital who can withstand the share price volatility of equity investing with a focus on global stocks.
Non-U.S. Securities Risk. Investing in non-U.S. securities poses additional market risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers and may not affect the U.S. economy or U.S. issuers. In addition, issuers of non-U.S. securities often are not subject to as much regulation as U.S. issuers, and the reporting, accounting, custody, and auditing standards to which those issuers are subject often are not as rigorous as U.S. standards. Investments in non-U.S. securities may also be subject to greater environmental, credit and information risks. The Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities also are subject to non-U.S. currency fluctuations and other non-U.S. currency-related risks. Non-U.S. securities may be subject to higher volatility than U.S. securities, varying degrees of regulation and limited liquidity.
Emerging Markets Risk. In addition to the risks of investing in non-U.S. investments generally, emerging markets investments are subject to greater risks arising from political or economic instability, nationalization or confiscatory taxation, currency exchange restrictions, sanctions by other countries (such as the United States) and an issuer’s unwillingness or inability to make principal or interest payments on its obligations. Emerging markets companies may be smaller and have shorter operating histories than companies in developed markets. To the extent a Fund invests in frontier countries, these risks will be magnified. Frontier countries generally have smaller economies or less developed capital markets than traditional emerging market countries.
ESG Factor Risk. Considering ESG factors when evaluating an investment may result in the selection or exclusion of certain investments based on the Adviser’s view of these factors and carries the risk that the Fund may underperform funds that do not take ESG factors into account. In evaluating an issuer, the Adviser may be dependent upon information and data obtained through voluntary reporting by issuers or third-party research that may be incomplete, inaccurate or unavailable, which could impact the portfolio managers’ assessment of related risks and opportunities.
Equity Securities Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting issuers, industries, or financial markets in which the Fund invests will impact the value of the stocks held by the Fund and thus, the value of the Fund’s shares over short or extended periods.
 
22

Currency Risk. Investments in non-U.S. countries are also subject to currency risk. As the Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities are generally denominated in non-U.S. currencies, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect the value of the Fund’s investments. Some of the currencies in emerging markets have experienced devaluations relative to the U.S. dollar, and major adjustments have been made periodically in certain such currencies. Certain developing countries face serious exchange constraints.
Geographic Focus Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting the fiscal stability of a particular country or region in which the Fund focuses its investments will cause the value of the Fund’s shares to decrease, perhaps significantly. To the extent the Fund focuses its assets in a particular country or region, the Fund is more vulnerable to financial, economic or other political developments in that country or region as compared to a fund that does not focus on holdings in a particular country or region. As a result, the Fund may be more volatile than a fund which is broadly diversified geographically.
Active Management Risk. The Adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value, and potential appreciation of a particular asset class or individual security in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect, and there is no guarantee that individual securities will perform as anticipated. Any given investment strategy may fail to produce the intended results, and a Fund’s portfolio may underperform other comparable funds because of portfolio management decisions related to, among other things, the selection of investments, portfolio construction, evaluation of an issuer’s corporate governance practices, risk assessments, and/or the outlook on market trends and opportunities.
Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk. The small- and mid-capitalization companies in which the Fund invests in may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, these small- and mid-capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets, and financial resources, and may depend upon relatively small management groups. Therefore, small- and mid-capitalization stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies.
Equity-Linked Instruments Risk. There is a risk that, in addition to market risk and other risks of the referenced equity security, the Fund may experience a return that is different from that of the referenced equity security. Equity-linked instruments also subject the Fund to counterparty risk, including the risk that the issuing entity may not be able to honor its financial commitment, which could result in a loss of all or part of the Fund’s investment.
Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts may be sponsored or unsponsored. Although the two types of depositary receipt facilities are similar, there are differences regarding a holder’s rights and obligations and the practices of market participants. Holders of unsponsored depositary receipts generally bear all the costs of the facility. The depositary usually charges fees upon the deposit and withdrawal of the underlying securities, the conversion of dividends into U.S. dollars or other currency, the disposition of non-cash distributions, and the performance of other services. The depositary of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the underlying issuer or to pass through voting rights with respect to the underlying securities to depositary receipt holders.
Participatory Notes Risk. P-notes, which are designed to replicate the performance of certain issuers and markets where direct investment is either impossible or difficult due to local restrictions, represent interest in securities listed on certain non-U.S. exchanges, and thus present similar risks to investing directly in such securities. P‑notes also expose investors to counterparty risk, which is risk that the entity issuing the note may not be able to honor its financial commitments. The liquidity of a P-note reflects the liquidity in the underlying security. At times, it may be more illiquid than trading the underlying security as broker selection is restricted to the underwriter of the P-note.
Regulatory Risk. Changes in the laws or regulations of the United States or other countries, including changes to applicable tax laws and regulations, could impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective and could increase the operating expenses of the Fund.
 
23

Market Risk. The market value of the Fund’s investments will move up and down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based upon overall market and economic conditions, as well as a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuers of the Fund’s investments, such as management performance, financial condition and demand for the issuers’ goods and services.
Performance Information
The bar chart and performance table below provide an indication of the risks of an investment in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year, and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance reflects contractual fee waivers in effect. If fee waivers were not in place, performance would be reduced. For periods prior to the reorganization of the Fund, in which a predecessor fund was merged into the Fund, the performance information is based on the performance of the predecessor fund. After-tax returns are shown for Institutional Shares only and will vary from the after-tax returns for other share classes. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by calling 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913.
Annual Total Returns – Institutional Shares for year ended December 31*
LOGO
 
Best quarter:
     10/01/2022 – 12/31/2022 – 22.26%  
Worst quarter:
     01/01/2020 – 03/31/2020 – (17.90%)  
 
*
The Fund’s fiscal year end is September 30. The Fund’s most recent quarterly return (since the end of the last fiscal year) through December 31, 2023 was 9.62%.
Average Annual Total Returns – for the Periods Ended December 31, 2023
 
     1 Year     5 Years     Since
Inception^
 
Institutional Shares – Before Taxes
     19.54     9.17     6.91
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions
     19.44     8.05     5.73
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
     11.77     7.09     5.20
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
MSCI EAFE Index (reflects no deductions for fees or expenses)*
     18.24     8.16     6.51
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
^
The Institutional Shares of the Fund’s predecessor fund commenced operations on September 29, 2016.
*
Index returns shown are net of withholding taxes.
 
24

Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser
The Fund’s investment adviser is JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”).
Portfolio Managers
 
Robert Lancastle, CFA
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2016*
  
Ben Leyland, CFA
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2016*
 
*
Each Portfolio Manager served as portfolio manager of the Fund’s predecessor, which reorganized into the Trust on July 19, 2021.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Initial Investment
 
Institutional    Advisor    Investor    Class Z
$100,000
   No minimum    No minimum    $10,000,000
There is no minimum for additional investments. If you hold shares through a financial intermediary, the financial intermediary may impose its own, different, investment minimums.
To Buy or Sell Shares:
Perpetual Americas Funds Trust
c/o The Northern Trust Company
P.O. Box 4766
Chicago, IL 60680-4766
Telephone: 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913
You can buy or sell shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open through your broker or financial intermediary, or by mail or telephone. You can pay for shares by wire. The Adviser and Perpetual Americas Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, reserve the right to waive any minimum in their sole discretion, and to reject any purchase order for any reason.
Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes
The Fund intends to make distributions that are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k), or other tax-advantaged investment plan. However, you may be subject to tax when you withdraw monies from a tax-advantaged plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s web site for more information.
 
25

FUND SUMMARY
JOHCM International Select Fund
(The Fund is offered on a limited basis only. Refer to “How to Purchase Shares – Information Regarding Purchases of the JOHCM International Select Fund” on page 89 for more information.)
Investment Objective
The investment objective of the JOHCM International Select Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek long-term capital appreciation.
Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
 
     Institutional
Shares
     Investor
Shares
     Class Z
Shares
 
Shareholder Fees (Fees paid directly from your investment)
        
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
     None        None        None  
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of net asset value)
     None        None        None  
Redemption Fee
     None        None        None  
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
        
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
        
Management Fee
     0.89%        0.89%        0.89%  
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) Fees
     None        0.25%        None  
Other Expenses
     0.09%        0.09%        0.09%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
     0.98%        1.23%        0.98%  
Fee Waivers and Reimbursements1
     0.00%        0.02%        0.00%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Reimbursements
     0.98%        1.21%        0.98%  
 
1 
JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.98%, 1.21%, and 0.98% for Institutional Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, until February 1, 2025. If it becomes unnecessary for the Adviser to waive fees or make reimbursements, the Adviser may recapture any of its prior waivers or reimbursements for a period not to exceed three years from the date on which the waiver or reimbursement was made to the extent that such a recapture does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) to exceed the current expense limitation or the applicable expense limitation that was in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement. The agreement to waive fees and reimburse expenses may be terminated by the Board of Trustees at any time and will terminate automatically upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement.
Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods
 
26

indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that each year your investment has a 5% return and Fund operating expenses remain the same. Although your actual costs and returns might be different, your approximate costs of investing $10,000 in the Fund would be:
 
     1 year      3 years      5 years      10 years  
Institutional Shares
   $ 100      $ 312      $ 542      $ 1,201  
Investor Shares
   $ 123      $ 388      $ 674      $ 1,487  
Class Z Shares
   $ 100      $ 312      $ 542      $ 1,201  
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recently completed fiscal year, the portfolio turnover rate of the Fund was 32.29% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in common stocks and other equity securities of companies located outside the United States. The Fund’s equity securities include common and preferred stock, rights and warrants. Typically, the Fund invests in a number of different countries, including emerging markets. The Fund may invest in companies of any size, including small- and mid capitalization companies, in order to achieve its objective.
The portfolio managers seek to identify and make investments based on a multi-dimensional investment process, considering a number of factors, including growth, valuation, size, momentum, and beta. Beta measures the volatility of a stock relative to the overall market. The Fund utilizes a core investment style with a growth tilt (growth at a reasonable price, or “GARP”) over all capitalization ranges, which means that the Fund generally invests in larger, more established companies, but would expect to invest a somewhat greater portion of its assets in smaller, growth companies than would a typical large cap mutual fund. The GARP investment strategy is a blend of growth and value investing and seeks to find companies that have strong earnings growth at a good price. The Fund seeks those stocks, sectors, and countries with the potential to cause positive earnings surprises, with sustainably high or increasing return on equity, and with attractive valuations. The investment process utilizes a combination of bottom-up investing and top-down asset allocation that typically results in a portfolio of 30 to 60 holdings. Bottom-up investing utilizes techniques such as fundamental analysis to assess growth and value potential of individual issuers. In conducting fundamental analysis of companies that are being considered for purchase by the Fund, the portfolio managers evaluate, among other things, the financial condition and management of a company, its industry, stability of the country in which the company is located, and the interrelationship of these variables over time.
Top-down asset allocation utilizes evaluations of, among other things, economic factors including country risk, sector trends within individual countries and regions, and currency impact.
Investments are predominantly in common stock, however the Fund also expects to gain some of its equity exposure indirectly, such as through purchasing depositary receipts, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and/or participatory notes. Participatory notes (commonly known as “P-notes”) are instruments that provide exposure to, primarily, equity securities of issuers listed on a non-U.S. exchange and are typically used when a direct investment in the underlying security is either unpermitted, restricted or uneconomical due to country-specific regulations or other restrictions.
 
27

Principal Investment Risks
All investments carry a certain amount of risk, and the Fund cannot guarantee that it will achieve its investment objective. The value of the Fund’s investments will fluctuate with market conditions, and the value of your investment in the Fund also will vary. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could perform worse than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not deposits of a bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any other government agency. Below are the principal risks of investing in the Fund. All of the risks listed below are material to the Fund, regardless of the order in which they appear. The Fund should only be purchased by investors seeking long-term growth of capital who can withstand the share price volatility of equity investing with a focus on international stocks.
Equity Securities Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting issuers, industries, or financial markets in which the Fund invests will impact the value of the stocks held by the Fund and thus, the value of the Fund’s shares over short or extended periods.
Non-U.S. Securities Risk. Investing in non-U.S. securities poses additional market risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers and may not affect the U.S. economy or U.S. issuers. In addition, issuers of non-U.S. securities often are not subject to as much regulation as U.S. issuers, and the reporting, accounting, custody, and auditing standards to which those issuers are subject often are not as rigorous as U.S. standards. Investments in non-U.S. securities may also be subject to greater environmental, credit and information risks. The Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities also are subject to non- U.S. currency fluctuations and other non-U.S. currency-related risks. Non-U.S. securities may be subject to higher volatility than U.S. securities, varying degrees of regulation and limited liquidity.
Emerging Markets Risk. In addition to the risks of investing in non-U.S. investments generally, emerging markets investments are subject to greater risks arising from political or economic instability, nationalization or confiscatory taxation, currency exchange restrictions, sanctions by other countries (such as the United States) and an issuer’s unwillingness or inability to make principal or interest payments on its obligations. Emerging markets companies may be smaller and have shorter operating histories than companies in developed markets. To the extent a Fund invests in frontier countries, these risks will be magnified. Frontier countries generally have smaller economies or less developed capital markets than traditional emerging market countries.
ETF Risk. Shareholders of the Fund will indirectly be subject to the fees and expenses of the individual ETFs in which the Fund invests. In addition, an ETF may not replicate exactly the performance of the benchmark index it seeks to track for a number of reasons, including transaction costs incurred by the ETF, the temporary unavailability of certain index securities in the secondary market or discrepancies between the ETF and the index with respect to the weighting of securities or the number of securities held.
Active Management Risk. The Adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value, and potential appreciation of a particular asset class or individual security in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect, and there is no guarantee that individual securities will perform as anticipated. Any given investment strategy may fail to produce the intended results, and a Fund’s portfolio may underperform other comparable funds because of portfolio management decisions related to, among other things, the selection of investments, portfolio construction, evaluation of an issuer’s corporate governance practices, risk assessments, and/or the outlook on market trends and opportunities.
Growth Investing Risk. The prices of growth stocks may be based largely on expectations of future earnings, and their prices can decline rapidly and significantly in reaction to negative news. Growth stocks may underperform stocks in other broad style categories (and the stock market as a whole) over a short or long period of time and may shift in and out of favor with investors generally, sometimes rapidly, depending on changes in market, economic, and other factors.
 
28

GARP Investment Strategy Risk. GARP investing involves buying stocks that the portfolio managers believe have reasonable price/earnings ratios in relation to the relevant company’s current or expected future earnings growth rate. To the extent the Fund uses a GARP investing strategy, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected when stocks preferred by a GARP investing strategy underperform or are not favored by investors in prevailing market and economic conditions.
Preferred Stock Risk. The value of preferred stocks will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of preferred stock. Preferred stocks are also subject to credit risk, which is the possibility that an issuer of preferred stock will fail to make its dividend payments.
Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk. The small- and mid-capitalization companies in which the Fund invests in may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, these small- and mid-capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets and financial resources, and may depend upon relatively small management groups. Therefore, small- and mid-capitalization stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies.
Participatory Notes Risk. P-notes, which are designed to replicate the performance of certain issuers and markets where direct investment is either impossible or difficult due to local restrictions, represent interest in securities listed on certain non-U.S. exchanges, and thus present similar risks to investing directly in such securities. P‑notes also expose investors to counterparty risk, which is risk that the entity issuing the note may not be able to honor its financial commitments. The liquidity of a P-note reflects the liquidity in the underlying security. At times, it may be more illiquid than trading the underlying security as broker selection is restricted to the underwriter of the P-note.
Depositary Receipts Risk. Depositary receipts may be sponsored or unsponsored. Although the two types of depositary receipt facilities are similar, there are differences regarding a holder’s rights and obligations and the practices of market participants. Holders of unsponsored depositary receipts generally bear all the costs of the facility. The depositary usually charges fees upon the deposit and withdrawal of the underlying securities, the conversion of dividends into U.S. dollars or other currency, the disposition of non-cash distributions, and the performance of other services. The depositary of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the underlying issuer or to pass through voting rights with respect to the underlying securities to depositary receipt holders.
Regulatory Risk. Changes in the laws or regulations of the United States or other countries, including changes to applicable tax laws and regulations, could impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective and could increase the operating expenses of the Fund.
Value Investing Risk. Value securities are securities of companies that may have experienced adverse business, industry, or other developments or may be subject to special risks that have caused the securities to be out of favor and, in turn, potentially undervalued. It may take longer than expected for the value of such securities to rise to the anticipated value, or the value may never do so.
Market Risk. The market value of the Fund’s investments will move up and down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based upon overall market and economic conditions, as well as a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuers of the Fund’s investments, such as management performance, financial condition and demand for the issuers’ goods and services.
Performance Information
The bar chart and performance table below provide an indication of the risks of an investment in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year, and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance reflects
 
29

contractual fee waivers in effect. If fee waivers were not in place, performance would be reduced. For periods prior to the reorganization of the Fund, in which a predecessor fund was merged into the Fund, the performance information is based on the performance of the predecessor fund. Historical performance for Investor Shares prior to its inception is based on the performance of Institutional Shares. The performance of Investor Shares has been adjusted to reflect differences in expenses. After-tax returns are shown for Institutional Shares only and will vary from the after-tax returns for other share classes. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by calling 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913.
Annual Total Returns – Institutional Shares for year ended December 31*
LOGO
 
Best quarter:
     04/01/2020 – 06/30/2020 – 23.44%  
Worst quarter:
     04/01/2022 – 06/30/2022 – (20.53%)  
 
*
The Fund’s fiscal year end is September 30. The Fund’s most recent quarterly return (since the end of the last fiscal year) through December 31, 2023 was 10.61%.
Average Annual Total Returns – for the Periods Ended December 31, 2023
 
     1 Year     5 Years     10 Years     Since
Inception^
 
Institutional Shares – Before Taxes
     18.12     6.14     4.91     8.02
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions
     17.77     5.44     4.42     7.66
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
     11.27     5.01     4.02     6.82
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
MSCI EAFE Index (reflects no deductions for fees or expenses)*
     18.24     8.16     4.28     6.21
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
Investor Shares – Before Taxes
     17.88     5.89     4.65     7.78
  
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
^
While Institutional Shares of the Fund’s predecessor fund commenced operations on July 29, 2009, Institutional Shares began investing consistent with its investment objective on July 30, 2009. Investor Shares commenced operations on March 31, 2010.
*
Index returns shown are net of withholding taxes.
 
30

Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser
The Fund’s investment adviser is JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”).
Portfolio Managers
 
Christopher J.D. Lees, CFA
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2009*
  
Nudgem Richyal, CFA
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2009*
 
*
Each Portfolio Manager served as portfolio manager of the Fund’s predecessor, which reorganized into the Trust on July 19, 2021.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Initial Investment
 
Institutional    Advisor    Investor    Class Z
$100,000
   No minimum    No minimum    $10,000,000
There is no minimum for additional investments. If you hold shares through a financial intermediary, the financial intermediary may impose its own, different, investment minimums.
To Buy or Sell Shares:
Perpetual Americas Funds Trust
c/o The Northern Trust Company
P.O. Box 4766
Chicago, IL 60680-4766
Telephone: 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913
You can buy or sell shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open through your broker or financial intermediary, or by mail or telephone. You can pay for shares by wire. The Adviser and Perpetual Americas Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, reserve the right to waive any minimum in their sole discretion, and to reject any purchase order for any reason.
Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes
The Fund intends to make distributions that are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k), or other tax-advantaged investment plan. However, you may be subject to tax when you withdraw monies from a tax-advantaged plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s web site for more information.
 
31

FUND SUMMARY
Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions
Investment Objective
The investment objective of Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions (the “Fund”) is to seek to achieve long-term capital appreciation by investing in companies that contribute solutions to addressing the world’s major social and environmental challenges.
Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
 
     Institutional
Shares
     Advisor
Shares
     Investor
Shares
     Class Z
Shares
 
Shareholder Fees (Fees paid directly from your investment)
           
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
     None        None        None        None  
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of net asset value)
     None        None        None        None  
Redemption Fee
     None        None        None        None  
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
           
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
           
Management Fee
     0.75%        0.75%        0.75%        0.75%  
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) Fees
     None        0.10%        0.25%        None  
Other Expenses
     0.58%        0.58%        0.58%        0.58%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
     1.33%        1.43%        1.58%        1.33%  
Fee Waivers and Reimbursements1
     0.44%        0.44%        0.44%        0.44%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Reimbursements
     0.89%        0.99%        1.14%        0.89%  
 
1 
JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.89%, 0.99%, 1.14%, and 0.89% for Institutional Shares, Advisor Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, until February 1, 2025. If it becomes unnecessary for the Adviser to waive fees or make reimbursements, the Adviser may recapture any of its prior waivers or reimbursements for a period not to exceed three years from the date on which the waiver or reimbursement was made to the extent that such a recapture does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) to exceed the current expense limitation or the applicable expense limitation that was in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement. The agreement to waive fees and reimburse expenses may be terminated by the Board of Trustees at any time and will terminate automatically upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement.
 
32

Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that each year your investment has a 5% return and Fund operating expenses remain the same. The contractual expense limitation for the Fund is reflected only in the 1 year example and for the first year of the 3, 5 and 10 year examples. Although your actual costs and returns might be different, your approximate costs of investing $10,000 in the Fund would be:
 
     1 year      3 years      5 Years      10 Years  
Institutional Shares
     $91      $ 378      $ 687      $ 1,563  
Advisor Shares
   $ 101      $ 409      $ 740      $ 1,675  
Investor Shares
   $ 116      $ 456      $ 819      $ 1,841  
Class Z Shares
     $91      $ 378      $ 687      $ 1,563  
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. During the most recently completed fiscal year, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate was 65.32% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in a high-conviction global equity portfolio of companies the portfolio managers believe have the potential to contribute solutions to the world’s major social and environmental challenges. The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities of companies that the portfolio managers believe satisfy their criteria for positive social or environmental impact. The Adviser measures this impact by applying the Regnan Taxonomy, as described below, in conjunction with a proprietary impact assessment, by the portfolio managers. This impact assessment is based upon qualitative and quantitative assessment, including the measurement of the activities that currently constitute, or that the portfolio managers expect over the long term will constitute, a significant portion (i.e., at least 30%) of a company’s business (using metrics that may include, without limitation, any of the following: revenues, earnings, capital expenditures, research and development investment, or book value). The Fund gains exposure to equity securities either directly or indirectly, through equity-linked instruments such as participatory notes or index exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), and may invest in preferred stocks.
Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest at least 40% of its assets in companies located in countries other than the U.S., including developing, frontier market or emerging market countries. Notwithstanding, the Fund may invest a percentage lower than 40% in such non-U.S. securities if the weighting of non-U.S. securities in the Fund’s performance benchmark (currently the MSCI ACWI Investable Market Index) drops below 45%, in which case the Fund’s minimum level for investments in non-U.S. securities must remain within 5% of the benchmark’s weighting. Under normal circumstances, the Fund expects to invest in a range of countries, typically at least 10 different countries. While the Fund may invest in companies of any size, the portfolio managers investment approach will typically result in a bias toward investment in small and mid-capitalization companies, including initial public offerings (“IPOs”). The Fund’s high-conviction investment approach may result in the Fund having significant exposure to one or a handful of economic sectors, however the Fund will not concentrate its investments in a particular industry.
 
33

The Fund’s investment strategy is built on the belief that companies that undertake to solve the challenges increasingly faced by the environment and society are well-positioned for growth in the future, particularly where the need for a solution to a particular challenge remains largely unmet. The portfolio managers believe that these underserved environmental and societal needs will result in demand for a product or service that is scarcely available, so companies that are able to fulfill these needs should therefore be rewarded with revenue growth over time, as the size of the market into which they sell their core products or services grows. The portfolio managers believe that this is particularly true if a company’s solution uses a degree of technological ingenuity or a differentiated approach. The portfolio managers seek to invest in companies that sell products or services that are at the early stages of their adoption, as the economic value of such products and services tends, in the portfolio managers’ view, to be underestimated by the market. The stage at which the portfolio managers choose to invest may vary by industry or by product, although in each case, the portfolio managers generally intend to invest before a company’s full value is recognized by the broader market.
For purposes of establishing the Fund’s investment universe, the portfolio managers make use of a proprietary research framework, referred to as the Regnan Taxonomy, in an effort to gain exposure to truly mission-driven companies that are able to drive additional positive impacts through the sale of an innovative solution to a particular environmental or social problem. In identifying investment opportunities, the Regnan Taxonomy seeks to: (i) understand and identify the underlying environmental and social problems which need to be addressed; (ii) identify the products and services that contribute to finding solutions to these problems; and (iii) identify suitable companies that are selling these products and services. In identifying the underlying environmental and social problems to be addressed, the Regnan Taxonomy draws on the targets that underlie the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (the “UN SDGs”). The UN SDGs may change over time, and the Regnan Taxonomy may also incorporate other goals linked to other sustainability frameworks as determined by the Adviser. The Regnan Taxonomy uses proprietary research to determine which companies derive a significant portion of their revenue from producing the products and services that contribute to finding solutions to these problems.
Once the investment universe is established, the portfolio managers undertake qualitative analyses of potential candidates, including a fundamental business analysis and an extensive impact assessment that seeks to evaluate companies’ potential to drive a positive impact in the future. Following the impact assessment, the portfolio managers then undertake a comprehensive value analysis and a risk assessment. The value analysis looks at the value that each holding is expected to generate and whether the value is distributed equitably to all stakeholders. The risk assessment seeks to identify the key risks that could potentially derail the company, what kinds and levels of risks are acceptable, how the risks can be monitored, and whether the company could be encouraged to address the risks through engagement with the portfolio managers.
The intended outcome of the investment process is a portfolio that will typically consist of between 25 and 50 companies. The portfolio managers select companies without regard to the Fund’s performance benchmark and expects to depart significantly from the holdings and weightings in that benchmark. The portfolio managers add issuers to the Fund’s portfolio typically with the intention of holding the securities for longer periods (typically at least 5 years), which is expected to result in a relatively low portfolio turnover rate that aligns with the Fund’s long-term investment outlook. Although the Fund did not invest significantly in derivatives instruments as of the most recent fiscal year end, it may do so at any time.
Principal Investment Risks
All investments carry a certain amount of risk, and the Fund cannot guarantee that it will achieve its investment objective. The value of the Fund’s investments will fluctuate with market conditions, and the value of your investment in the Fund also will vary. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could perform worse than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not deposits of a bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund (in alphabetical order after the first five risks) are:
 
34

Impact Investing Risk. The Fund intends to invest its assets in companies that meet its impact investing criteria pursuant to the Regnan Taxonomy. This may affect the Fund’s exposure to certain companies or industries and the Fund will forego certain investment opportunities. The Fund’s results may be lower than other funds that do not seek to invest in companies based on expected environmental or societal impact outcomes. The portfolio managers seek to identify companies that they believe may have a positive environmental or societal impact outcome, but may not be successful in assessing and identifying companies that have or will have a positive environmental or societal impact outcomes. Successful application of the Fund’s impact investing strategy will depend on its portfolio managers’ ability to identify and analyze a company’s impact, and there can be no assurance that the strategy or techniques employed will be successful. Further, investors may differ in their views of what constitutes positive or negative environmental or societal impact outcomes. As a result, the Fund may invest in companies that do not reflect the beliefs and values of any particular investor.
Equity Securities Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting issuers, industries or financial markets in which the Fund invests will impact the value of the stocks held by the Fund and thus, the value of the Fund’s shares over short or extended periods.
Focused Investment Risk. Focusing investments in a particular market, sector or value chain (which may include issuers in a number of different industries) increases the risk of loss because the stocks of many or all of the companies in such market, sector or value chain may decline in value due to economic, market, technological, political or regulatory developments adversely affecting the market or value chain.
Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk. The small- and mid-capitalization companies in which the Fund invests in may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, these small- and mid-capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets and financial resources, may sell products or services that are at the early stages of their adoption, and may depend upon relatively small management groups. Therefore, small- and mid-capitalization stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies.
Non-U.S. Securities Risk. Investing in non-U.S. securities poses additional market risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers and may not affect the U.S. economy or U.S. issuers. In addition, issuers of non-U.S. securities often are not subject to as much regulation as U.S. issuers, and the reporting, accounting, custody, and auditing standards to which those issuers are subject often are not as rigorous as U.S. standards. Investments in non-U.S. securities may also be subject to greater environmental, credit and information risks. The Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities also are subject to non-U.S. currency fluctuations and other non-U.S. currency-related risks. Non-U.S. securities may be subject to higher volatility than U.S. securities, varying degrees of regulation and limited liquidity.
Currency Risk. Investments in non-U.S. countries are also subject to currency risk. As the Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities are generally denominated in non-U.S. currencies, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect the value of the Fund’s investments. Some of the currencies in emerging markets have experienced devaluations relative to the U.S. dollar, and major adjustments have been made periodically in certain such currencies. Certain developing countries face serious exchange constraints.
Derivatives Risk. The Fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index.
Emerging Markets Risk. In addition to the risks of investing in non-U.S. investments generally, emerging markets investments are subject to greater risks arising from political or economic instability, nationalization or confiscatory taxation, currency exchange restrictions, sanctions by other countries (such as the United States) and
 
35

an issuer’s unwillingness or inability to make principal or interest payments on its obligations. Emerging markets companies may be smaller and have shorter operating histories than companies in developed markets. To the extent a Fund invests in frontier countries, these risks will be magnified. Frontier countries generally have smaller economies or less developed capital markets than traditional emerging market countries.
Equity-Linked Instruments Risk. There is a risk that, in addition to market risk and other risks of the referenced equity security, the Fund may experience a return that is different from that of the referenced equity security. Equity-linked instruments also subject the Fund to counterparty risk, including the risk that the issuing entity may not be able to honor its financial commitment, which could result in a loss of all or part of the Fund’s investment.
Growth Investing Risk. The prices of growth stocks may be based largely on expectations of future earnings, and their prices can decline rapidly and significantly in reaction to negative news. Growth stocks may underperform stocks in other broad style categories (and the stock market as a whole) over a short or long period of time and may shift in and out of favor with investors generally, sometimes rapidly, depending on changes in market, economic, and other factors.
Hedging Risk. Hedging is a strategy in which the Fund uses a derivative or other security to offset certain risks associated with other Fund holdings or to render the portfolio more resilient to market fluctuations. There can be no assurance that the Fund’s hedging strategy will reduce risk or that hedging transactions will be either available or cost effective. The Fund is not required to use hedging and may choose not to do so.
IPO Risk. The Fund may purchase securities in Initial Public Offerings (“IPO”s). These securities are subject to many of the same risks of investing in companies with smaller market capitalizations. Securities issued in IPOs have no trading history, and information about the companies may be available for very limited periods. In addition, the prices of securities sold in IPOs may be highly volatile.
Limited History of Operations. The Fund is a newly organized, diversified, open-end management investment company with a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Liquidity Risk. The Fund may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value.
Long-Term Investment Strategy Risk. The Fund pursues a long-term investment approach, typically seeking returns over a period of several years. This investment style may cause the Fund to lose money or underperform compared to its benchmark index or other mutual funds over extended periods of time, and the Fund may not perform as expected in the long term. An investment in the Fund may be more suitable for long-term investors who can bear the risk of short- or medium-term fluctuations in the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
Active Management Risk. The Adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value and potential appreciation of a particular asset class or individual security in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect, and there is no guarantee that individual securities will perform as anticipated. Any given investment strategy may fail to produce the intended results, and a Fund’s portfolio may underperform other comparable funds because of portfolio management decisions related to, among other things, the selection of investments, portfolio construction, evaluation of an issuer’s corporate governance practices, risk assessments, and/or the outlook on market trends and opportunities.
Participatory Notes Risk. P-notes, which are designed to replicate the performance of certain issuers and markets where direct investment is either impossible or difficult due to local restrictions, represent interest in securities listed on certain non-U.S. exchanges, and thus present similar risks to investing directly in such securities. P‑notes also expose investors to counterparty risk, which is risk that the entity issuing the note may not be able to honor its financial commitments. The liquidity of a P-note reflects the liquidity in the underlying security. At times, it may be more illiquid than trading the underlying security as broker selection is restricted to the underwriter of the P-note.
 
36

Preferred Stock Risk. The value of preferred stocks will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of preferred stock. Preferred stocks are also subject to credit risk, which is the possibility that an issuer of preferred stock will fail to make its dividend payments.
Regulatory Risk. Changes in the laws or regulations of the United States or other countries, including any changes to applicable tax laws and regulations, could impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective and could increase the operating expenses of the Fund.
Value Investing Risk. Value securities are securities of companies that may have experienced adverse business, industry, or other developments or may be subject to special risks that have caused the securities to be out of favor and, in turn, potentially undervalued. It may take longer than expected for the value of such securities to rise to the anticipated value, or the value may never do so.
Market Risk. The market value of the Fund’s investments will move up and down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based upon overall market and economic conditions, as well as a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuers of the Fund’s investments, such as management performance, financial condition and demand for the issuers’ goods and services.
Performance Information
The bar chart and performance table below provide an indication of the risks of an investment in the Fund by showing how the Fund’s performance has varied from year to year, and by showing how the Fund’s average annual returns compare with those of a broad measure of market performance. Performance reflects contractual fee waivers in effect. If fee waivers were not in place, performance would be reduced. After-tax returns are shown for Institutional Shares only and will vary from the after-tax returns for other share classes. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. After-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold their Fund shares through tax-deferred arrangements, such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts (“IRAs”). Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available by calling 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913.
Annual Total Returns – Institutional Shares for year ended December 31*
LOGO
 
Best quarter:
     10/01/2023 – 12/31/2023 – 17.65%  
Worst quarter:
     04/01/2022 – 06/30/2022 – (17.60%)  
 
*
The Fund’s fiscal year end is September 30. The Fund’s most recent quarterly return (since the end of the last fiscal year) through December 31, 2023 was 17.65%.
 
37

Average Annual Total Returns – for the Periods Ended December 31, 2023
 
     1 Year     Since
Inception^
 
Institutional Shares – Before Taxes
     18.82     -7.09
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions
     18.83     7.07
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
Institutional Shares – After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
     11.43 %     5.25
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
MSCI ACWI Investable Market Index (reflects no deductions for fees or expenses)*
     21.49     1.16
  
 
 
   
 
 
 
 
^
The Institutional Shares of the Fund commenced operations on August 23, 2021.
*
Index returns shown are net of withholding taxes.
Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser
The Fund’s investment adviser is JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”).
Portfolio Managers
 
Mohsin Ahmad, CFA
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2021 (inception)
 
Tim Crockford
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2021 (inception)
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Initial Investment
 
Institutional    Advisor    Investor    Class Z
$100,000    No minimum    No minimum    $10,000,000
There is no minimum for additional investments. If you hold shares through a financial intermediary, the financial intermediary may impose its own, different, investment minimums.
To Buy or Sell Shares:
Perpetual Americas Funds Trust
c/o The Northern Trust Company
P.O. Box 4766
Chicago, IL 60680-4766
Telephone: 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913
You can buy or sell shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open through your broker or financial intermediary, or by mail or telephone. You can pay for shares by wire. The Adviser and Perpetual Americas Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, reserve the right to waive any minimum in their sole discretion, and to reject any purchase order for any reason.
Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes
The Fund intends to make distributions that are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k), or other tax-advantaged investment plan. However, you may be subject to tax when you withdraw monies from a tax-advantaged plan.
 
38

Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s web site for more information.
 
39

FUND SUMMARY
Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund
Investment Objective
The investment objective of Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek to achieve long-term capital appreciation by investing in a global equity portfolio of companies along the water and waste value chains.
Fees and Expenses
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the tables and examples below.
 
     Institutional
Shares
     Advisor
Shares
     Investor
Shares
     Class Z
Shares
 
Shareholder Fees (Fees paid directly from your investment)
           
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
     None        None        None        None  
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of net asset value)
     None        None        None        None  
Redemption Fee
     None        None        None        None  
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
           
(Expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
           
Management Fee
     0.75%        0.75%        0.75%        0.75%  
Distribution (Rule 12b-1) Fees
     None        0.10%        0.25%        None  
Other Expenses2
     6.66%        6.66%        6.66%        6.66%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
     7.41%        7.51%        7.66%        7.41%  
Fee Waivers and Reimbursements1
     -6.52%        -6.52%        -6.52%        -6.52%  
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Reimbursements
     0.89%        0.99%        1.14%        0.89%  
 
1 
JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”) has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.89%, 0.99%, 1.14%, and 0.89% for Institutional Shares, Advisor Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, until February 1, 2025. If it becomes unnecessary for the Adviser to waive fees or make reimbursements, the Adviser may recapture any of its prior waivers or reimbursements for a period not to exceed three years from the date on which the waiver or reimbursement was made to the extent that such a recapture does not cause the Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) to exceed the current expense limitation or the applicable expense limitation that was in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement. The agreement to waive fees and reimburse expenses may be terminated by the Board of Trustees at any time and will terminate automatically upon termination of the Investment Advisory Agreement.
2 
Other Expenses are estimated for the current fiscal year.
Example
This example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds. The example assumes that you invest $10,000 in the Fund for the time periods
 
40

indicated and then redeem all of your shares at the end of those periods. The example also assumes that each year your investment has a 5% return and Fund operating expenses remain the same. The contractual expense limitation for the Fund is reflected only in the 1 year example and for the first year of the 3 year example. Although your actual costs and returns might be different, your approximate costs of investing $10,000 in the Fund would be:
 
     1 year      3 years  
Institutional Shares
     $91      $ 1,597  
Advisor Shares
   $ 101      $ 1,624  
Investor Shares
   $ 116      $ 1,665  
Class Z Shares
     $91      $ 1,597  
Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs, such as commissions, when it buys and sells securities (or “turns over” its portfolio). A higher portfolio turnover rate may indicate higher transaction costs and may result in higher taxes when Fund shares are held in a taxable account. These costs, which are not reflected in annual fund operating expenses or in the example, affect the Fund’s performance. Because the Fund has not yet commenced operations as of the date of this prospectus, the Fund’s portfolio turnover rate for the most recent fiscal year is not available.
Principal Investment Strategies
The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in a global equity portfolio of companies the portfolio managers believe, based on such companies’ activities and public disclosures, have the potential to contribute solutions to global water- or waste-related challenges and which satisfy their criteria for possessing sustainable attributes (as described further below).
The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities of companies that have a material business involvement in water or waste solutions and that meet the portfolio managers’ sustainability criteria. The portfolio managers consider business involvement in water or waste solutions to be material if at least 50% of a company’s activities (as measured by sales, earnings, or similar metrics) are derived from a product or service in the water or waste value chain that addresses water or waste solutions. The water value chain is the range of activities implicated in the transport, management and use of water. The waste value chain is the range of activities implicated in the transport, storage and management of waste in any of its forms (whether liquid, solid or gas).
 
   
Water solutions include, but are not limited to water production; water conditioning and desalination; water supply; water treatment, transport, and dispatching; treatment of wastewater; water infrastructure equipment and services; water-related construction; and related consulting and engineering services as well as other related services or industries.
 
   
Waste solutions include, but are not limited to waste collection, transporting, sorting, and recycling; sewage treatment plants; hazardous waste management; air filtering and cleaning; sanitization; site remediation; pollution prevention and control; sustainable packaging; environment planning; as well as consulting, engineering and other services related to the foregoing.
The portfolio managers monitor around 350 companies that make up the Fund’s current investment universe and seek to identify companies along the water and waste value chains that, in their opinion, provide solutions to global water-or waste-related challenges. The portfolio managers consider water-related challenges to include but not be limited to: improving access to drinking water, repairing and maintaining water transportation infrastructure and advancing water treatment processes. The portfolio managers consider waste-
 
41

related challenges to include but not be limited to: improving waste management safety and efficiency and finding sustainable solutions to capacity constraints relating to the management of waste in any of its forms.
The portfolio managers analyze specific companies through a rigorous stock-selection process that simultaneously combines bottom-up analysis of business quality, a valuation assessment of absolute upside potential and ESG research to construct a portfolio that normally holds between 35 and 50 stocks. The bottom-up analysis includes considerations such as revenue model analysis, profit analysis, history of cash generation, and balance sheet assessment to assess the valuation and appropriateness of candidates for inclusion in the portfolio. In identifying potential investments, the portfolio managers ordinarily look for companies that exhibit some or all of the following characteristics: a focus on the waste and water investment theme, a strong market position of such company within its sector, a sustainable business model, high quality management, a strong balance sheet, including the company’s ability to satisfy its short-term liabilities, and a demonstrated history of cash generation. The investment process does not target any particular allocation as between water solutions and waste solutions, and the mix of investments as between those two themes can vary significantly over time. The portfolio managers typically intend to hold investments for 3-5 years or more. Although the Fund is a global, unconstrained Fund which can invest in emerging markets and frontier markets as well as developed markets—and while the Fund does not apply a minimum or maximum limit on exposure to any single country—it is expected that the majority of the Fund’s holdings will be located in developed markets. The Fund has the flexibility to invest in companies at any market capitalization.
ESG Screening
The portfolio managers apply an enhanced principles-based ESG exclusion policy to screen out certain companies or practices based on specific ESG criteria they identify. A norms-based screening component excludes any company which the portfolio managers consider to have failed to conduct its business in accordance with accepted international norms, as set out in the United Nations Global Compact (including human rights, labor rights, environment, and anti-corruption). Additionally, a negative screening component excludes companies which have exposure to certain sectors, issuers or securities.
Sustainability
The portfolio managers then use both quantitative and qualitative factors to form an assessment of a company’s “sustainable” attributes, including for example audit data, workplace health and safety and remuneration. A company is considered to maintain sustainable attributes where the company meets minimum standards of environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) risk and sustainability management, as assessed by the portfolio managers. The portfolio managers will invest a minimum of 70% of the Fund’s net assets in companies which are maintaining sustainable attributes and a maximum of 30% of the Fund’s net assets in companies which demonstrate improving sustainable attributes.
This sustainability assessment uses a combination of measurements, including, but not limited to, ESG ratings provided by Morgan Stanley Capital International (“MSCI”) and the Adviser’s proprietary internal sustainability ratings. The Adviser assigns a score from 1-5 for each ESG factor (“E,” “S” and “G”) based on its assessment of the extent to which sustainability management contributes to sustained value creation and aggregates the “E”, “S”, and “G” factor scores to calculate a company’s overall score.
Companies rated BBB and above on MSCI’s ESG ratings are defined by the Adviser as maintaining sustainable attributes. Where an MSCI ESG rating is not available, companies rated above 2.5 by the Adviser’s proprietary rating system are defined as maintaining sustainable attributes. For the remaining companies, the Adviser assigns each such company a momentum assessment classification (“stable”, “improving” or “weakening”) to indicate the expected direction of change in the company’s overall ESG score. Companies classified as improving and companies which, in the view of the Adviser, demonstrate the potential for improvement and are collectively defined by the portfolio managers as demonstrating improving sustainable attributes.
 
42

The portfolio managers will seek to sell an investment if one of the following conditions has been met: (1) a change or development invalidates the investment case or implies the company would no longer pass the sustainability assessment, (2) they have identified a company that they believe offers a better solution to global water- or waste-related challenges or that they believe has a valuation that offers better risk-reward, (3) their trust in the company is damaged and/or the company is no longer willing to engage, or (4) the portfolio managers perceive that their long-term investment thesis for the holding is no longer valid.
Although the Fund does not expect to invest significantly in derivative instruments and generally does not hedge currency, it may do so at any time depending on market performance.
The Fund may invest in affiliated or unaffiliated investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”). The Fund may also participate in initial public offerings (“IPOs”).
Principal Investment Risks
All investments carry a certain amount of risk, and the Fund cannot guarantee that it will achieve its investment objective. The value of the Fund’s investments will fluctuate with market conditions, and the value of your investment in the Fund also will vary. You could lose money on your investment in the Fund, or the Fund could perform worse than other investments. Investments in the Fund are not deposits of a bank and are not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any other government agency. The principal risks of investing in the Fund (in alphabetical order after the first six risks) are:
Equity Securities Risk. The risk that events negatively affecting issuers, industries or financial markets in which the Fund invests will impact the value of the stocks held by the Fund and thus, the value of the Fund’s shares over short or extended periods. Price volatility is the principal risk of investing in the Fund. Investments in small capitalization or in mid-capitalization companies may be more volatile than investments in larger companies.
Sustainable Investing Risk. Applying sustainability criteria to the investment process may exclude or reduce exposure to securities of certain issuers for sustainability reasons and, therefore, the Fund may forgo some market opportunities available to funds that do not use sustainability criteria. The Fund’s performance may at times be better or worse than the performance of funds that do not use sustainability criteria. Because the Adviser evaluates ESG metrics when selecting certain securities, the Fund’s portfolio may perform differently than funds that do not use ESG metrics. ESG metrics may prioritize long term rather than short term returns. ESG information and data, including that provided by third parties, may be incomplete, inaccurate, or unavailable, which could adversely affect the analysis relevant to a particular investment. In addition, there is a risk that the securities identified by the Adviser to fit within its sustainability criteria do not operate as anticipated. Although the Adviser seeks to identify issuers that fit within its sustainability criteria, investors may differ in their views of what fits within this category of investments. As a result, the Fund may invest in issuers that do not reflect the beliefs and values of any particular investor. The Adviser’s exclusion of certain investments from the Fund’s investment universe may adversely affect the Fund’s relative performance at times when such investments are performing well.
Focused Investment Risk. Focusing investments in a particular market, sector or value chain (which may include issuers in a number of different industries) increases the risk of loss because the stocks of many or all of the companies in such market, sector or value chain may decline in value due to economic, market, technological, political or regulatory developments adversely affecting the market or value chain. Because the Fund focuses on water-and waste-related investments, the Fund will be subject to a greater extent to risks associated with these value chains. Please see “Water-Related Risks” and “Waste-Related Risks” for more information on these specific risks.
Waste-related Risks. Companies operating in the waste water value chain can be affected by, among other things, availability and cost of labor to collect and transport waste, transportation costs, consumer and industry trends
 
43

and subsequent waste volumes, regulatory changes on collection, and treatment of waste. These companies can also be affected by overall economic trends, government spending on related projects, and the cost of commodities.
Water-related Risks. Companies operating in the water value chain can be affected by, among other things, irrigation and industrial usage trends, viability of infrastructure projects, regulatory changes on water usage, pricing, contamination and reusability, and environmental factors such as floods and droughts. These companies can also be affected by overall economic trends, interest rates, government spending on related projects, and the cost of commodities.
Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk. The small- and mid-capitalization companies in which the Fund invests in may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, small- and mid-capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets and financial resources and may depend upon relatively small management groups. Therefore, small- and mid-capitalization stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies.
Currency Risk. Investments in foreign countries are also subject to currency risk. As the Fund’s investments in foreign securities are generally denominated in foreign currencies, changes in the value of those currencies compared to the U.S. dollar may affect the value of the Fund’s investments. Some of the currencies in emerging markets have experienced devaluations relative to the U.S. dollar, and major adjustments have been made periodically in certain such currencies. Certain developing countries face serious exchange constraints.
Derivatives Risk. The Fund may use derivatives (including futures and forward contracts) to hedge against market declines. The Fund’s use of derivative instruments involves risks different from, or possibly greater than, the risks associated with investing directly in securities and other traditional investments. These risks include (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate or index.
ETF Risk. In addition to the risks associated with the underlying assets held by an ETF, investments in ETFs may be subject to the following additional risks: (1) an ETF’s shares may trade above or below its net asset value; (2) an active trading market for an ETF’s shares may not develop or be maintained; (3) trading an ETF’s shares may be halted by the listing exchange; (4) a passively-managed ETF may not track the performance of the reference asset; and (5) a passively-managed ETF may hold troubled securities. Investment in ETFs may involve duplication of management fees and certain other expenses, as the Fund indirectly bears its proportionate share of any expenses paid by the ETFs in which it invests.
Emerging Markets Risk. In addition to the risks of investing in non-U.S. investments generally, emerging markets investments are subject to greater risks arising from political or economic instability, nationalization or confiscatory taxation, currency exchange restrictions, sanctions by other countries (such as the United States) and an issuer’s unwillingness or inability to make principal or interest payments on its obligations. Emerging markets companies may be smaller and have shorter operating histories than companies in developed markets. To the extent a Fund invests in frontier countries, these risks will be magnified. Frontier countries generally have smaller economies or less developed capital markets than traditional emerging market countries.
Hedging Risk. Hedging is a strategy in which the Fund uses a derivative or other security to offset certain risks associated with other Fund holdings or to render the portfolio more resilient to market fluctuations. There can be no assurance that the Fund’s hedging strategy will reduce risk or that hedging transactions will be either available or cost effective. The Fund is not required to use hedging and may choose not to do so.
IPO Risk. The Fund may purchase securities in Initial Public Offerings (“IPOs”). These securities are subject to many of the same risks of investing in companies with smaller market capitalizations. Securities issued in IPOs
 
44

have no trading history, and information about the companies may be available for very limited periods. In addition, the prices of securities sold in IPOs may be highly volatile.
Limited History of Operations. The Fund is a newly organized, diversified, open-end management investment company with a limited operating history. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision.
Liquidity Risk. The Fund may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value.
Long-Term Investment Strategy Risk. The Fund pursues a long-term investment approach, typically seeking returns over a period of several years. This investment style may cause the Fund to lose money or underperform compared to its benchmark index or other mutual funds over extended periods of time, and the Fund may not perform as expected in the long term. An investment in the Fund may be more suitable for long-term investors who can bear the risk of short- or medium-term fluctuations in the value of the Fund’s portfolio.
Active Management Risk. The Adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value and potential appreciation of a particular asset class or individual security in which the Fund invests may prove to be incorrect, and there is no guarantee that individual securities will perform as anticipated. Any given investment strategy may fail to produce the intended results, and a Fund’s portfolio may underperform other comparable funds because of portfolio management decisions related to, among other things, the selection of investments, portfolio construction, evaluation of an issuer’s corporate governance practices, risk assessments, and/or the outlook on market trends and opportunities.
Non-U.S. Securities Risk. Investing in non-U.S. securities poses additional market risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers and may not affect the U.S. economy or U.S. issuers. In addition, issuers of non-U.S. securities often are not subject to as much regulation as U.S. issuers, and the reporting, accounting, custody, and auditing standards to which those issuers are subject often are not as rigorous as U.S. standards. Investments in non-U.S. securities may also be subject to greater environmental, credit and information risks. The Fund’s investments in non-U.S. securities also are subject to non-U.S. currency fluctuations and other non-U.S. currency-related risks. Non-U.S. securities may be subject to higher volatility than U.S. securities, varying degrees of regulation and limited liquidity.
Regulatory Risk. Changes in the laws or regulations of the United States or other countries, including any changes to applicable tax laws and regulations, could impair the ability of the Fund to achieve its investment objective and could increase the operating expenses of the Fund.
Market Risk. The market value of the Fund’s investments will move up and down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based upon overall market and economic conditions, as well as a number of reasons that directly relate to the issuers of the Fund’s investments, such as management performance, financial condition and demand for the issuers’ goods and services.
Performance Information
Performance information for the Fund will be available after the Fund completes a full calendar year of operation. Past performance (before and after taxes) is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future.
Portfolio Management
Investment Adviser
The Fund’s adviser is JOHCM (USA) Inc (the “Adviser”).
 
45

Portfolio Managers
 
Bertrand Lecourt
Senior Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2022 (inception)
  
Saurabh Sharma
Fund Manager
Length of Service: Since 2022 (inception)
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
Minimum Initial Investment
 
Institutional    Advisor    Investor    Class Z
$100,000
   No minimum    No minimum    $10,000,000
There is no minimum for additional investments. If you hold shares through a financial intermediary, the financial intermediary may impose its own, different, investment minimums.
To Buy or Sell Shares:
Perpetual Americas Funds Trust
c/o The Northern Trust Company
P.O. Box 4766
Chicago, IL 60680-4766
Telephone: 866-260-9549 (toll free) or 312-557-5913
You can buy or sell shares of the Fund on any day the New York Stock Exchange (“NYSE”) is open through your broker or financial intermediary, or by mail or telephone. You can pay for shares by wire. The Adviser and Perpetual Americas Funds Distributors, LLC, the Fund’s distributor, reserve the right to waive any minimum in their sole discretion, and to reject any purchase order for any reason.
Dividends, Capital Gains and Taxes
The Fund intends to make distributions that are generally taxable as ordinary income or capital gains, except when your investment is in an IRA, 401(k), or other tax-advantaged investment plan. However, you may be subject to tax when you withdraw monies from a tax-advantaged plan.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase the Fund through a broker-dealer or other financial intermediary (such as a bank), the Fund and its related companies may pay the intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the broker-dealer or other intermediary and your salesperson to recommend the Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your financial intermediary’s web site for more information.
 
46

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES AND RISKS OF THE FUNDS
Principal Investments and Strategies of Each Fund
JOHCM Emerging Markets Discovery Fund
Investment Objective: The investment objective of the JOHCM Emerging Markets Discovery Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek long-term capital appreciation.
Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities issued by companies located in emerging markets, including frontier markets. Equity securities include common and preferred stocks, and include rights and warrants to subscribe to common stock or other equity securities. The Fund may achieve its equity exposure either directly or indirectly, such as through depositary receipts, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and participatory notes (commonly known as “P-notes”). Emerging market countries are those countries included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index and MSCI Frontier Markets Index, countries with low to middle-income economies according to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (more commonly referred to as the World Bank), and other countries with similar emerging market characteristics.
The portfolio managers seek to identify growth potential in companies that they believe are recovering (or will soon begin to recover) from market or business setbacks and therefore have the potential to outpace broader financial markets on a relative basis. Setbacks are company-, country- or sector-specific developments, which result in a negative market environment for a company’s business or the trading of its stock. Setbacks can include, among other things, failed product launches, supply chain issues, and economic or geopolitical instability in an emerging market country. In identifying those companies that they believe have the potential for recovery, the portfolio managers often seek companies with improving fundamentals and/or are taking actions to address recent or ongoing setbacks.
The portfolio managers primarily use a disciplined fundamental bottom-up research approach, namely by focusing on analyzing individual companies. As part of this approach, the portfolio managers aim to identify emerging market companies that they believe are inefficiently priced and that typically demonstrate one or more of the following positive characteristics: (1) industry players without overly significant competition and which are operating at high margins; (2) fast growing, flexible and responsive to changes; (3) able to achieve incremental gains in market share; and (4) have qualified management teams. As part of the selection process for its “discovery” strategy, the portfolio managers typically look for companies that are: (a) in emerging industries with pioneering business models, or (b) have innovative technologies that have the potential to disrupt the status quo, or (c) are offering products or services that are not yet widely available or adopted in the local market, with the potential for long-term growth.
While the portfolio managers build the Fund’s portfolio primarily from a bottom-up growth philosophy and individual stock selection process they also consider top-down macroeconomic information, particularly in determining sector and country weightings in the portfolio. The portfolio managers consider the country and sector allocation of the Fund’s performance benchmark (the MSCI Emerging Markets Small Cap Index) but may depart from the benchmark’s allocations at any time. Emerging markets are typically more volatile than developed markets; frontier markets are generally smaller, less liquid, and less developed than emerging markets. The portfolio managers believe that consideration of top-down, macroeconomic factors will reduce the overall volatility of the Fund in certain market environments (thereby protecting capital) and reduce overall risk exposure. In selecting companies for investment, the portfolio managers also consider the investment risks associated with the liquidity of the company’s stock, taking into account the depth of the trading market for the company’s shares, and how reliable the company’s reporting (particularly its financial reporting) appears to be while also seeking to take advantage of market inefficiencies as to individual companies and industries.
 
47

Under normal circumstances, the Fund will typically hold securities of 70 to 120 companies and will invest at least 80% of its assets in small and medium capitalization companies, which the Fund currently considers to be companies with market capitalizations below U.S. $8 billion. For purposes of its 80% policy as to small and medium capitalization companies, if the Fund continues to hold securities of companies whose market capitalization, subsequent to purchase, grows to exceed U.S. $8 billion, it may continue to treat them as small or medium capitalization companies. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in issuers located in one country or a small number of countries. These countries may change from time to time. The portfolio managers may consider selling a security if the portfolio managers believe that company fundamentals are deteriorating, there is increased geopolitical or economic risk in that company’s local market, or if the portfolio managers identify a security that they believe offers a better investment opportunity regardless of market capitalization. Given the portfolio managers’ investment process, the large number of holdings and the target markets in which the Fund invests, this sell discipline will typically result in annual portfolio turnover rates in excess of 100%. While the Fund does not pursue active or frequent trading as a principal strategy, the nature of the portfolio frequently results in higher levels of portfolio turnover (in excess of 100% of the average value of its portfolio on an annualized basis) when the portfolio managers implement their strategy in certain economic and market conditions.
Investments are predominantly in common stock, however, the Fund may also purchase depositary receipts (including ADRs, EDRs, and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)), convertible and non-convertible preferred stock, and participatory notes. P-notes are instruments that provide exposure to, primarily, equity securities of issuers listed on a non-U.S. exchange and are typically used when a direct investment in the underlying security is either unpermitted, restricted or uneconomical due to country-specific regulations or other restrictions. The Fund may also participate in initial public offerings (“IPO”s).
The Fund also may purchase futures contracts and other derivative contracts, including index derivatives for equities and currencies. Although the Fund did not invest significantly in derivatives instruments as of the most recent fiscal year end, it may do so at any time. The Fund also may invest in physical currencies and spot and forward currency contracts. The Fund typically does not seek to hedge its exposure to non-U.S. dollar currencies.
JOHCM Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund
Investment Objective: The investment objective of the JOHCM Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek long-term capital appreciation.
Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities of companies located in emerging market countries. Emerging market countries are those countries included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index and MSCI Frontier Markets Index, countries with low to middle-income economies according to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (more commonly referred to as the World Bank) and other countries with similar emerging market characteristics. The Fund may invest in companies of any size, including small- and mid-capitalization companies. The Fund may also invest up to 5% of its assets in frontier markets, which are generally smaller, less liquid, and less developed than emerging markets.
The equity securities in the Fund’s portfolio can include direct and indirect investments in common and preferred stocks, as well as rights and warrants to subscribe to equity securities. The Fund obtains indirect exposure to equity securities through instruments such as depositary receipts and participatory notes. Depositary receipts, such as American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”) are receipts issued by a bank or trust company evidencing ownership of underlying securities issued by a foreign issuer. Depositary receipts are alternatives to directly purchasing the underlying foreign securities in their national markets and currencies. While the Fund invests in publicly traded depositary receipts, in some cases the securities underlying the receipts are unquoted on stock exchanges.
 
48

The Fund utilizes a core investment style with a modest growth tilt (growth at a reasonable price, or “GARP”) over all capitalization ranges to invest in equity securities of companies located in emerging markets. The GARP investment strategy is a blend of growth and value investing, which seeks to find companies that have strong earnings growth at a good price. The Fund combines top-down and bottom-up research to assess potential investments in the Fund. A top-down country view represents an assessment of the investment prospects in a country (in this case, a particular emerging market country) based on macroeconomic, geopolitical and other factors affecting the country as a whole. The portfolio managers seek to invest in companies that possess attractive fundamentals (for example, a company’s revenues, earnings, or management) and that fit with the portfolio managers’ top-down country views within the emerging markets. The portfolio is managed with reference to its performance benchmark, the MSCI Emerging Markets Index, as to country and sector allocation but may depart from the benchmark’s allocations at any time. The Fund will typically own between 40 and 60 companies. The portfolio managers may consider selling a security (i) to manage overall portfolio risk, (ii) if they perceive an actual or potential deterioration in the company’s underlying business or (iii) if they identify a more attractive investment opportunity.
The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in investments located in one country or a small number of countries. These countries may change from time to time. The Fund’s performance benchmark index currently includes substantial exposure to China. The Fund may also participate in IPOs.
JOHCM Global Select Fund
Investment Objective: The investment objective of the JOHCM Global Select Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek long-term capital appreciation.
Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in common stocks and other equity securities of U.S. and non-U.S. companies, including in preferred stock, rights, and warrants. The Fund normally invests at least 40% of its assets in companies located in countries other than the U.S., provided that the Fund reserves the flexibility to invest as little as 30% of its assets in companies located outside the U.S. when market conditions are unfavorable. Notwithstanding the previous sentence, the Fund may invest a percentage lower than 40% in such non-U.S. securities if the weighting of non-U.S. securities in the Fund’s performance benchmark (currently, the MSCI ACWI Index) drops below 45%, in which case the minimum level investments in non-U.S. securities must remain within 5% of the benchmark’s weighting (e.g. if the weighting of non-U.S. securities in the Fund’s performance benchmark is 38%, the minimum level for investing in non-U.S. securities for the Fund would be 33%). Typically, the Fund invests in a number of different countries, including emerging markets. The Fund may invest in companies of any size, including small- and mid-capitalization companies, in order to achieve its objective.
The portfolio managers seek to identify and make investments based on a multi-dimensional investment process, considering a number of factors, including growth, valuation, size, momentum, and beta. Beta measures the volatility of a stock relative to the overall market. The Fund utilizes a core investment style with a growth tilt (growth at a reasonable price, or “GARP”) over all capitalization ranges, which means that the Fund generally invests in larger, more established companies, but would expect to invest a somewhat greater portion of its assets in smaller, growth companies than would a typical large cap mutual fund. The GARP investment strategy is a blend of growth and value investing and seeks to find companies that have strong earnings growth at a good price. The Fund seeks those stocks, sectors, and countries with the potential to cause positive earnings surprises, with sustainably high or increasing return on equity, and with attractive valuations. The investment process utilizes a combination of bottom-up investing and top-down asset allocation that typically results in a portfolio of 30 to 60 holdings. Bottom-up investing utilizes techniques such as fundamental analysis to assess growth and value potential of individual issuers. In conducting fundamental analysis of companies that are being considered for purchase by the Fund, the portfolio managers evaluate, among other things, the financial condition and management of a company, its industry, stability of the country in which the
 
49

company is located, and the interrelationship of these variables over time. Top-down asset allocation utilizes evaluations of, among other things, economic factors including country risk, sector trends within individual countries and regions, and currency impact.
Investments are predominantly in common stock, however the Fund also expects to gain some of its equity exposure indirectly, such as through purchasing depositary receipts (including American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)), exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and/or participatory notes. Participatory notes (commonly known as “P-notes”) are instruments that provide exposure to, primarily, equity securities of issuers listed on a non-U.S. exchange and are typically used when a direct investment in the underlying security is either unpermitted, restricted or uneconomical due to country-specific regulations or other restrictions.
The Fund may consider selling a security if the portfolio managers believe that there is an actual or potential deterioration in the company’s underlying business, its sector, or its country or if the portfolio managers identify a security that they believe offers a better investment opportunity.
JOHCM International Opportunities Fund
Investment Objective: The investment objective of the JOHCM International Opportunities Fund (the “Fund”) is to achieve long-term, risk-adjusted total return by investing in a portfolio of international equity securities.
Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund invests, under normal market conditions, primarily in equity securities of companies located outside the United States, including those located in emerging market countries. The Fund may invest in non-U.S. companies of any size, including small- and mid-capitalization companies, to achieve its objective. Equity securities include common and preferred stocks and include rights and warrants to subscribe to common stock or other equity securities. The Fund may achieve its equity exposure either directly or indirectly, such as through depositary receipts or participatory notes, though it does not use such indirect instruments for purposes of creating leverage. The Fund may invest a significant portion of its assets in investments located in one country or a small number of countries. These countries may change from time to time.
The Fund operates as a “diversified” investment company and will typically own between 25-50 holdings. The portfolio managers aim to achieve above-average risk-adjusted total returns. The portfolio managers seek to achieve this through investing in a benchmark-agnostic portfolio of what they believe to be attractively-valued, high-quality companies with lower-than-average volatility (as measured against peers or relevant indices), over the medium term of three to five years. The portfolio managers seek to assess intrinsic value of such companies based on long term competitive advantages and cash flow expectations. They prioritize companies that they believe can generate cash profits reliably over many years and have opportunities to pay dividends and/or reinvest some of those profits at high rates of return. The portfolio managers look for opportunities where the capital markets underappreciate and misprice quality characteristics and growth potential. The portfolio managers believe that many market participants underestimate the potential for change and improvement of individual companies because they focus on and extrapolate a narrow range of backward-looking metrics such as recent earnings growth and returns on capital.
The portfolio managers believe that a key risk to any investor is permanent impairment of capital from owning overvalued assets. Overvaluation may result either from strong share price performance or from a deterioration in the expected intrinsic value of the underlying business. Therefore, the Fund maintains a valuation discipline intended to ensure that assets are only bought when they are attractively valued, in absolute terms, with reference to their estimated intrinsic value, and are sold when they become overvalued on the same basis. The portfolio managers may also consider selling a security if there is a change in the company’s risk/return profile, if they identify a more attractive investment opportunity. Consistent with the Fund’s absolute valuation discipline, the portfolio managers may determine to delay reinvestment of sale proceeds or other available cash
 
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immediately, instead holding positions in cash and cash equivalents, including money market funds, potentially in an amount up to 20% of the net assets of the Fund, while examining and awaiting available investment opportunities.
Additionally, as part of the research and security selection processes, the portfolio managers ordinarily consider financially material environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) factors, that they believe have the potential to adversely affect the long-term performance of a company. In doing so, the portfolio managers conduct their own proprietary ESG analysis, in addition to having access to third-party analytics sources such as Sustainalytics and MSCI, which they may use to augment or contextualize their own analysis. The portfolio managers’ ESG analysis is conducted on a company-by-company basis and does not place greater emphasis on any particular environmental, social or governance factor. The objective of the analysis is to identify both risks, which may result in a decision not to invest, and opportunities for engagement, where the portfolio managers judge that this has the potential to yield positive outcomes by bolstering the company’s path to improvement.
JOHCM International Select Fund
Investment Objective: The investment objective of the JOHCM International Select Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek long-term capital appreciation.
Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in common stocks and other equity securities of companies located outside the United States. The Fund’s equity securities include common and preferred stock, rights, and warrants. Typically, the Fund invests in a number of different countries, including emerging markets. The Fund may invest in companies of any size, including small- and mid capitalization companies, in order to achieve its objective.
The portfolio managers seek to identify and make investments based on a multi-dimensional investment process, considering a number of factors, including growth, valuation, size, momentum, and beta. Beta measures the volatility of a stock relative to the overall market. The Fund utilizes a core investment style with a growth tilt (growth at a reasonable price, or “GARP”) over all capitalization ranges, which means that the Fund generally invests in larger, more established companies, but would expect to invest a somewhat greater portion of its assets in smaller, growth companies than would a typical large cap mutual fund. The GARP investment strategy is a blend of growth and value investing and seeks to find companies that have strong earnings growth at a good price. The Fund seeks those stocks, sectors, and countries with the potential to cause positive earnings surprises, with sustainably high or increasing return on equity, and with attractive valuations. The investment process utilizes a combination of bottom-up investing and top-down asset allocation that typically results in a portfolio of 30 to 60 holdings. Bottom-up investing utilizes techniques such as fundamental analysis to assess growth and value potential of individual issuers. In conducting fundamental analysis of companies that are being considered for purchase by the Fund, the portfolio managers evaluate, among other things, the financial condition and management of a company, its industry, stability of the country in which the company is located, and the interrelationship of these variables over time. Top-down asset allocation utilizes evaluations of, among other things, economic factors including country risk, sector trends within individual countries and regions, and currency impact.
Investments are predominantly in common stock, however the Fund also expects to gain some of its equity exposure indirectly, such as through purchasing depositary receipts (including American Depositary Receipts (“ADRs”) and Global Depositary Receipts (“GDRs”)), exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and/or participatory notes. Participatory notes (commonly known as “P-notes”) are instruments that provide exposure to, primarily, equity securities of issuers listed on a non-U.S. exchange and are typically used when a direct investment in the underlying security is either unpermitted, restricted or uneconomical due to country-specific regulations or other restrictions.
 
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The Fund may consider selling a security if the portfolio managers believe that there is an actual or potential deterioration in the company’s underlying business, its sector, or its country or if the portfolio managers identify a security that they believe offers a better investment opportunity.
Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions
Investment Objective: The investment objective of the Fund is to seek to achieve long-term capital appreciation by investing in companies that contribute solutions to addressing the world’s major social and environmental challenges.
Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in a high-conviction global equity portfolio of companies the portfolio managers believe have the potential to contribute solutions to the world’s major social and environmental challenges. The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities of companies that the portfolio managers believe satisfy their criteria for positive social or environmental impact. The Adviser measures this impact by applying the Regnan Taxonomy, as described below, in conjunction with a proprietary impact assessment, by the portfolio managers. This impact assessment is based upon qualitative and quantitative assessment, including the measurement of the activities that currently constitute, or that the portfolio managers expect over the long term will constitute, a significant portion (i.e., at least 30%) of a company’s business (using metrics that may include, without limitation, any of the following: revenues, earnings, capital expenditures, research and development investment, or book value). The Fund gains exposure to equity securities either directly or indirectly, through equity-linked instruments such as participatory notes or index exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”), and may invest in preferred stocks.
Under normal market conditions, the Fund will invest at least 40% of its assets in companies located in countries other than the U.S., including developing, frontier market or emerging market countries. Notwithstanding, the Fund may invest a percentage lower than 40% in such non-U.S. securities if the weighting of non-U.S. securities in the Fund’s performance benchmark (currently the MSCI ACWI Investable Market Index) drops below 45%, in which case the Fund’s minimum level for investments in non-U.S. securities must remain within 5% of the benchmark’s weighting (e.g. if the weighting of non-U.S. securities in the Fund’s performance benchmark is 38%, the minimum level for investing in non-U.S. securities for the Fund would be 33%). Under normal circumstances, the Fund expects to invest in a range of countries, typically at least 10 different countries. While the Fund may invest in companies of any size, the portfolio managers investment approach will typically result in a bias toward investment in small and mid-capitalization companies, including initial public offerings (“IPOs”). The Fund’s high-conviction investment approach may result in the Fund having significant exposure to one or a handful of economic sectors, however the Fund will not concentrate its investments in a particular industry.
The Fund’s investment strategy is built on the belief that companies that undertake to solve the challenges increasingly faced by the environment and society are well-positioned for growth in the future, particularly where the need for a solution to a particular challenge remains largely unmet. The portfolio managers believe that these underserved environmental and societal needs will result in demand for a product or service that is scarcely available, so companies that are able to fulfill these needs should therefore be rewarded with revenue growth over time, as the size of the market into which they sell their core products or services grows. The portfolio managers believe that this is particularly true if a company’s solution uses a degree of technological ingenuity or a differentiated approach. The portfolio managers seek to invest in companies that sell products or services that are at the early stages of their adoption, as the economic value of such products and services tends, in the portfolio managers’ view, to be underestimated by the market. Examples of such early-stage products and services might include innovative technologies for addressing environmental dangers, or online resources for supporting social change initiatives. The stage at which the portfolio managers choose to invest may vary by industry or by product, although in each case, the portfolio managers generally intend to invest before a company’s full value is recognized by the broader market.
 
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For purposes of establishing the Fund’s investment universe, the portfolio managers make use of a proprietary research framework, referred to as the Regnan Taxonomy, in an effort to gain exposure to truly mission-driven companies that are able to drive additional positive impacts through the sale of an innovative solution to a particular environmental or social problem. In identifying investment opportunities, the Regnan Taxonomy seeks to: (i) understand and identify the underlying environmental and social problems which need to be addressed; (ii) identify the products and services that contribute to finding solutions to these problems; and (iii) identify suitable companies that are selling these products and services. In identifying the underlying environmental and social problems to be addressed, the Regnan Taxonomy draws on the targets that underlie the 17 United Nations Sustainable Development Goals (the “UN SDGs”). The 17 SDGs, which were primarily intended for the use of policy-makers, are broad goals underpinned by 169 actionable targets. Some of these targets, or actionable problems, can be matched to a corporate product or service that helps to achieve this sustainability target. The Adviser undertakes research to identify companies producing these products and services, and which are investable via listed equity on recognized exchanges. The UN SDGs may change over time, and the Regnan Taxonomy may also incorporate other goals linked to other sustainability frameworks as determined by the Adviser. The Regnan Taxonomy uses proprietary research to determine which companies derive a significant portion of their revenue from producing the products and services that contribute to finding solutions to these problems.
Once the investment universe is established, the portfolio managers undertake a qualitative analysis to understand the size, in revenue terms, of the total addressable market for these products and services and where in the value chain companies may have a chance to create lasting value. As part of this analysis, the portfolio managers conduct research on the products and services, and the technologies that underlie them to determine which may have a forecastable and substantial potential for economic profit growth over a five to ten year time horizon. The portfolio managers then perform impact assessments involving fundamental analyses of companies within the investment universe to evaluate their potential to drive a positive impact in the future. The Adviser, per the Regnan Taxonomy, defines a positive impact as an impact that contributes to one or more of the UN SDGs or other goals linked to sustainability frameworks that the Adviser deems to be pertinent. The magnitude of a company’s impact is assessed using the portfolio managers’ integrated analysis, which incorporates consideration, where available, of pre-selected key performance indicators that the portfolio managers believe to be indicative of the company’s progress toward achieving the applicable sustainability framework goals. These key performance indicators may not always be available for a specific company or a specific sustainability goal and are expected to change over time. The portfolio managers’ analysis of relevant key performance indicators accounts for both quantitative and qualitative information and is typically based to a significant degree on a company’s own reporting but may also utilize a range of other data sources, including academic research. These impact assessments typically include analysis of the following attributes:
 
  1.
Nature – an assessment of whether the product or service under review is directly responsible for driving a positive impact.
 
  2.
Intentionality – an assessment as to how central the particular product or service is to the company’s mission to drive a positive impact.
 
  3.
Additionality – an assessment of the additional positive impact that is created by the company’s product or service, and involves answering the question of whether this positive impact would indeed have occurred, had the company’s particular offering not existed.
 
  4.
Balance – an assessment of the material and potential negative impacts, whether generated by the product or service itself, the company’s operations or by a supplier or customer of the company, and how these negative externalities balance out or offset the positive impact of the product or service being sold by the company.
 
  5.
Directionality – an assessment of the trajectory of the company’s net impact.
Building on its impact assessment, the portfolio managers then undertake a comprehensive value analysis and a risk assessment. The value analysis looks at the total economic value that each holding is expected to generate
 
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and whether the value is distributed equitably to all stakeholders associated with the particular company. A company’s total value production is assessed by a number of factors, including reference to a company’s financial reporting as well as quantitative reporting by third party data providers. In assessing the equitable distribution of value, the portfolio managers consider factors such as how a company has historically allocated the cash it has generated, including choices about how stakeholders are compensated, how staff are treated, the composition of the company’s board, the company’s history of tax compliance or avoidance, the company’s workplace safety record and the company’s investment in human capital, among other factors generally intended to assist the portfolio managers in forming a qualitative understanding of the company’s overall culture. By focusing on the experience of a company’s ‘stakeholders’, the portfolio managers look beyond the immediate economic effect of the company’s activities on its current financial statements and shareholder equity. The portfolio managers believe, however, that an equitable distribution of the value a firm generates among all stakeholders is critical to long-term, sustainable growth and the creation of economic value for shareholders over time.
The risk assessment seeks to identify the key risks that could potentially derail the company, what kinds and levels of risks are acceptable, how the risks can be monitored, and whether the company could be encouraged to address the risks through the portfolio managers’ engagement with the company. The portfolio managers intend to conduct company engagement directly, on an ongoing basis, in an effort to help companies reduce negative operational impacts, while also working with them to increase positive impact. The portfolio managers’ goal, through engagement with the Fund’s portfolio companies, is to align impact with long-term capital growth.
The intended outcome of the portfolio managers’ investment process is a portfolio that typically consists of between 25 and 50 companies. The portfolio managers select companies without regard to the Fund’s performance benchmark and expects to depart significantly from the holdings and weightings in that benchmark. The portfolio managers add issuers to the Fund’s portfolio typically with the intention of holding the securities for longer periods (typically at least 5 years), which is expected to result in a relatively low portfolio turnover rate that aligns with the Fund’s long-term investment outlook.
The portfolio managers will consider selling an investment under one or more of the following conditions: (1) a change or development invalidates the investment case or implies the company would no longer pass the impact assessment, (2) the portfolio managers identify a company that they believe offers a better impact solution or that they believe has a valuation that offers better risk- reward, (3) the portfolio managers’ trust in the company is damaged and/or the company is no longer willing to engage, or (4) the company is no longer undervalued, in the portfolio managers’ view.
The Fund may also enter into derivatives transactions and various other hedging assets that the portfolio managers believe will reduce the overall volatility of the Fund in certain market environments (thereby protecting capital) and reduce risk exposures. Such hedging assets may include, but are not limited to: exchange-traded funds and commodity-linked investment vehicles that primarily invest in gold and precious metals; inflation-linked investments; currency hedging instruments such as currency forward contracts and currency futures; futures contracts, including interest-rate futures, which are exchange- traded contracts in which the specified underlying security is either an interest-bearing fixed income security or an inter-bank deposit, Treasury futures, and “e-mini” futures contracts representing a fraction of the value of a corresponding standard futures contract; and options on futures contracts. Although the Fund did not invest significantly in derivatives instruments as of the most recent fiscal year end, it may do so at any time.
Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund
Investment Objective: The investment objective of Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund (the “Fund”) is to seek to achieve long-term capital appreciation by investing in a global equity portfolio of companies along the water and waste value chains.
 
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Principal Investment Strategies: The Fund seeks to achieve its investment objective by investing primarily in a global equity portfolio of companies the portfolio managers believe, based on such companies’ activities and public disclosures, have the potential to contribute solutions to global water- or waste-related challenges and which satisfy their criteria for possessing sustainable attributes (as described further below).
The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets (plus the amount of any borrowings for investment purposes) in equity securities of companies that have a material business involvement in water or waste solutions and that meet the portfolio managers’ sustainability criteria. The portfolio managers consider business involvement in water or waste solutions to be material if at least 50% of a company’s activities (as measured by sales, earnings, or similar metrics) are derived from a product or service in the water or waste value chain that addresses water or waste solutions. The water value chain is the range of activities implicated in the transport, management and use of water. The waste value chain is the range of activities implicated in the transport, storage and management of waste in any of its forms (whether liquid, solid or gas).
 
   
Water solutions include, but are not limited to water production; water conditioning and desalination; water supply; water treatment, transport, and dispatching; treatment of wastewater; water infrastructure equipment and services; water-related construction; and related consulting and engineering services as well as other related services or industries.
 
   
Waste solutions include, but are not limited to waste collection, transporting, sorting, and recycling; sewage treatment plants; hazardous waste management; air filtering and cleaning; sanitization; site remediation; pollution prevention and control; sustainable packaging; environment planning; as well as consulting, engineering and other services related to the foregoing.
The portfolio managers monitor around 350 companies that make up the Fund’s current investment universe and seek to identify companies along the water and waste value chains that, in their opinion, provide solutions to global water- or waste-related challenges. The portfolio managers consider water-related challenges to include but not be limited to: improving access to drinking water, repairing and maintaining water transportation infrastructure and advancing water treatment processes. The portfolio managers consider waste-related challenges to include but not be limited to: improving waste management safety and efficiency and finding sustainable solutions to capacity constraints relating to the management of waste in any of its forms.
The portfolio managers analyze specific companies through a rigorous stock-selection process that simultaneously combines bottom-up analysis of business quality, a valuation assessment of absolute upside potential and ESG research to construct a portfolio that normally holds between 35 and 50 stocks. The bottom-up analysis includes considerations such as revenue model analysis, profit analysis, history of cash generation, and balance sheet assessment to assess the valuation and appropriateness of candidates for inclusion in the portfolio. In identifying potential investments, the portfolio managers ordinarily look for companies that exhibit some or all of the following characteristics: a focus on the waste and water investment theme, a strong market position of such company within its sector, a sustainable business model, high quality management, a strong balance sheet, including the company’s ability to satisfy its short-term liabilities, and a demonstrated history of cash generation. The investment process does not target any particular allocation as between water solutions and waste solutions, and the mix of investments as between those two themes can vary significantly over time. The portfolio managers typically intend to hold investments for 3-5 years or more. Although the Fund is a global, unconstrained Fund which can invest in emerging markets and frontier markets as well as developed markets—and while the Fund does not apply a minimum or maximum limit on exposure to any single country—it is expected that the majority of the Fund’s holdings will be located in developed markets. The Fund has the flexibility to invest in companies at any market capitalization.
ESG Screening
The portfolio managers apply an enhanced principles-based ESG exclusion policy to screen out certain companies or practices based on specific ESG criteria they identify. A norms-based screening component
 
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excludes any company which the portfolio managers consider to have failed to conduct its business in accordance with accepted international norms, as set out in the United Nations Global Compact (including human rights, labor rights, environment, and anti-corruption). Additionally, a negative screening component excludes companies which have exposure to certain sectors, issuers or securities. The below list includes the negative screening criteria applied to all investments of the Fund:
 
   
Derive 5% or more of their revenue from the extraction, exploration, or distribution of coal, or from thermal coal power generation.
 
   
Derive 5% or more of their total revenue from the extraction, exploration, distribution, or refinement of oil and/or natural gas, unless a science-based target is in place.
 
   
Derive 5% or more of their total revenue from unconventional oil and gas products and services, including hydraulic fracturing, oil/tar sands, shale oil and/or gas, coal seam methane and Arctic drilling.
 
   
Derive 5% or more of their total revenue from mining of uranium for the purpose of nuclear power generation, the generation of nuclear power, or the provision of products and services to the nuclear power industry.
 
   
Derive 5% or more of their total revenue from the production or distribution of tobacco, or related services (including tobacco-related products).
 
   
Derive any revenue from manufacture of controversial weapons (such as anti-personnel mines, biological or chemical weapons, cluster munitions, depleted uranium weapons, nuclear weapons, white phosphorous weapons).
 
   
Derive any revenue from distribution of, or related services to producers of, controversial weapons.
 
   
Derive 5% or more of their total revenue from manufacture, or provision of related services to, conventional weapons or armaments.
 
   
Breach the United Nations Global Compact principles, where the breach is categorized by Institutional Shareholder Services as structural and severe.
Sustainability
The portfolio managers then use both quantitative and qualitative factors to form an assessment of a company’s “sustainable” attributes, including for example audit data, workplace health and safety and remuneration. A company is considered to maintain sustainable attributes where the company meets minimum standards of environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) risk and sustainability management, as assessed by the portfolio managers. The portfolio managers will invest a minimum of 70% of the Fund’s net assets in companies which are maintaining sustainable attributes and a maximum of 30% of the Fund’s net assets in companies which demonstrate improving sustainable attributes.
This sustainability assessment uses a combination of measurements, including, but not limited to, ESG ratings provided by Morgan Stanley Capital International (“MSCI”) and the Adviser’s proprietary internal sustainability ratings, which is a bottom-up analysis of ESG factors undertaken by experienced specialists. The methodology has been designed to promote comprehensive evaluation of ESG factors while also providing flexibility to incorporate company-specific considerations. The Adviser assigns a score from 1-5 for each ESG factor (“E,” “S” and “G”) based on its assessment of the extent to which sustainability management contributes to sustained value creation. A company’s overall ESG score aggregates the “E”, “S”, and “G” factor scores.
Companies rated BBB and above on MSCI’s ESG ratings are defined by the Adviser as maintaining sustainable attributes. Where an MSCI ESG rating is not available, companies rated above 2.5 by the Adviser’s proprietary rating system are defined as maintaining sustainable attributes.
 
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For the remaining companies, the Adviser assigns each such company a momentum assessment classification (“stable”, “improving” or “weakening”) to indicate the expected direction of change in the company’s overall ESG score. Companies classified as improving (which includes companies that the portfolio managers perceive to demonstrate positive momentum in ESG/sustainability management, and takes into account trends in internal and/or external ratings) and companies which demonstrate the potential for improvement (based on the portfolio managers’ assessment of factors that they believe may positively impact a company’s management of ESG) are collectively defined by the portfolio managers as demonstrating improving sustainable attributes.
The portfolio managers will seek to sell an investment if one of the following conditions has been met: (1) a change or development invalidates the investment case or implies the company would no longer pass the sustainability assessment, (2) they have identified a company that they believe offers a better solution to global water- or waste-related challenges or that they believe has a valuation that offers better risk-reward, (3) their trust in the company is damaged and/or the company is no longer willing to engage, or (4) the portfolio managers perceive that their long-term investment thesis for the holding is no longer valid.
Although the Fund does not expect to invest significantly in derivative instruments and generally does not hedge currency, it may do so at any time depending on market performance.
The Fund may invest in affiliated or unaffiliated investment companies, including exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”). The Fund may also participate in initial public offerings (“IPOs”)
More Information about Investment Strategies Related to the Funds
In addition to the investments and strategies described in this prospectus, each Fund also may invest to a lesser extent in other securities, use other strategies, and engage in other investment practices that are not part of its principal investment strategy. These investments and strategies, as well as those described in this prospectus, are described in detail in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) (for information on how to obtain a copy of the SAI see the back cover of this prospectus). Of course, there is no guarantee that the Funds will achieve their investment goals.
The investments and strategies described in this prospectus are those that the Funds use under normal conditions. During unusual economic or market conditions, or in the event of sizeable cash flows into or out of a Fund, each Fund may invest up to 100% of its assets in money market instruments and other cash equivalents that would not ordinarily be consistent with its investment objective or its other investment policies. If a Fund invests in this manner, it may not achieve its investment objective.
In addition to its principal investment strategies, a Fund may use the investment strategies described below. A Fund may also employ investment practices that this prospectus does not describe, such as participating in repurchase agreements, when-issued and forward commitment transactions, lending of securities, borrowing and other techniques. For more information concerning these and the Funds’ other investment practices and their risks, you should read the SAI.
Temporary Defensive Strategies. The Funds seek to remain fully invested in accordance with their respective investment objectives. However, in an attempt to respond to adverse market, economic, political, or other conditions, a Fund may take a temporary defensive position that is inconsistent with its principal investment strategies. These defensive positions may include investments in cash, commercial paper, money market instruments, repurchase agreements, and U.S. Government securities. Taking a temporary defensive position could prevent a Fund from achieving its investment objective.
Name Policy. Each Fund, except JOHCM Global Select Fund, JOHCM International Select Fund and the JOHCM International Opportunities Fund, has a policy to invest, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of the value of its “assets” in certain types of investments suggested by its name (the “80% Policy”). Each Fund’s
 
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80% Policy is set forth in the SAI. Additional detail regarding the implementation of the policy is included in the “Fund Summary” section of this prospectus. A Fund must comply with its 80% Policy at the time the Fund invests its assets. Accordingly, when a Fund no longer meets its 80% Policy requirement as a result of circumstances beyond its control, such as changes in the value of portfolio holdings, it would not have to sell its holdings, but any new investments it makes would need to be consistent with its 80% Policy. Each Fund’s 80% Policy is non-fundamental and can be changed by the Fund’s Board of Trustees without shareholder approval. A Fund will provide shareholders with at least 60 days’ prior notice of any changes to the Fund’s 80% Policy.
Location of Issuers. A number of the Funds’ policies are determined by reference to whether an issuer is “located in” a particular country or group of countries or whether the issuer is located outside the U.S. more generally. Being “located in” a particular country reflects a judgment that an issuer is economically tied to that country, and in determining where an issuer is located for these purposes the Adviser will consider a number of factors, including but not limited to:
 
   
the markets in which the issuer’s securities are principally traded;
 
   
where the issuer’s headquarters, principal offices or operations are located;
 
   
where the issuer is organized;
 
   
the percentage of the issuer’s revenues or profits derived from goods produced or sold, investments made, or services performed in the relevant country;
 
   
the Adviser’s own internal analysis; and
 
   
information provided by third party data analytics service providers.
No single factor will necessarily be determinative nor must all factors be present for the Adviser to determine where an issuer is located. The Adviser may weigh these factors differently with respect to different geographic policies, different countries or different series of the Trust. The categorization of location of issuer for compliance testing purposes with respect to the Funds may differ from how other or different portfolio managers, investment professionals, or third parties assign the location of individual issuers.
Line of Credit and Borrowings. The Trust, on behalf of certain of the Funds, has entered into a $100 million revolving credit facility agreement (the “Credit Agreement”) with Northern Trust for liquidity or for other temporary or emergency purposes.
The Credit Agreement permits the Funds to borrow up to an aggregate amount of $100 million, $50 million of which is committed and $50 million of which is uncommitted at any time outstanding, subject to asset coverage and other limitations as specified in the Credit Agreement. Borrowing results in interest expense and other fees and expenses that may impact the Funds’ expenses, including any net expense ratios. The costs of borrowing may reduce the total returns for a Fund. The Credit Agreement also imposes an ongoing commitment fee on undrawn committed amounts under the credit facility, which is allocated to between the Funds, and, within each Fund, to each share class, on a pro rata basis, based on such Fund’s (or such share classes, as appropriate) average daily net asset value.
Cash-Sweep Program. The Funds may invest in a cash-sweep program administered by the Northern Trust Company, the Funds’ Administrator, through which a Fund’s cash holdings are placed in the Northern Institutional Funds Treasury Portfolio (the “Cash Sweep Portfolio”) a money market fund pursuant to Rule 2a-7 of the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). All sweep vehicles, whether or not registered under the 1940 Act, carry certain risks. For example, money market fund sweep vehicle, such as the Cash Sweep Portfolio, are subject to market risks and are not subject to FDIC protection. As a shareholder of the Cash Sweep Portfolio, a Fund would bear, along with other shareholders, its pro rata portion of the Cash Sweep Portfolio’s expenses, including any advisory and administrative fees. These expenses would be in addition to the advisory and other expenses that a Fund bears directly in connection with its own operations.
 
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ESG Diligence Process. To determine whether an issuer meets the Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund’s criteria for possessing a given environmental, social and governance attribute, a suite of core factors promotes comprehensive evaluation while also providing flexibility to incorporate company specific and novel considerations for each environmental, social or governance theme. Environmental factors include, for example, climate transition, physical impacts of climate change, water security and other environmental management. Social factors include, for example, human capital management and workplace health and safety. Governance factors include, for example, ethical conduct, board skills, structures and management, audit data, remuneration and other corporate governance.
Each new investment is assigned an MSCI ESG rating and/or a Sustainable Value Assessment (“SVA”), an internal ESG assessment. In producing ratings, the Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund draws on a broad range of public data sources, such as company filings, MSCI ESG ratings and third-party data providers such as Sustainalytics, a leading independent ESG analytics firm. This enables the Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund to form of views on ESG performance both from the company’s own reporting and from external stakeholders. SVA ratings for all stocks within the portfolio are updated on at least an annual basis, and can be initiated more frequently in response to new information deemed material to the current rating. Factors that might lead to such a rating include, for example, updates to corporate strategy, regulatory changes, legal developments, acquisitions or divestments, and board changes.
Emerging Markets. A number of Funds invest in companies located in emerging markets as part of their principal investment strategies. Unless otherwise stated in a Fund’s principal investment strategy, the Funds define emerging markets countries as those countries included in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index and MSCI Frontier Markets Index, countries with low to middle-income economies according to the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (more commonly referred to as the World Bank) and other countries with similar emerging market characteristics.
Seed Capital Investments into the Funds. From time to time, the Adviser and/or its affiliates may invest “seed capital” in a Fund. These investments are generally intended to enable a Fund or a share class of the Fund to commence investment operations and/or achieve sufficient scale to implement the Fund’s principal investment strategy. The Adviser and/or its affiliates are under no obligation to maintain any particular level of seed capital investments in a Fund, and they can redeem their investments at any time and without prior notice. As with redemptions by other large shareholders, redemptions of seed capital could have a significant negative impact on a Fund, including on the liquidity of the Fund’s investment portfolio and the net asset value (“NAV”) of the Fund shares. The form of a seed investor’s contribution and any redemption activity by a seed investor can affect, including adversely, the tax efficiency of a Fund.
When the Adviser or an affiliate provides “seed capital” or other capital for a Fund, it may do so with the intention of redeeming all or part of its interest in the Fund at a future point in time or when it deems that sufficient additional capital has been invested in that Fund. The timing of a redemption of seed capital could benefit the seed investor and create a conflict for the Adviser if the seed investor’s interests diverge from those of a Fund. For example, the seed investor may choose to redeem its shares at a time when a Fund’s portfolio is more liquid than at times when other investors may wish to redeem all or part of their interests. In addition, a consequence of any redemption of a significant amount, including redemption activity by a seed investor, is that investors remaining in a Fund will bear a proportionately higher share of Fund expenses following the redemption.
The Adviser and/or its affiliates may vote proxies (and have voted proxies in the past) for the shares they have received in exchange for seed capital. If seed capital investments account for a significant portion of a Fund’s outstanding shares, the Adviser and/or its affiliates may have the ability to determine the outcome of any matter affecting and voted on by shareholders of the Fund.
 
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Summary of Principal Risks
Any investment in the Funds is subject to investment risks, including the possible loss of the principal amount invested. Below are the principal risks of the Funds in alphabetical order. The significance of any specific risk to an investment in a Fund will vary over time, depending on the composition of the Fund’s portfolio, market conditions, and other factors. Your investment in a Fund may be subject (in varying degrees) to the following risks discussed below. Each Fund may be more susceptible to some of the risks than others and not all risks will be applicable to all Funds. You should read all of the risk information for your Fund presented below carefully, because any one or more of these risks may result in losses to the Fund.
Asset Allocation Risk. The risk that if a Fund’s strategy for allocating assets among different asset classes does not work as intended, the Fund may not achieve its objective or may underperform other funds with similar investment strategies.
China Risk. To the extent a Fund invests in securities of Chinese issuers, it may be subject to certain risks and considerations not typically associated with investing in securities of U.S. issuers, including, among others, more frequent trading suspensions and government interventions (including by nationalization of assets), currency exchange rate fluctuations or blockages, limits on the use of brokers and on non-U.S. ownership, variable interest entities (“VIEs”) risks, different financial reporting standards, higher dependence on exports and international trade, potential for increased trade tariffs, embargoes and other trade limitations, and custody risks. U.S. or non-U.S. government sanctions or other government’s interventions could preclude a Fund from making certain investments in China or result in a Fund selling investments in China at disadvantageous times or prices. Significant portions of the Chinese securities markets may become rapidly illiquid, as Chinese issuers have the ability to suspend the trading of their equity securities, and have shown a willingness to exercise that option in response to market volatility and other events.
Additionally, in China, U.S. ownership of Chinese companies in certain sectors (including by U.S. persons and entities, inclusive of U.S. mutual funds) is prohibited. In order to facilitate non-U.S. investment, many Chinese companies have created VIEs that allow non-U.S. investors, through the use of contractual arrangements, to both exert a degree of control and to obtain substantially all of the economic benefits arising from a company without formal legal ownership. Although VIEs are a longstanding industry practice and have been well known to Chinese officials and regulators, they have not been formally recognized under Chinese law. If the Chinese companies (or their officers, directors, or Chinese equity holders) breached their contracts or if Chinese officials and/or regulators withdraw their implicit acceptance of the VIE structure or if new laws, rules or regulations relating to VIE structures are adopted U.S. investors could suffer substantial, detrimental, and possibly permanent effects with little or no recourse available. VIE structures do not offer the same level of investor protections as direct ownership. Investors may experience losses if VIE structures are altered or disputes emerge over control of the VIE. In December, 2021, the China Securities Regulatory Commission and China’s National Development and Reform Commission published draft rules that, if declared effective, will establish a new regulatory framework for VIEs. These proposed rules acknowledge VIEs for the first time and propose the tightening of regulations around VIEs, however not all details on how these new regulations would work in practice are clear at this stage. It remains unclear whether any new laws, rules, or regulations relating to VIE structures will be adopted or, if adopted, what impact they would have on the interests of foreign shareholders.
CLO Risk. Collateralized loan obligations (“CLOs”) issue classes or “tranches” that vary in risk and yield and may experience substantial losses due to actual defaults, decrease of market value due to collateral defaults and removal of subordinate tranches, market anticipation of defaults and investor aversion to CLO securities as a class. The risks of investing in CLOs depend largely on the tranche and the type of the underlying debts and loans in the tranche. Investments in subordinate tranches may carry greater risk. CLOs also carry risks including, but not limited to, interest rate risk and credit risk. Because the underlying assets in CLOs are loans, in the event an underlying loan is subject to liquidity risks such as the risk of extended settlement, investments in the corresponding CLOs may be indirectly subject to the same risks.
 
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Convertible Securities Risk. Convertible securities subject a Fund to the risks associated with both fixed-income securities and equity securities. If a convertible security’s investment value is greater than its conversion value, its price will likely increase when interest rates fall and decrease when interest rates rise. If the conversion value exceeds the investment value, the price of the convertible security will tend to fluctuate directly with the price of the underlying equity security. Certain “triggering events” may cause a Fund to lose the principal amount invested in a contingent convertible security and coupon payments on contingent convertible securities may be discretionary and cancelled by the issuer. Due to these factors, the value of contingent convertible securities is unpredictable, and holders of contingent convertible securities may suffer a loss of capital when comparable equity holders do not.
Credit Risk. Credit risk is the risk that an issuer, guarantor or liquidity provider of a fixed-income security held by a Fund may be unable or unwilling, or may be perceived (whether by market participants, ratings agencies, pricing services or otherwise) as unable or unwilling, to make timely principal and/or interest payments, or to otherwise honor its obligations. It includes the risk that the security will be downgraded by a credit rating agency; generally, lower credit quality issuers present higher credit risks. An actual or perceived decline in creditworthiness of an issuer of a fixed-income security held by a Fund may result in a decrease in the value of the security. It is possible that the ability of an issuer to meet its obligations will decline substantially during the period when a Fund owns securities of the issuer or that the issuer will default on its obligations or that the obligations of the issuer will be limited or restructured.
The credit rating assigned to any particular investment does not necessarily reflect the issuer’s current financial condition and does not reflect an assessment of an investment’s volatility or liquidity. Securities rated in the lowest category of investment grade are considered to have speculative characteristics. If a security held by a Fund loses its rating or its rating is downgraded, a Fund may nonetheless continue to hold the security in the discretion of the Adviser. In the case of asset-backed or mortgage-related securities, changes in the actual or perceived ability of the obligors on the underlying assets or mortgages to make payments of interest and/or principal may affect the values of those securities.
Currency Risk. A significant portion of a Fund’s assets may be denominated in non-U.S. (non-U.S.) currencies. There is the risk that the value of such assets and/or the value of any distributions from such assets may decrease if the currency in which such assets are priced or in which they make distributions falls in relation to the value of the U.S. dollar. Some emerging markets countries may have fixed or managed currencies that are not free-floating against the U.S. dollar. A Fund is not required to hedge its non-U.S. currency risk, although it may do so through non-U.S. currency exchange contracts and other methods. Therefore, to the extent a Fund does not hedge its non-U.S. currency risk, or the hedges are ineffective, the value of a Fund’s assets and income could be adversely affected by currency exchange rate movements.
Cybersecurity Risk. The computer systems, networks, and devices used by a Fund and their service providers to carry out routine business operations employ a variety of protections designed to prevent damage or interruption from computer viruses, network failures, computer and telecommunication failures, infiltration by unauthorized persons, and security breaches. Despite the various protections utilized by a Fund and its service providers, systems, networks, or devices potentially can be breached. The Funds and their shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result of a cybersecurity breach.
Cybersecurity breaches can include unauthorized access to systems, networks, or devices; infection from computer viruses or other malicious software code; and attacks that shut down, disable, slow, or otherwise disrupt operations, business processes, or website access or functionality. Cybersecurity breaches may cause disruptions and impact the Funds’ business operations, potentially resulting in financial losses; interference with a Fund’s ability to calculate its NAV; impediments to trading; the inability of the Funds, the Adviser and other service providers to transact business; violations of applicable privacy and other laws; regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs, or additional compliance costs; as well as the inadvertent release of confidential information. Any problems relating to the performance and effectiveness of security procedures used by a Fund or its service providers to protect the Fund’s assets, such as algorithms,
 
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codes, passwords, multiple signature systems, encryption and telephone call-backs, may have an adverse impact on a Fund or its investors. Furthermore, as a Fund’s assets grow, it may become a more appealing target for cybersecurity threats such as hackers and malware.
Similar adverse consequences could result from cybersecurity breaches affecting issuers of securities in which the Funds invest; counterparties with which the Funds engage in transactions; governmental and other regulatory authorities; exchange and other financial market operators, banks, brokers, dealers, insurance companies, and other financial institutions (including financial intermediaries and service providers for the Funds’ shareholders); and other parties. In addition, substantial costs may be incurred by these entities in order to prevent any cybersecurity breaches in the future.
Depositary Receipts. Depositary receipts may be sponsored or unsponsored. Although the two types of depositary receipt facilities are similar, there are differences regarding a holder’s rights and obligations and the practices of market participants. Holders of unsponsored depositary receipts generally bear all the costs of the facility. The depositary usually charges fees upon the deposit and withdrawal of the underlying securities, the conversion of dividends into U.S. dollars or other currency, the disposition of non-cash distributions, and the performance of other services. The depositary of an unsponsored facility frequently is under no obligation to distribute shareholder communications received from the underlying issuer or to pass through voting rights with respect to the underlying securities to depositary receipt holders. With sponsored facilities, the underlying issuer typically bears some of the costs of the depositary receipts (such as dividend payment fees of the depositary), although most sponsored depositary receipt holders may bear costs such as deposit and withdrawal fees. Depositaries of most sponsored depositary receipts agree to distribute notices of shareholder meetings, voting instructions, and other shareholder communications and financial information to the depositary receipt holders at the underlying issuer’s request. Some Funds may also invest in certain depositary receipts without voting rights, for example, Thai non-voting depositary receipts (“NVDRs”). NVDRs are similar to other depositary receipts except that they do not allow the holder to participate in company decision making through voting. See Investment Strategies and Risks – Depositary Receipts in the Funds’ Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”) for additional information.
Derivatives Risk. A derivative is an instrument with a value based on the performance of an underlying financial asset, index, or other measure. The types of derivatives that might be used by a Fund may include futures and forward contracts, options, swaps, and other similar instruments. The use of derivative contracts may involve risks different from, or greater than, the risks associated with investing in more traditional investments, such as stocks and bonds. These risks include: (i) the risk that the counterparty to a derivative transaction may not fulfill its contractual obligations; (ii) the risk of mispricing or improper valuation; and (iii) the risk that changes in the value of the derivative may not correlate perfectly with the underlying asset, rate, or index. Derivatives can be complex and may perform in ways unanticipated by the Adviser. Derivatives may be volatile, difficult to value, and a Fund may not be able to close out or sell a derivative position at a particular time or at an anticipated price.
Equity Securities Risk. Equity securities represent an ownership interest, or the right to acquire an ownership interest, in an issuer. Equity securities include both direct and indirect investments in such ownership interests, such as public and privately issued equity securities and common and preferred stocks, warrants and rights to subscribe to common stock or other equity securities, convertible securities, and derivative instruments that are expected or intended to track the price movement of equity indices. Different types of equity securities (including different types of instruments that provide direct or indirect exposure to ownership interests in issuers) provide different voting and dividend rights and priority in the event of a bankruptcy and/or insolvency of the issuer. In general, investments in equity securities and equity derivatives are subject to market risks that may cause their prices to fluctuate over time. The value of securities convertible into equity securities, such as warrants or convertible debt, is also affected by prevailing interest rates, the credit quality of the issuer and any call provision. Fluctuations in the value of equity securities in which a mutual fund invests will cause a Fund’s net asset value to fluctuate. Historically, the equity markets have moved in cycles, and the value of a Fund’s equity securities may fluctuate drastically from day-to-day. Individual companies may report poor results or be
 
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negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments. The prices of securities issued by such companies may suffer a decline in response. An investment in a portfolio of equity securities may be more suitable for long-term investors who can bear the risk of these share price fluctuations.
Emerging Markets Risk. Investing in emerging market securities magnifies the risks inherent in non-U.S. investments. In addition to the risks of investing in non-U.S. investments generally, emerging markets investments are subject to greater risks arising from political or economic instability, nationalization or confiscatory taxation, currency exchange restrictions, tariffs and other sanctions by other countries (such as the United States) and an issuer’s unwillingness or inability to make principal or interest payments on its obligations. Geopolitical events such as nationalization or expropriation could even cause the loss of the Fund’s entire investment in one or more countries. In addition, pandemics and outbreaks of contagious diseases may exacerbate pre-existing problems in emerging market countries with less established healthcare systems. Emerging markets companies may be smaller and have shorter operating histories than companies in developed markets. To the extent a Fund invests in frontier countries, these risks will be magnified. Frontier countries generally have smaller economies or less developed capital markets than traditional emerging market countries.
Some countries with emerging securities markets have experienced substantial, and in some periods extremely high, rates of inflation for many years. Inflation and rapid fluctuations in inflation rates have had and may continue to have negative effects on the economies and securities markets of certain countries. Moreover, the economies of some countries may differ favorably or unfavorably from the U.S. economy in such respects as rate of growth of gross domestic product, rate of inflation, capital reinvestment, resource self-sufficiency, number and depth of industries forming the economy’s base, condition and stability of financial institutions, governmental controls, and investment restrictions that are subject to political change and balance of payments position. Issuers of non-U.S. securities (particularly those tied economically to emerging countries) often are not subject to as much regulation as U.S. issuers, and the reporting, accounting, custody, and auditing standards to which those issuers are subject often are not as rigorous as U.S. standards. Further, a Fund may face greater difficulties or restrictions with respect to investments made in emerging markets countries than in the United States. Satisfactory custodial services may not be available in some emerging markets countries, which may result in a Fund incurring additional costs and delays in the transportation and custody of such securities. A sub-set of emerging markets, frontier markets, are less developed than other emerging markets and are the most speculative. They have the least number of investors and may not have a stock market on which to trade. Most frontier markets consist chiefly of stocks of financial, telecommunications, and consumer companies that count on monthly payments from customers. Investments in this sector are typically illiquid, nontransparent, and subject to very low levels of regulation and high transaction fees. Frontier market investments may be subject to substantial political and currency risk. The risk of investing in frontier markets can be increased due to government ownership or control of parts of private sector and of certain companies; trade barriers, exchange controls, managed adjustments in relative currency values, and other protectionist measures imposed or negotiated by frontier market countries or their trading partners; and the relatively new and unsettled securities laws in many frontier market countries. These risks can result in the potential for extreme price volatility.
Equity-Linked Instruments Risk. There is a risk that, in addition to market risk and other risks of the referenced equity security, a Fund may experience a return that is different from that of the referenced equity security. Equity-linked instruments also subject a Fund to counterparty risk, including the risk that the issuing entity may not be able to honor its financial commitment, which could result in a loss of all or part of a Fund’s investment.
ESG Factor Risk. To the extent portfolio managers of a Fund incorporate environmental, social and/or governance considerations (“ESG factors”) into their investment process, the Fund will be subject to risks associated with the relevant ESG factors. Environmental performance criteria rate a company’s management of its environmental challenges, including its effort to reduce or offset the impacts of its products and operations. Social criteria measure how well a company manages its impact on the communities where it operates, including its treatment of local populations, its handling of human rights issues, its record regarding labor-management relations, anti-discrimination policies and practices, employee safety and the quality and safety record of a
 
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company’s products, its marketing practices and any involvement in regulatory or anti-competitive controversies. Governance criteria address a company’s investor relations and management practices, including company sustainability reporting, board accountability and business ethics policies and practices.
In general, use of ESG factors in the securities selection process will affect a Fund’s exposure to certain issuers, industries, sectors, regions, and countries; may lead to a smaller universe of investments than other funds that do not incorporate ESG factor analysis; and may negatively impact the relative performance of the Fund over the short, medium or even long term depending on how successfully those ESG factors are incorporated and whether such investments are in or out of favor.
Successful incorporation of ESG factors into a Fund’s overall investment strategy will depend on its portfolio managers’ ability to identify and analyze financially material ESG issues, and there can be no assurance that the strategy or techniques employed will be successful.
ETF Risk. In addition to the risks associated with the underlying assets held by an ETF, investments in ETFs may be subject to the following additional risks: (1) the market price of an ETF’s shares may trade above or below its net asset value; (2) an active trading market for the ETF’s shares may not develop or be maintained; (3) trading an ETF’s shares may be halted if the listing exchange’s officials deem such action appropriate; (4) a passively-managed ETF may not accurately track the performance of the reference asset; and (5) a passively-managed ETF would not necessarily sell a security because the issuer of the security was in financial trouble unless the security is removed from the index that the ETF seeks to track. Investment in ETFs may involve duplication of management fees and certain other expenses, as the Fund indirectly bears its proportionate share of any expenses paid by the ETFs in which it invests.
Euro-and Eurozone-Related Risk. To the extent a Fund invests in investments located in Europe, it may be subject to risks not typically associated with investments in the United States. A majority of western European countries and a number of eastern European countries are members of the European Union, an intergovernmental union aimed at developing economic and political coordination and cooperation among its member states. European countries that are members of the Economic and Monetary Union of the European Union (“EMU”) are subject to restrictions on inflation rates, interest rates, deficits, and debt levels. The EMU sets out different stages and commitments for member states to follow in an effort to achieve greater coordination of economic, fiscal, and monetary policies. As a condition to adopting the euro, EMU member states must also relinquish control of their monetary policies to the European Central Bank and become subject to certain monetary and fiscal controls imposed by the EMU. These controls remove EMU member states’ flexibility in implementing monetary policy measures to address regional economic conditions, which may impair their ability to respond to crises. A number of countries in the European Union have experienced, and may continue to experience, severe economic and financial difficulties. Additional European Union member countries may also fall subject to such difficulties. These events could negatively affect the value and liquidity of a Fund’s investments in euro-denominated securities and derivatives contracts, as well as securities of issuers located in the European Union or with significant exposure to European Union issuers or countries, to the extent a Fund invests in such securities. If the euro is dissolved entirely, the legal and contractual consequences for holders of euro-denominated obligations and derivative contracts would be determined by laws in effect at such time. Such investments may continue to be held, or purchased, to the extent consistent with a Fund’s investment objective and permitted under applicable law. These potential developments, or market perceptions concerning these and related issues, could adversely affect the value of a Fund’s shares.
Continuing uncertainty as to the status of the European Economic and Monetary Union (“EMU”) and the potential for certain countries to withdraw from the institution has created significant volatility in currency and financial markets generally. Any partial or complete dissolution of the EU could have significant adverse effects on currency and financial markets, and on the values of a Fund’s portfolio investments. On January 31, 2020, the UK left the EU (commonly known as “Brexit”). The full extent of the political, economic and legal consequences of Brexit are not yet fully known, and the long-term impact of Brexit on the UK, the EU and the broader global
 
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economy may be significant. As a result of the political divisions within the UK and between the UK and the EU that the referendum vote has highlighted and the uncertain consequences of Brexit, the UK and European economies and the broader economy could be significantly impacted, potentially resulting in increased market volatility and illiquidity, political, economic, and legal uncertainty, and lower economic growth for companies that rely significantly on Europe for their business activities and revenues. Any further exits from the EU, or the possibility of such exits, or the abandonment of the Euro, may cause additional market disruption globally and introduce new legal and regulatory uncertainties.
If one or more EMU countries were to stop using the euro as its primary currency, a Fund’s investments in such countries may be redenominated into a different or newly adopted currency. As a result, the value of those investments could decline significantly and unpredictably. In addition, securities or other investments that are redenominated may be subject to liquidity risk and the risk that a Fund may not be able to value investments accurately to a greater extent than similar investments currently denominated in euros. To the extent a currency used for redenomination purposes is not specified in respect of certain EMU related investments, or should the euro cease to be used entirely, the currency in which such investments are denominated may be unclear, making such investments particularly difficult to value or dispose of. A Fund may incur additional expenses to the extent it is required to seek judicial or other clarification of the denomination or value of such securities.
Fixed Income Risk. Some Funds may invest in fixed income securities. These securities will increase or decrease in value based on changes in interest rates. If rates increase, the value of a Fund’s fixed income securities generally declines. On the other hand, if rates fall, the value of the fixed income securities generally increases. Your investment will decline in value if the value of a Fund’s investments decreases. Fixed income securities with greater interest rate sensitivity and longer maturities tend to produce higher yields, but are subject to greater fluctuations in value. Usually, changes in the value of fixed income securities will not affect cash income generated, but may affect the value of your investment.
Focused Investment Risk. Focusing investments in a particular market, sector or value chain (which may include issuers in a number of different industries) increases the risk of loss because the stocks of many or all of the companies in such market, sector or value chain may decline in value due to economic, market, technological, political or regulatory developments adversely affecting the market or value chain. Because the Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund focuses on water-and waste-related investments, the Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund will be subject to a greater extent to risks associated with these value chains. Please see “Water-Related Risks” and “Waste-Related Risks” below for more information on these specific risks.
Geographic Focus Risk. From time to time a Fund’s investment may be focused in a particular geographic region. The value of the investments of a Fund that focuses its investments in a particular geographic location will be highly sensitive to financial, economic, political, and other developments affecting the fiscal stability of that location, and conditions that negatively impact that location will have a greater impact on the Fund as compared with a fund that does not have its holdings similarly focused. Events negatively affecting such location are therefore likely to cause the value of a Fund’s shares to decrease, perhaps significantly.
Growth Investing Risk. The prices of growth stocks may be based largely on expectations of future earnings, and can decline rapidly and significantly in reaction to negative news about various factors, such as earnings, revenues, the economy, political developments, or other news. Growth stocks may underperform stocks in other broad style categories (and the stock market as a whole) over a short or long period of time. Growth stocks may shift in and out of favor with investors generally, sometimes rapidly, depending on changes in market, economic, and other factors. As a result, at times when it holds investments in growth stocks, a Fund may underperform other investment funds that favor different investment styles. Because growth companies typically reinvest their earnings, growth stocks typically do not pay dividends at levels associated with other types of stocks, if at all.
GARP Investment Strategy Risk. GARP investing involves buying stocks that have a reasonable price/earnings ratio in relationship to the relevant company’s earnings growth rate. To the extent a Fund uses a GARP investing
 
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strategy, the Fund’s performance may be adversely affected when stocks preferred by a GARP investing strategy underperform or are not favored by investors in prevailing market and economic conditions. To the extent a Fund’s GARP investment strategy incorporates value investing, the Fund will be subject to the risks associated with value securities. See “Value Investing Risk” below.
Hedging Risk. Some Funds may invest in hedging assets. Hedging is a strategy in which a Fund uses a derivative or other security to offset certain risks associated with other Fund holdings or to render the portfolio more resilient to market fluctuations. There can be no assurance that a Fund’s hedging strategy will reduce risk or that hedging transactions will be either available or cost effective. A Fund is not required to use hedging and may choose not to do so.
High Yield (“Junk Bond”) Investments Risk. Some Funds may invest in high yield securities, also known as “junk bonds,” which have a higher risk of issuer default or may be in default. The securities are not investment grade and are generally considered speculative because they present a greater risk of loss than higher quality debt securities. In particular, lower-rated high yield securities (CCC or below) are subject to a greater degree of credit risk than higher-rated high yield bonds. These lower-rated or defaulted debt securities may fluctuate more in price, and are less liquid than higher-rated securities because issuers of such lower-rated debt securities are not as strong financially, and are more likely to encounter financial difficulties and be more vulnerable to adverse changes in the economy. In the event of an issuer’s bankruptcy, claims of other creditors may have priority over the claims of high yield bond holders, leaving few or no assets available to repay high yield bond holders. A characteristic of the high yield bond is the issuance of securities under Rule 144A, many with registration rights. Some Funds may invest in high yield securities issue under Rule 144A, with or without registration rights.
India Risk. Government actions, bureaucratic obstacles and inconsistent economic reform within the Indian government have had a significant effect on the economy and could adversely affect market conditions, economic growth and the profitability of private enterprises. Global economic developments may inhibit the flow of non-U.S. capital on which India is dependent to sustain its growth. Large portions of many Indian companies remain in the hands of individuals and corporate governance standards of Indian companies may be weaker and less transparent, which may increase the risk of loss and unequal treatment of investors. To the extent a Fund invests in investments in India, it may be subject to risks presented by investments in an emerging market country, including liquidity risk, which may result in extreme volatility in the prices of Indian securities. Religious, cultural and military disputes persist in India, and between India and Pakistan (as well as between sectarian groups within each country). In addition, the Indian economy could be adversely impacted by natural disasters and acts of terrorism. Both India and Pakistan have tested nuclear arms, and the threat of deployment of such weapons could hinder development of the Indian economy, and escalating tensions could impact the broader region.
Interest Rate Risk. When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by a Fund will generally decline in value. When interest rates fall, the value of fixed income securities generally increase. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short term fixed income securities or instruments. The risks associated with changing interest rates may have unpredictable effects on the markets and a Fund’s investments. Fluctuations in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of fixed income securities and instruments held by a Fund. Your investment will decline in value if the value of the Fund’s investments decreases. Recently, there have been inflationary price movements, which have caused the fixed income securities markets to experience heightened levels of interest rate volatility and liquidity risk. The risks associated with rising interest rates may be particularly acute in the current market environment because the Federal Reserve Board recently raised rates and may continue to do so.
Investment Company Risk. If a Fund invests in shares of another investment company, shareholders will indirectly bear fees and expenses charged by the underlying investment companies in which a Fund invests in addition to the Fund’s direct fees and expenses. A Fund also will incur brokerage costs when it purchases ETFs and closed-end funds. Furthermore, investments in other funds could affect the timing, amount, and character of distributions to shareholders and therefore may increase the amount of taxes payable by investors in a Fund.
 
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IPO Risk. A Fund may purchase securities in initial public offerings (“IPO”s). These securities are subject to many of the same risks of investing in companies with smaller market capitalizations. Securities issued in IPOs have no trading history, and information about the companies may be available for very limited periods. In addition, the prices of securities sold in IPOs may be highly volatile. At any particular time or from time to time a Fund may not be able to invest in securities issued in IPOs, or invest to the extent desired because, for example, only a small portion (if any) of the securities being offered in an IPO may be made available to the Fund. In addition, under certain market conditions a relatively small number of companies may issue securities in IPOs. Similarly, as the number of funds to which IPO securities are allocated increases, the number of securities issued to any one fund, if any, may decrease. The investment performance of a Fund during periods when it is unable to invest significantly or at all in IPOs may be lower than during periods when the Fund is able to do so. In addition, as a Fund increases in size, the impact of IPOs on the Fund’s performance will generally decrease.
Japan Risk. The Japanese economy may be subject to economic, political and social instability, which could have a negative impact on Japanese securities, and may impact a Fund’s performance to the extent it invests in such securities. In the past, Japan’s economic growth rate has remained relatively low, and it may remain low in the future. At times, the Japanese economy has been adversely impacted by government intervention and protectionism, changes in its labor market, and an unstable financial services sector. International trade, government support of the financial services sector and other troubled sectors, government policy, natural disasters and/or geopolitical developments could significantly affect the Japanese economy. A significant portion of Japan’s trade is conducted with developing nations and can be affected by conditions in these nations or by currency fluctuations. Japan is an island state with few natural resources and limited land area and is reliant on imports for its commodity needs. Any fluctuations or shortages in the commodity markets could have a negative impact on the Japanese economy.
Key Person Risk. Key person risk is the risk that results when a Fund’s investment program is highly dependent on the investment skill and dedication of a small number of “key” persons at the Adviser, which can result in decreased investment results if these “key” persons become unable to apply their full attention to the management of a Fund’s investments for health or other reasons.
LIBOR Risk. LIBOR was a benchmark interest rate at which major global banks lent to one another in the international interbank market for short-term loans, and was used extensively in the United States and globally as a “reference rate” for certain financial instruments including corporate and municipal bonds, bank loans, asset-backed and mortgage-related securities, interest rate swaps and other derivatives. In 2017, the United Kingdom Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”), the agency that oversees LIBOR, announced its intention to cease compelling banks to provide the quotations needed to sustain LIBOR after 2021. In connection with the global transition away from LIBOR, led by regulators and market participants, LIBOR was last published on a representative basis at the end of June 2023. Actions by regulators have resulted in the establishment of alternative reference rates to LIBOR in most major currencies. In March 2022, the U.S. federal government enacted legislation to establish a process for replacing LIBOR in certain existing contracts that do not already provide for the use of a clearly defined or practicable replacement benchmark rate as described in the legislation. Generally speaking, as of June 30, 2023, for contracts that do not contain a fallback provision as described in the legislation, a benchmark replacement recommended by the Federal Reserve Board will effectively automatically replace the USD LIBOR benchmark in the contract with the Secured Overnight Financing Rate (SOFR). In connection with these changes, interest rate or other provisions included in relevant contracts or other arrangements entered into by a Fund may need to be renegotiated. Markets are developing in these new rates, but concerns around liquidity of the new rates and how to appropriately mitigate any economic value transfer as a result of the transition remain. Neither the effect of the transition process nor its ultimate success can yet be fully known. The transition away from LIBOR and the use of replacement rates may adversely affect transactions that used LIBOR as a reference rate, financial institutions, funds and other market participants that engaged in such transactions, and the financial markets generally. It is difficult to predict the full impact of the transition away from LIBOR and the adoption of alternative reference rates on the Funds.
 
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Limited History of Operations. Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions and the Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund are newly organized, diversified, open-end management investment companies with limited operating histories. As a result, prospective investors have a limited track record or history on which to base their investment decision. The Adviser or its affiliates may contribute “seed capital” in connection with the launch of a Fund to commence operations prior to investment by third parties. Seed capital may represent ownership of up to 100% of a Fund during its initial phase of operation and, in limited circumstances, during subsequent periods. It is anticipated that over time this percentage will decrease. Funds with higher percentages of seed capital may exhibit different portfolio dynamics or performance profiles than those with a lower percentage of seed capital.
Liquidity Risk. The Funds may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value. Liquidity risk may be amplified in situations where foreign countries close their securities markets for extended periods of time due to scheduled holidays, such as the week-long closure of Chinese securities markets that occurs annually in October. The SEC has recently proposed rule amendments that, if adopted as proposed, could result in a larger percentage of a Fund’s investments being classified as illiquid investments.
Loan-Related Investments Risk. In addition to risks generally associated with debt investments (e.g., interest rate risk and default risk), loan-related investments such as loan participations and assignments are subject to other risks. Although a loan obligation may be fully collateralized at the time of acquisition, the collateral may decline in value, be or become illiquid or less liquid, or lose all or substantially all of its value subsequent to investment. Bank loans are generally less liquid than many other debt securities. Transactions in bank loans may settle on a delayed basis (and in certain cases may take longer than seven days to settle), such that a Fund may not receive the proceeds from the sale of a loan for a substantial period of time after the sale. As a result, the proceeds related to the sale of bank loans may not be available to make additional investments or to meet a Fund’s redemption obligations until a substantial period after the sale of the loans.
Long-Term Investment Strategy Risk. Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions and Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund each pursue long-term investment approaches, typically seeking returns over a period of several years. This investment style may cause those Funds to lose money or underperform compared to their benchmark indices or other mutual funds over extended periods of time, and the Funds may not perform as expected in the long term. An investment in the Funds may be more suitable for long-term investors who can bear the risk of short- or medium-term fluctuations in the value of the Funds’ portfolios. The market price of a Fund’s investments may fluctuate daily due to economic and other events that affect particular companies and other issuers or the market as a whole. Short- and medium-term price fluctuations may be especially pronounced in less developed markets or in companies with lower market capitalizations in which the Funds may invest.
Investments in certain industries or markets may be subject to wider variations in performance as a result of special risks common to such markets or industries. For example, water-related companies may be impacted by extreme weather events such as floods or droughts, or by worldwide technological developments or statutory or regulatory changes, quickly rendering their business models and services outdated.
Active Management Risk. The Adviser’s dependence, for certain of the Funds, on a quantitative strategy, and the Adviser’s judgments about the attractiveness, value, and potential appreciation of a particular asset class or individual security in which a Fund invests may prove to be incorrect, and there is no guarantee that individual securities will perform as anticipated. Any given investment strategy may fail to produce the intended results, and a Fund’s portfolio may underperform other comparable funds because of portfolio management decisions related to, among other things, the selection of investments, portfolio construction, evaluation of an issuer’s corporate governance practices, risk assessments, and/or the outlook on market trends and opportunities.
Market Risk. The market value of a Fund’s investments will move up and down, sometimes rapidly and unpredictably, based upon political, regulatory, market, economic, and social conditions, as well as developments that impact specific economic sectors, industries, or segments of the market, including conditions that directly relate to the issuers of a Fund’s investments, such as management performance, financial condition, and demand
 
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for the issuers’ goods and services. A Fund is subject to the risk that geopolitical events will adversely affect global economies and markets. War, terrorism, and related geopolitical events have led, and in the future may lead, to increased short-term market volatility and may have adverse long-term effects on global economies and markets. Likewise, natural and environmental disasters and epidemics or pandemics may be highly disruptive to economies and markets.
Municipal Securities Risk. Municipal securities are obligations, often bonds and notes, issued by or on behalf of states, territories and possessions of the United States and the District of Columbia and their political subdivisions, agencies, authorities and instrumentalities, the interest on which is typically exempt from federal income tax.
Municipal bonds are generally considered riskier investments than Treasury securities. The prices and yields on municipal securities are subject to change from time to time and depend upon a variety of factors, including general money market conditions, the financial condition of the issuer (or other entities whose financial resources are supporting the municipal security), general conditions in the market for tax-exempt obligations, the size of a particular offering and the maturity of the obligation and the rating(s) of the issue. The value of municipal bonds that depend on a specific revenue source or general revenue source to fund their payment obligations may fluctuate as a result of changes in the cash flows generated by the revenue source(s) or changes in the priority of the municipal obligation to receive the cash flows generated by the revenue source(s). In addition, changes in federal tax laws or the activity of an issuer may adversely affect the tax-exempt status of municipal bonds.
Changes in a municipality’s financial health may make it difficult for the municipality to make interest and principal payments when due. A number of municipalities have had significant financial problems recently, and these and other municipalities could, potentially, continue to experience significant financial problems resulting from lower tax revenues and/or decreased aid from state and local governments in the event of an economic downturn. This could decrease a Fund’s income or hurt the ability to preserve capital and liquidity. Under some circumstances, municipal securities might not pay interest unless the state legislature or municipality authorizes money for that purpose. Some securities, including municipal lease obligations, carry additional risks. For example, they may be difficult to trade or interest payments may be tied only to a specific stream of revenue. Since some municipal securities may be secured or guaranteed by banks and other institutions, the risk to a Fund could increase if the banking or financial sector suffers an economic downturn and/or if the credit ratings of the institutions issuing the guarantee are downgraded or at risk of being downgraded by a national rating organization. If such events were to occur, the value of the security could decrease or the value could be lost entirely, and it may be difficult or impossible for the Fund to sell the security at the time and the price that normally prevails in the market. Interest on municipal obligations, while generally exempt from federal income tax, may not be exempt from federal alternative minimum tax.
Natural Disaster/Epidemic Risk. Natural or environmental disasters, such as earthquakes, fires, floods, hurricanes, tsunamis and other severe weather-related phenomena generally, and widespread disease, including pandemics and epidemics, have been and may be highly disruptive to economies and markets, adversely impacting individual companies, sectors, industries, markets, currencies, interest and inflation rates, credit ratings, investor sentiment, and other factors affecting the value of a Fund’s investments. Given the increasing interdependence among global economies and markets, conditions in one country, market, or region are increasingly likely to adversely affect markets, issuers, and/or non-U.S. exchange rates in other countries, for example, an epidemic or pandemic can result in travel restrictions, closed international borders, enhanced health screenings at ports of entry and elsewhere, disruption of and delays in healthcare service preparation and delivery, prolonged quarantines, cancellations, supply chain disruptions, and lower consumer demand, as well as general concern and uncertainty. All of these disruptive effects were present, for example, in the global pandemic linked to the outbreak of respiratory disease caused by a novel coronavirus designated as COVID-19 that was first reported in China in December 2019. The effects of any disease outbreak may be greater in countries with less developed disease prevention and control programs and may also exacerbate other pre-existing political, social, economic, market and financial risks. A pandemic and its effects may be short term or may last for an
 
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extended period of time, and in either case can result in significant market volatility, exchange trading suspensions and closures, declines in global financial markets, higher default rates, and a substantial economic downturn or recession. Infectious illness outbreaks can adversely affect the economies of many nations or the entire global economy, individual issuers and capital markets in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen. Any such events could have a significant adverse impact on the value of a Fund’s investments.
Non-U.S. Securities Risk. Non-U.S. securities risk is the risk associated with investments in issuers located in non-U.S. countries. Investing in non-U.S. securities poses additional market risks since political and economic events unique in a country or region will affect those markets and their issuers and may not affect the U.S. economy or U.S. issuers. Securities markets outside the U.S., while growing in volume, have for the most part substantially less volume than U.S. markets, and many securities traded on these non-U.S. markets are less liquid and their prices are more volatile than securities of comparable U.S. companies. In addition, settlement of trades in some non-U.S. markets is much slower and more subject to failure than in U.S. markets. Other risks associated with investing in non-U.S. securities include, among other things, imposition of exchange control regulation by the U.S. or non-U.S. governments, U.S. and non-U.S. withholding or other taxes, limitations on the removal of funds or other assets, policies of governments with respect to possible nationalization of their industries, and economic or political instability in non-U.S. nations. There may be less publicly available information about certain non-U.S. companies than would be the case for comparable companies in the U.S. and certain non-U.S. companies may not be subject to accounting, auditing, and financial reporting standards and requirements comparable to or as uniform as those of U.S. companies. The Public Company Accounting Oversight Board, which regulates auditors of U.S. public companies, is unable to inspect audit work papers in certain non-U.S. countries. Investors in non-U.S. countries often have limited rights and few practical remedies to pursue shareholder claims, including class actions or fraud claims, and the ability of the SEC, the U.S. Department of Justice and other authorities to bring and enforce actions against non-U.S. issuers or non-U.S. persons is limited. Many countries, including developed nations and emerging markets, are faced with concerns about high government debt levels, credit rating downgrades, the future of the euro as a common currency, possible government debt restructuring and related issues, all of which may cause the value of a Fund’s non-U.S. investments to decline. Nationalization, expropriation or confiscatory taxation, currency blockage, the imposition of sanctions by other countries (such as the United States), political changes or diplomatic developments may also cause the value of a Fund’s non-U.S. investments to decline. When imposed, non-U.S. withholding or other taxes reduce a Fund’s return on non-U.S. securities. In the event of nationalization, expropriation or other confiscation, a Fund could lose its entire non-U.S. investment. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to these risks to a greater extent than those in more developed markets and securities of developed market companies that conduct substantial business in emerging markets may also be subject to greater risk. These risks also apply to securities of non-U.S. issuers traded in the United States or through depositary receipt programs such as American Depositary Receipts. In certain cases, depositary receipts may also be issued through programs in local markets, such as Thai NVDRs. See Summary of Principal Risks – Depositary Receipts in this Prospectus for additional information. To the extent a Fund invests a significant portion of its assets in a specific geographic region, the Fund may have more exposure to regional political, economic, environmental, credit/counterparty and information risks. In addition, non-U.S. securities may be subject to increased credit/counterparty risk because of the potential difficulties of requiring non-U.S. entities to honor their contractual commitments.
Participatory Notes Risk. Participatory notes are equity access products structured as debt obligations issued by banks or broker-dealers that are designed to replicate the performance of certain issuers and markets where direct investment is either impossible or difficult due to local restrictions. The performance results of participatory notes will not replicate exactly the performance of the issuers or markets that the notes seek to replicate due to transaction costs and other expenses. Investments in participatory notes involve the same risks associated with a direct investment in the shares of the companies the notes seek to replicate. In addition, participatory notes are subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the broker-dealer or bank that issues the notes will not fulfill its contractual obligation to complete the transaction with a Fund. Some participatory notes may be considered illiquid and, therefore, will be subject to a Fund’s percentage limitation for investments in illiquid securities. The Funds may take long or short positions in participatory notes.
 
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Preferred Stock Risk. A Fund may invest in preferred stock. The value of preferred stocks will fluctuate with changes in interest rates. Typically, a rise in interest rates causes a decline in the value of preferred stock. Preferred stocks are also subject to credit risk, which is the possibility that an issuer of preferred stock will fail to make its dividend payments.
Portfolio Turnover Risk. A Fund may sell its portfolio securities, regardless of the length of time that they have been held, if the Adviser determines that it would be in the Fund’s best interest to do so. It may be appropriate to buy or sell portfolio securities due to economic, market, or other factors that are not within the Adviser’s control. These transactions will increase a Fund’s “portfolio turnover.” A 100% portfolio turnover rate would occur if all of the securities in a Fund were replaced during the annual measurement period. High turnover rates generally result in higher brokerage costs to a Fund, may result in higher amounts of taxable distributions to shareholders each year and higher effective tax rates on those distribution amounts, and may reduce the Fund’s returns.
Regulatory Risk. Changes in the laws or regulations of the United States or other countries, including changes to applicable tax laws and regulations, could impair the ability of a Fund to achieve its investment objective and could increase the operating expenses of the Fund.
REIT Risk. REITs are subject to certain other risks related to their structure and focus. REITs generally are dependent upon management skills and may not be diversified. REITs are also subject to heavy cash flow dependency, defaults by borrowers and self-liquidation. In addition, REITs could possibly fail to (i) qualify for favorable tax treatment under applicable tax law, or (ii) maintain their exemptions from registration under the Investment Company Act of 1940, as amended (the “1940 Act”). The above factors may also adversely affect a borrower’s or a lessee’s ability to meet its obligations to the REIT. In the event of a default by a borrower or lessee, the REIT may experience delays in enforcing its rights as a mortgagee or lessor and may incur substantial costs associated with protecting its investments.
Small-Cap and Mid-Cap Company Risk. Small- and mid-capitalization companies may be more vulnerable to adverse business or economic events than larger, more established companies. In particular, these small- and mid-capitalization companies may have limited product lines, markets, and financial resources, and may depend upon a relatively small management group. These companies may experience higher growth rates and higher interest rates than larger capitalization companies. Therefore, small- and mid-cap stocks may be more volatile than those of larger companies. Small cap securities may be traded over the counter or listed on an exchange and it may be harder to sell the smallest capitalization company stocks, which can reduce their selling prices. Smaller capitalization companies may be particularly affected by interest rate increases, as they may find it more difficult to borrow money to continue or expand operations, or may have difficulty in repaying any loans that have a floating interest rate.
South Korea Risk. To the extent a Fund invests in investments located in South Korea, the Fund will be susceptible to adverse market, political, regulatory and geographic events affecting South Korea. The South Korean economy is dependent on the economies of other Asian countries, especially China and Southeast Asia, and the United States as key trading partners. Furthermore, South Korea’s economy may be significantly affected by currency fluctuations and increasing competition from Asia’s other low-cost emerging economies. Also, tensions with North Korea could escalate and lead to further uncertainty in the political and economic climate of South Korea.
Sustainable Investing Risk. Applying sustainability criteria to the investment process may exclude or reduce exposure to securities of certain issuers for sustainability reasons and, therefore, Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund (for purposes of this risk, the “Fund”) may forgo some market opportunities available to funds that do not use sustainability criteria. The Fund’s performance may at times be better or worse than the performance of funds that do not use sustainability criteria. Although the Adviser seeks to identify issuers that fit within its sustainability criteria, investors may differ in their views of what fits within this category of investments. As a result, the Fund may invest in issuers that do not reflect the beliefs and values of any particular investor. The
 
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Adviser’s exclusion of certain investments from the Fund’s investment universe may adversely affect the Fund’s relative performance at times when such investments are performing well. Because the Adviser evaluates ESG metrics when selecting certain securities, the Fund’s portfolio may perform differently than funds that do not use ESG metrics. ESG metrics may prioritize long term rather than short term returns. There is a risk that the information that the Adviser uses in evaluating an issuer may be incomplete, inaccurate or unavailable, which could adversely affect the analysis relevant to a particular investment. In addition, the Adviser’s assessment of whether an issuer fits within its sustainability criteria is made at the time of purchase and as a result, there is a risk that the issuers identified by the Adviser will not operate as anticipated and will no longer fit within the Adviser’s sustainability criteria. Further, the regulatory landscape with respect to sustainable investing in the United States is still developing and future rules and regulations may require the Fund to modify or alter its investment process with respect to sustainable investing.
Taiwan Risk. The economy of Taiwan is heavily dependent on exports. Currency fluctuations, increasing competition from Asia’s other emerge economies, and conditions that weaken demand for Taiwan’s export products worldwide could have a negative impact on the Taiwanese economy as a whole, and may impact a Fund’s performance to the extent the Fund invests in such securities. Additionally, a disruption in Taiwan’s exports could also result in broader negative economic impacts with respect to those industries and countries that rely upon them. Concerns over Taiwan’s history of political contention and its current relationship with China may also have a significant impact on the economy of Taiwan.
United Kingdom Investments Risk. The United Kingdom has one of the largest economies in Europe and is heavily dependent on trade with the European Union, and to a lesser extent the United States and China. As a result, the British economy may be impacted by changes to the economic condition of the United States, China and other European countries. The British economy relies heavily on the export of financial services to the United States and other European countries and, therefore, a prolonged slowdown in the financial services sector may have a negative impact on the British economy, as well as on a Fund, to the extent the Fund invests in investments located in the United Kingdom. Furthermore, the United Kingdom voted via referendum to leave the European Union (“Brexit”). After years of negotiations, a trade agreement between the United Kingdom and the European Union became effective on January 1, 2021, but critical aspects of the relationship remain unresolved and subject to further negotiation and agreement. The full extent of the political, economic and legal consequences of Brexit are not yet fully known, and the long-term impact of Brexit on the UK, the EU and the broader global economy may be significant.
Value Investing Risk. Value securities are securities of companies that may have experienced adverse business, industry, or other developments or may be subject to special risks that have caused the securities to be out of favor and, in turn, potentially undervalued. It may take longer than expected for the value of such securities to rise to the anticipated value, or the value may never do so. In addition, value securities, at times, may not perform as well as growth securities or the stock market in general, and may be out of favor with investors for varying periods of time.
Waste-related Risks. Companies operating in the waste water value chain can be affected by, among other things, availability and cost of labor to collect and transport waste, transportation costs, consumer and industry trends and subsequent waste volumes, regulatory changes on collection, and treatment of waste. These companies can also be affected by overall economic trends, government spending on related projects, and the cost of commodities.
Water-related Risks. Companies operating in the water value chain can be affected by, among other things, irrigation and industrial usage trends, viability of infrastructure projects, regulatory changes on water usage, pricing, contamination and reusability, and environmental factors such as floods and droughts. These companies can also be affected by overall economic trends, interest rates, government spending on related projects, and the cost of commodities.
 
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Portfolio Holdings Disclosure
A description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the portfolio holdings is available in the SAI.
PRIOR RELATED PERFORMANCE OF SIMILAR ACCOUNTS
The Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund (the “Fund” for purposes of this section) has performance history that is shorter than the performance history of other accounts and/or funds managed similarly by the Fund’s portfolio management team. The following tables set forth historical performance information for an open-ended investment company (OEIC) and UCITS that have a substantially similar investment objective, policy and strategy as the Fund and are managed by the same portfolio managers. The portfolio managers have managed similar strategies as employees of other investment managers prior to September 13, 2021, however, the underlying funds in the Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund Composite (the “Composite”) are limited to include only accounts managed during the portfolio managers’ time at the Adviser, which they joined in 2021. The referenced accounts comprise all substantially similar strategies managed by the Adviser and its affiliates.
The data for the Composite is provided to illustrate the past performance of the Fund’s portfolio managers in managing substantially similar accounts as measured against a specified market index and does not represent the performance of the Fund. The accounts in the Composite are separate and distinct from the Fund; the performance of the Composite is not intended as a substitute for the Fund’s performance and should not be considered a prediction of the future performance of the Fund or of the portfolio management team.
The Composite’s performance data shown below was calculated in accordance with recognized industry standards, consistently applied to all time periods. All returns presented were calculated on a total return basis, and assume the reinvestment of dividends, capital gains and other earnings. All returns are net of trading costs, without provision for U.S. federal or state income taxes. The Composite’s performance information is calculated on the basis of the returns of underlying accounts denominated in currencies other than U.S. dollars (specifically, British Pounds (GBP)) and the returns of those accounts have been converted to U.S. dollars as of each reference date, prior to factoring those accounts into the Composite’s performance. Converting an underlying account denominated in a foreign currency to U.S. dollars will impact total annual returns for the Composite. “Net of Fees” figures also reflect the deduction of all fees applicable to the accounts in the Composite including a bundled fee (which includes all effective charges for management fees, custody and other administrative fees) and performance fees. “Gross of Fees” figures show performance without taking into account the deductions of any fees.
Securities transactions are accounted for on trade date and accrual accounting is utilized. Cash and equivalents are included in performance returns. Monthly returns of the Composite combine the individual accounts’ returns (calculated on a time-weighted rate of return basis that is revalued daily) by asset-weighting each account’s asset value as of the beginning of the month. Annual returns are calculated by linking the monthly returns. Investors should be aware that the performance information shown below was calculated differently than the methodology mandated by the SEC for registered investment companies.
The underlying accounts included in the Composite may be subject to lower expenses than the Fund and are not subject to the diversification requirements, specific tax restrictions and investment limitations imposed on the Fund by the Investment Company Act of 1940 or Subchapter M of the Internal Revenue Code. Consequently, the performance results for the underlying accounts would have been less favorable had the underlying accounts been subject to the same expenses as the Fund and may have been less favorable had they been regulated as investment companies under the federal securities laws.
The returns set forth below may not be representative of the results that may be achieved by the Fund in the future, in part because the past results are not necessarily indicative of future results. In addition, the results presented below may not necessarily equate with the return experienced by any particular investor as a result of
 
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the timing of investments and redemptions, market conditions and other factors. The effect of taxes on any investor will depend on such person’s tax status, and the results have not been reduced to reflect any income tax that may have been payable.
The table below shows the annual total returns for the corresponding Composite, and a broad-based securities market index for the period ended September 30, 2023.
Prior Performance of a Similar Account Relating to the Fund
 
     Since
Inception1
 
Comparable Account (Net of Fees)
     ‑6.83
Comparable Account (Gross of Fees)
     ‑4.34
MSCI All Country World NR Index (Benchmark)
     ‑4.15
 
1 
The Composite’s inception date is October 1, 2021.
MANAGEMENT OF THE FUNDS
Investment Adviser
JOHCM (USA) Inc (“JOHCM USA” or the “Adviser”) serves as the investment adviser to the Funds. Its principal place of business is 53 State Street, 13th Floor Boston, MA, 02109. JOHCM USA is an indirect wholly owned subsidiary of Perpetual Limited. Perpetual Limited is a diversified financial services company that has been serving Australians since 1886. The Adviser is an investment adviser registered with the SEC in the U.S. under the Investment Advisers Act of 1940, as amended. As adviser to the Funds, subject to the Board of Trustees’ supervision, JOHCM USA continuously reviews, supervises, and administers each Fund’s investment program. JOHCM USA also ensures compliance with each Fund’s investment policies and guidelines. For its services, the Adviser is entitled to a management fee, as set forth below, which is calculated daily and paid monthly based on the average daily net assets of each Fund. As of September 30, 2023, JOHCM USA had approximately $9 billion in assets under management.
Under the Funds’ Investment Advisory Agreement, the Adviser is paid an annual management fee from each Fund as follows:
 
Fund   
Management Fee
(as percentage of average
daily net assets)
 
JOHCM Emerging Markets Discovery Fund
     1.30%  
JOHCM Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund
     0.90%  
JOHCM Global Select Fund
     0.89%  
JOHCM International Opportunities Fund
     0.75%  
JOHCM International Select Fund
     0.89%/0.84 %* 
Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions
     0.75%  
Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund
     0.75%  
 
*
0.89% of average daily net assets up to $7 billion; 0.84% of average daily net assets in excess of $7 billion.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the Investment Advisory Agreement between the Adviser and the Trust on behalf of the Funds, is included in the Fund shareholder report for the period during which the Board of Trustees approved the contract, except that, in the case of a new Fund, a discussion of the basis of the Board of Trustees’ approval of the Fund’s initial Investment Advisory Agreement is included in the Fund’s initial shareholder report. The Board’s cycle for the Funds’ contract renewals typically occurs in December each year.
 
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Participating Affiliate Arrangements
JOHCM USA has entered into a personnel-sharing arrangement with its United Kingdom-based affiliate, J O Hambro Capital Management Limited, and with its Singapore-based affiliate, JOHCM (Singapore) Pte. Limited (“JOH Singapore”). Pursuant to this arrangement, certain employees of J O Hambro Capital Management Limited and JOH Singapore, as “participating affiliates,” serve as “associated persons” of JOHCM USA and, in this capacity, are subject to the oversight of JOHCM USA and its Chief Compliance Officer. These associated persons will, on behalf of JOHCM USA, provide discretionary investment management services (including acting as portfolio managers), research and related services to the Funds in accordance with the investment objectives, policies and limitations set forth in the Prospectus and SAI. The personnel-sharing arrangement is based on no-action letters of the staff of the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (the “SEC”) that permit SEC-registered investment advisers to rely on and use the resources of advisory affiliates, subject to certain conditions. While J O Hambro Capital Management Limited is currently registered as an investment adviser with the SEC, while acting as a participating affiliate of JOHCM USA, its associated persons will be subject to the policies and procedures of JOHCM USA. J O Hambro Capital Management Limited may in the future deregister as an investment adviser in the US, but such deregistration would not affect the participating affiliate arrangement through which it provides services to the Funds. JOH Singapore is not registered as an investment adviser with the SEC.
In addition, trading personnel will be shared across the affiliates referenced above, and execution of trades may be done by personnel employed by these affiliated entities, in each case subject to the participating affiliate arrangements described above. JOHCM USA expects to execute a substantial portion of each JOHCM and Regnan Fund’s trading orders through personnel and systems housed at J O Hambro Capital Management Limited and at JOH Singapore.
Fund Recoupment Arrangements
The Adviser has contractually agreed to waive fees and reimburse expenses of each Fund to the extent that total annual operating expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) to amounts specified in each Fund Summary, as applicable. Generally, if it becomes unnecessary for the Adviser to waive fees or make reimbursements, the Adviser may recoup any of its prior waivers or reimbursements for a period not to exceed three years from the date on which the waiver or reimbursement was made to the extent that such a recoupment does not cause the total annual fund operating expenses (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) to exceed the applicable expense limitation that was in effect at the time of the waiver or reimbursement. The agreement to waive fees and reimburse expenses may be terminated by the Board of Trustees at any time and will terminate automatically upon termination of the Funds’ Investment Advisory Agreement.
Predecessor Fund Recoupment Arrangements
Under the Second Amended and Restated Expense Limitation Agreement dated February 1, 2024 between the Adviser and the Trust (the “Primary Expense Limitation Agreement”), which references previous investment advisory agreements between certain series of Advisers Investment Trust, to which the Funds, with the exception of Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions and Regnan Sustainable Water and Waste Fund (together, the “Regnan Funds”) now serve as accounting successors (each, a “Predecessor Fund,” and collectively, the “Predecessor Funds”), and J O Hambro Capital Management Limited, an affiliate of the Adviser that served as the investment adviser to each Predecessor Fund, J O Hambro Capital Management Limited agreed to waive investment management fees and reimburse certain Predecessor Funds for other expenses of the Predecessor Fund (including, but not limited to, organizational and offering costs), to the extent necessary to limit the total operating expenses of the Predecessor Funds (exclusive of brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation
 
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and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with the investments in underlying investment companies and extraordinary expenses (as determined under generally accepted principles)). To the extent that J O Hambro Capital Management Limited waived the investment advisory fees and/or reimbursed the Predecessor Funds for such other ordinary expenses, the Adviser may seek reimbursement of a portion or all such amounts from the respective Funds into which those Predecessor Funds have merged at any time within three fiscal years after the fiscal year in which such amounts were waived or reimbursed. Any such recoupment may not cause any Fund’s ordinary operating expenses to exceed the expense limitation that was in place with respect to the relevant Predecessor Fund when the fees were waived or expenses reimbursed. The Adviser will generally seek recoupment only in accordance with the terms of any expense limitation that is in place with respect to the relevant Fund at the time of recoupment.
Fund Recoupment Arrangement Under the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement for JOHCM International Opportunities Fund
Solely with respect to JOHCM International Opportunities Fund (for the purposes of this paragraph, the “Fund”), the Trust and the Adviser have entered into an Amended and Restated Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement dated as of February 1, 2024 (the “Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement”). Under the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement, the Adviser has contractually agreed to waive additional fees and reimburse additional expenses to the extent that Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses of the Fund (excluding brokerage costs, interest, taxes, dividends, litigation and indemnification expenses, expenses associated with investments in underlying investment companies, and extraordinary expenses) exceed 0.50%, 0.60%, 0.75%, and 0.50% for Institutional Shares, Advisor Shares, Investor Shares, and Class Z Shares, respectively, until February 1, 2026. The waiver/reimbursement under the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement is imposed only after the fee waiver and expense reimbursement outlined in the Primary Expense Limitation Agreement has been fully applied. Under the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement, the Adviser (i) cannot recoup any supplemental waiver/reimbursement and (ii) will suspend the payment of any recoupment provided for under the Primary Expense Limitation Agreement until February 1, 2026, the termination date of the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement. Unlike the Primary Expense Limitation Agreement, which contemplates automatic renewal and continuation from year to year, the Supplemental Expense Limitation Agreement may not be renewed or extended past February 1, 2026. It is expected that the Fund’s Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waivers and Reimbursements will revert to a higher level following February 1, 2026.
As of September 30, 2023, the following Funds are subject to recoupment by the Adviser of fees previously waived or reimbursed by J O Hambro Capital Management Limited and/or JOHCM (USA) Inc:
 
Fund Name    Amount
Available
for
Recapture
     Amount of
Recapture
expiring on
September 30,
2026
     Amount of
Recapture
expiring on
September 30,
2025
     Amount of
Recapture
expiring on
September 30,
2024
 
JOHCM Emerging Markets Discovery Fund
   $ 394,598      $ 165,037      $ 108,217      $ 121,344  
JOHCM Emerging Markets Opportunities Fund
   $ 8,080      $ 8,080        N/A        N/A  
JOHCM Global Select Fund
   $ 95,898      $ 69,362      $ 26,536        N/A  
JOHCM International Opportunities Fund
   $ 163,716      $ 63,071      $ 52,934      $ 47,711  
JOHCM International Select Fund
   $ 290,951      $ 290,951        N/A        N/A  
Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions
   $ 322,771      $ 56,432      $ 250,001      $ 16,338  
 
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Portfolio Management
The Funds are managed using a team-based approach. Each of the Funds is managed jointly and primarily by one or more investment professionals and may be supported by analysts. The members of the Funds’ management teams, and the name of the Fund for which each team member is responsible, are listed below.
Mohsin Ahmad, CFA
Fund Manager
Regnan Global Equity Impact Solutions
Mohsin Ahmad joined JOHCM in April 2020. He previously was a senior analyst on the Hermes Impact Opportunities Fund, having joined Hermes Investment Management in 2017. Prior to joining Hermes, he was an investment manager in Global Equities at Pictet Asset Management. Mohsin was a generalist on the World Equities Fund and covered energy and specialty chemicals sectors for the Global Major Players Fund. During his time at Pictet, Mohsin worked in Geneva with thematic equity funds including, Water, Clean Energy and Agriculture. Mohsin started his career at Savills Commercial in London within Investment and European Valuations. Mohsin holds a BA and MA in Land Economy from Cambridge University and is a CFA charterholder.
Emery Brewer
Senior Fund Manager
JOHCM Emerging Markets Discovery Fund
Emery Brewer is Senior Fund Manager of the J O Hambro Emerging Markets Small Cap strategy and joined JOHCM in March 2010, following a brief retirement from 2008 to 2010. He has over 28 years of experience