Goldman Sachs Trust
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Prospectus
February 28, 2023
GOLDMAN SACHS INTERNATIONAL EQUITY INSIGHTS FUNDS
             
THE SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION HAS NOT APPROVED OR DISAPPROVED THESE SECURITIES OR PASSED UPON THE ADEQUACY OF THIS PROSPECTUS. ANY REPRESENTATION TO THE CONTRARY IS A CRIMINAL OFFENSE.
AN INVESTMENT IN A FUND IS NOT A BANK DEPOSIT AND IS NOT INSURED BY THE FEDERAL DEPOSIT
INSURANCE CORPORATION OR ANY OTHER GOVERNMENT AGENCY. AN INVESTMENT IN A FUND INVOLVES
INVESTMENT RISKS, AND YOU MAY LOSE MONEY IN A FUND.
Goldman Sachs Emerging Markets Equity Insights Fund
Class A Shares: GERAX
Class C Shares: GERCX
Institutional Shares: GERIX
Investor Shares: GIRPX
Class R Shares: GRRPX
Class R6 Shares: GERUX
Goldman Sachs International Equity Insights Fund
Class A Shares: GCIAX
Class C Shares: GCICX
Institutional Shares: GCIIX
Service Shares: GCISX
Investor Shares: GCITX
Class R Shares: GCIRX
Class R6 Shares: GCIUX
Goldman Sachs International Small Cap Insights Fund
Class A Shares: GICAX
Class C Shares: GICCX
Institutional Shares: GICIX
Investor Shares: GIRLX
Class R6 Shares: GICUX

Table of Contents

Goldman Sachs Emerging Markets Equity Insights Fund—Summary
Investment Objective
The Goldman Sachs Emerging Markets Equity Insights Fund (the "Fund") seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A Shares if you invest at least $50,000 in Goldman Sachs Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Shareholder Guide—Common Questions Applicable to the Purchase of Class A Shares” beginning on page 40 and Appendix C on page 82 of the Prospectus and “Other Information Regarding Maximum Sales Charge, Purchases, Redemptions, Exchanges and Dividends” beginning on page B-158 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a
percentage of offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of the
lower of original purchase price or sale proceeds)1
None
1.00%
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Management Fees
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
1.00%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
0.75%
None
None
0.50%
None
Other Expenses
0.26%
0.51%
0.14%
0.26%
0.26%
0.13%
Service Fees
None
0.25%
None
None
None
None
All Other Expenses
0.26%
0.26%
0.14%
0.26%
0.26%
0.13%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.51%
2.26%
1.14%
1.26%
1.76%
1.13%
Fee Waiver and Expense Limitation2
(0.11)%
(0.11)%
(0.05)%
(0.11)%
(0.11)%
(0.05)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Fee Waiver and
Expense Limitation
1.40%
2.15%
1.09%
1.15%
1.65%
1.08%
1
A contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) of 1.00% is imposed on Class C Shares redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
2
The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (excluding acquired fund fees and expenses, transfer agency fees and expenses, service fees, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, expenses of shareholder meetings, litigation and indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) to 0.054% of the Fund’s average daily net assets. Additionally, Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC ("Goldman Sachs"), the Fund's transfer agent, has agreed to waive a portion of its transfer agency fee (a component of "Other Expenses") equal to 0.06% as an annual percentage rate of the average daily net assets attributable to Class A, Class C, Investor and Class R Shares of the Fund. These arrangements will remain in effect through at least February 28, 2024, and prior to such date, the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
1

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same  (except that the Example incorporates any applicable fee waiver and/or expense limitation arrangements for only the first year). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$685
$991
$1,319
$2,244
Class C Shares
$318
$696
$1,200
$2,587
Institutional Shares
$111
$357
$623
$1,382
Investor Shares
$117
$389
$681
$1,513
Class R Shares
$168
$543
$944
$2,064
Class R6 Shares
$110
$354
$617
$1,370
Class C Shares – Assuming no redemption
$218
$696
$1,200
$2,587

Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s portfolio turnover rate for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022 was 167% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Strategy
The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets plus any borrowings for investment purposes (measured at the time of purchase) (“Net Assets”) in a diversified portfolio of equity investments in emerging country issuers. Currently, emerging countries include, among others, Central and South American, African, Asian and Eastern European countries. Under normal circumstances, the Fund maintains investments in at least six emerging countries.
The portfolio management team uses two distinct strategies—a bottom-up stock selection strategy and a top-down country/currency selection strategy—to manage the Fund. The Fund seeks broad representation of large-cap and mid-cap issuers across emerging countries, with some exposure to small-cap issuers.
The Fund uses a quantitative style of management, in combination with a qualitative overlay, that emphasizes fundamentally-based stock and country/currency selection, careful portfolio construction and efficient implementation. The Fund’s investments are selected using fundamental research and a variety of quantitative techniques based on certain investment themes, including, among others, Fundamental Mispricings, High Quality Business Models, Sentiment Analysis and Market Themes & Trends. Fundamental Mispricings seeks to identify high-quality businesses trading at a fair price, which the Investment Adviser believes leads to strong performance over the long-run. High Quality Business Models seeks to identify companies that are generating high-quality revenues with sustainable business models and aligned management incentives. Sentiment Analysis seeks to identify stocks experiencing improvements in their overall market sentiment. Market Themes and Trends seeks to identify companies positively positioned to benefit from themes and trends in the market and macroeconomic environment. As a part of the Investment Adviser’s investment selection process, the Investment Adviser utilizes proprietary models that assess a wide range of indicators, which may include certain environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) indicators. No one indicator, risk or consideration is determinative in the investment selection process. The Fund may make investment decisions that deviate from those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary models, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser. In addition, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, make changes to its quantitative techniques, or use other quantitative techniques that are based on the Investment Adviser’s proprietary research.
The Fund may also invest in fixed income securities that are considered to be cash equivalents.
The Fund’s benchmark index is the MSCI Emerging Markets Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged).
THE FUND IS “NON-DIVERSIFIED” UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940, AS AMENDED, AND MAY INVEST A LARGER PERCENTAGE OF ITS ASSETS IN FEWER ISSUERS THAN DIVERSIFIED MUTUAL FUNDS.
Principal Risks of the Fund
Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing. The Fund's principal risks are presented below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
2

Asian Investment Risk. Investing in certain Asian issuers may involve a higher degree of risk and special considerations not typically associated with investing in issuers from more established economies or securities markets. The Fund’s investments in Asian issuers increase the risks to the Fund of conditions and developments that may be particular to Asian countries, such as: volatile economic cycles and/or securities markets; adverse changes to exchange rates; social, political, military, regulatory, economic or environmental developments; or natural disasters.
Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk. Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation; less public information; less stringent investor protections; less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards; and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. The imposition of sanctions, exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments, or from problems in share registration, settlement or custody, may also result in losses. The type and severity of sanctions and other similar measures, including counter sanctions and other retaliatory actions, that may be imposed could vary broadly in scope, and their impact is impossible to predict. For example, the imposition of sanctions and other similar measures could, among other things, cause a decline in the value and/or liquidity of securities issued by the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country and increase market volatility and disruption in the sanctioned country and throughout the world. Sanctions and other similar measures could limit or prevent the Fund from buying and selling securities (in the sanctioned country and other markets), significantly delay or prevent the settlement of securities transactions, and significantly impact the Fund’s liquidity and performance. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. These risks are more pronounced in connection with the Fund’s investments in securities of issuers located in, or otherwise economically tied to, emerging countries.
Investment Style Risk. Different investment styles (e.g., “growth”, “value” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions and investor sentiment. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.
Large Shareholder Transactions Risk. The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders purchase or redeem large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may cause the Fund to sell portfolio securities at times when it would not otherwise do so, which may negatively impact the Fund's  net asset value ("NAV")  and liquidity. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect the Fund's performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash or otherwise maintains a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs. In addition, a large redemption could result in the Fund's current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the Fund's expense ratio.
Liquidity Risk. The Fund may make investments that are illiquid or that may become less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Illiquid investments may be more difficult to value and more difficult to sell at the desired times and prices. Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that the Fund will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period because of unusual market conditions, declining prices of the securities sold, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. To meet redemption requests, the Fund may be forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions and prices. These risks may be more pronounced in connection with the Fund's investments in securities of issuers located in emerging market countries. Redemptions by large shareholders may have a negative impact on the Fund’s liquidity.
Management Risk. A strategy used by the Investment Adviser may fail to produce the intended results. The Investment Adviser attempts to execute a complex strategy for the Fund using proprietary quantitative models. Investments selected using these models may perform differently than expected as a result of the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues in the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software issues). There is no guarantee that the Investment Adviser’s use of these quantitative models will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund. Additionally, commonality of holdings across quantitative money managers may amplify losses.
Market Risk. The value of the securities in which the Fund  invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets. Events such as war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, social unrest, natural disasters, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, the spread of infectious illness or other public health threats could also significantly impact the Fund and its investments.
Non-Diversification Risk. The Fund is non-diversified, meaning that it is permitted to invest a larger percentage of its assets in one or more issuers or in fewer issuers than diversified  mutual funds. Thus, the Fund may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting any single issuer held in its portfolio, and may be more susceptible to greater losses because of these developments.
Portfolio Turnover Rate Risk. A high rate of portfolio turnover involves correspondingly greater expenses which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in short-term capital gains taxable to shareholders.
Stock Risk. Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.
3

Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing: (a) changes in the performance of the Fund’s Institutional Shares from year to year; and (b) how the average annual total returns of the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares compare to those of a broad-based securities market index. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost at www.gsamfunds.com/performance or by calling the appropriate phone number on the back cover of the Prospectus.
Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
CALENDAR YEAR (INSTITUTIONAL)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter ended
Best Quarter Return
20.11%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-23.96%
March 31, 2020
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURN
For the period ended December 31, 2022
 
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Since
Inception
Inception
Date
Class A Shares
 
 
 
 
10/5/2007
Returns Before Taxes
-25.76%
-3.15%
1.14%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
-25.77%
-3.99%
0.53%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-14.61%
-1.95%
1.15%
 
MSCI Emerging Markets Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged; reflects no deduction
for fees or expenses)
-20.09%
-1.40%
1.44%
 
Class C Shares
 
 
 
 
10/5/2007
Returns Before Taxes
-22.86%
-2.79%
0.94%*
 
MSCI Emerging Markets Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged; reflects no deduction
for fees or expenses)
-20.09%
-1.40%
1.44%
 
Institutional Shares
 
 
 
 
10/5/2007
Returns Before Taxes
-21.20%
-1.69%
2.09%
 
MSCI Emerging Markets Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged; reflects no deduction
for fees or expenses)
-20.09%
-1.40%
1.44%
 
Investor Shares
 
 
 
 
8/31/2010
Returns Before Taxes
-21.32%
-1.82%
1.96%
 
MSCI Emerging Markets Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged; reflects no deduction
for fees or expenses)
-20.09%
-1.40%
1.44%
 
Class R Shares
 
 
 
 
2/28/2014
Returns
-21.63%
-2.29%
N/A
2.62%
 
MSCI Emerging Markets Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged; reflects no deduction
for fees or expenses)
-20.09%
-1.40%
N/A
2.33%
 
Class R6 Shares
 
 
 
 
7/31/2015
Returns Before Taxes
-21.22%
-1.68%
2.10%**
 
MSCI Emerging Markets Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged; reflects no deduction
for fees or expenses)
-20.09%
-1.40%
1.44%
 
*
Class C Shares automatically convert into Class A Shares eight years after the purchase date. The 10-Year performance for Class C Shares does not reflect the conversion to Class A Shares after the first eight years of performance.
**
Class R6 Shares commenced operations on July 31, 2015. Prior to that date, the performance of Class R6 Shares shown in the table above is that of Institutional Shares Performance has not been adjusted to reflect the lower expenses of Class R6 Shares. Class R6 Shares would have had higher returns because: (i) Institutional Shares and Class R6 Shares represent interests in the same portfolio of securities; and (ii) Class R6 Shares have lower expenses.
4

The after-tax returns are for Class A Shares only. The after-tax returns for Class C, Institutional, Investor and Class R6 Shares, and returns for Class R Shares (which are offered exclusively to employee benefit plans), will vary. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. In addition, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold Fund Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Portfolio Management
Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).
Portfolio Managers: Len Ioffe, CFA, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2008; Osman Ali, CFA, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2015; Takashi Suwabe, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2021; and Dennis Walsh, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2012.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C Shares is, generally, $1,000. The minimum initial investment for Institutional Shares is, generally, $1,000,000 for individual or certain institutional investors or certain wrap account sponsors, alone or in combination with other assets under the management of the Investment Adviser and its affiliates. There is no minimum for initial purchases of Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares, except for certain institutional investors who purchase Class R6 Shares directly with the Fund’s transfer agent for which the minimum initial investment is $5,000,000. Those share classes with a minimum initial investment requirement do not impose it on certain employee benefit plans, and Institutional Shares do not impose it on certain investment advisers investing on behalf of other accounts.
The minimum subsequent investment for Class A and Class C shareholders is $50, except for certain employee benefit plans, for which there is no minimum. There is no minimum subsequent investment for Institutional, Investor, Class R or Class R6 shareholders.
You may purchase and redeem (sell) shares of the Fund on any business day through certain intermediaries that have a relationship with Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC (“Goldman Sachs”), including banks, trust companies, brokers, registered investment advisers and other financial institutions (“Intermediaries”).
Tax Information
For important tax information, please see “Tax Information” on page 16 of the Prospectus.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
Other Financial Intermediaries
For important information about financial intermediary compensation, please see “Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” on page 16 of the Prospectus.
5

Goldman Sachs International Equity Insights Fund—Summary
Investment Objective
The Goldman Sachs International Equity Insights Fund (the "Fund") seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A Shares if you invest at least $50,000 in Goldman Sachs Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Shareholder Guide—Common Questions Applicable to the Purchase of Class A Shares” beginning on page 40 and Appendix C on page 82 of the Prospectus and “Other Information Regarding Maximum Sales Charge, Purchases, Redemptions, Exchanges and Dividends” beginning on page B-158 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Service
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on
Purchases (as a percentage of offering price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a
percentage of the lower of original purchase
price or sale proceeds)1
None
1.00%
None
None
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Service
Investor
Class R
Class R6
Management Fees
0.76%
0.76%
0.76%
0.76%
0.76%
0.76%
0.76%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
0.75%
None
0.25%
None
0.50%
None
Other Expenses
0.21%
0.46%
0.09%
0.34%
0.21%
0.21%
0.08%
Service Fees
None
0.25%
None
None
None
None
None
Shareholder Administration Fees
None
None
None
0.25%
None
None
None
All Other Expenses
0.21%
0.21%
0.09%
0.09%
0.21%
0.21%
0.08%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.22%
1.97%
0.85%
1.35%
0.97%
1.47%
0.84%
Expense Limitation2
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After
Expense Limitation
1.18%
1.93%
0.81%
1.31%
0.93%
1.43%
0.80%
1
A contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) of 1.00% is imposed on Class C Shares redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
2
The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (excluding acquired fund fees and expenses, transfer agency fees and expenses, service fees, shareholder administration fees, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, expenses of shareholder meetings, litigation and indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) to 0.004% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least February 28, 2024, and prior to such date, the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in Class A, Class C, Institutional, Service, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Class A, Class C, Institutional, Service, Investor, Class R and/or Class R6 Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the
6

Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates any applicable fee waiver and/or expense limitation arrangements for only the first year). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$664
$912
$1,180
$1,943
Class C Shares
$296
$614
$1,059
$2,293
Institutional Shares
$83
$267
$467
$1,045
Service Shares
$133
$424
$736
$1,620
Investor Shares
$95
$305
$532
$1,186
Class R Shares
$146
$461
$799
$1,754
Class R6 Shares
$82
$264
$462
$1,033
Class C Shares – Assuming no redemption
$196
$614
$1,059
$2,293

Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s portfolio turnover rate for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022 was 151% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Strategy
The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets plus any borrowings for investment purposes (measured at the time of purchase) (“Net Assets”) in a broadly diversified portfolio of equity investments in non-U.S. issuers.
The portfolio management team uses two distinct strategies—a bottom-up stock selection strategy and a top-down country/currency selection strategy—to manage the Fund.
The Fund intends to have investments economically tied to at least three countries not including the United States and may invest in the securities economically tied to emerging market countries. The Fund seeks broad representation of large-cap and mid-cap issuers across major countries and sectors of the international economy, with some exposure to small-cap issuers.
The Fund uses a quantitative style of management, in combination with a qualitative overlay, that emphasizes fundamentally-based stock and country/currency selection, careful portfolio construction and efficient implementation. The Fund’s investments are selected using fundamental research and a variety of quantitative techniques based on certain investment themes, including, among others, Fundamental Mispricings, High Quality Business Models, Sentiment Analysis and Market Themes & Trends. Fundamental Mispricings seeks to identify high-quality businesses trading at a fair price, which the Investment Adviser believes leads to strong performance over the long-run. High Quality Business Models seeks to identify companies that are generating high-quality revenues with sustainable business models and aligned management incentives. Sentiment Analysis seeks to identify stocks experiencing improvements in their overall market sentiment. Market Themes and Trends seeks to identify companies positively positioned to benefit from themes and trends in the market and macroeconomic environment. As a part of the Investment Adviser’s investment selection process, the Investment Adviser utilizes proprietary models that assess a wide range of indicators, which may include certain environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) indicators. No one indicator, risk or consideration is determinative in the investment selection process. The Fund may make investment decisions that deviate from those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary models, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser. In addition, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, make changes to its quantitative techniques, or use other quantitative techniques that are based on the Investment Adviser’s proprietary research.
The Fund may also invest in fixed income securities that are considered to be cash equivalents.
The Fund’s benchmark index is the MSCI EAFE Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged).
Principal Risks of the Fund
Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing. The Fund's principal risks are presented below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk. Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation; less public information; less stringent investor protections; less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards; and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. The
7

imposition of sanctions, exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments, or from problems in share registration, settlement or custody, may also result in losses. The type and severity of sanctions and other similar measures, including counter sanctions and other retaliatory actions, that may be imposed could vary broadly in scope, and their impact is impossible to predict. For example, the imposition of sanctions and other similar measures could, among other things, cause a decline in the value and/or liquidity of securities issued by the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country and increase market volatility and disruption in the sanctioned country and throughout the world. Sanctions and other similar measures could limit or prevent the Fund from buying and selling securities (in the sanctioned country and other markets), significantly delay or prevent the settlement of securities transactions, and significantly impact the Fund’s liquidity and performance. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. These risks are more pronounced in connection with the Fund’s investments in securities of issuers located in, or otherwise economically tied to, emerging countries.
Investment Style Risk. Different investment styles (e.g., “growth”, “value” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions and investor sentiment. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.
Large Shareholder Transactions Risk. The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders purchase or redeem large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may cause the Fund to sell portfolio securities at times when it would not otherwise do so, which may negatively impact the Fund's  net asset value ("NAV")  and liquidity. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect the Fund's performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash or otherwise maintains a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs. In addition, a large redemption could result in the Fund's current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the Fund's expense ratio.
Management Risk. A strategy used by the Investment Adviser may fail to produce the intended results. The Investment Adviser attempts to execute a complex strategy for the Fund using proprietary quantitative models. Investments selected using these models may perform differently than expected as a result of the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues in the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software issues). There is no guarantee that the Investment Adviser’s use of these quantitative models will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund. Additionally, commonality of holdings across quantitative money managers may amplify losses.
Market Risk. The value of the securities in which the Fund  invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets. Events such as war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, social unrest, natural disasters, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, the spread of infectious illness or other public health threats could also significantly impact the Fund and its investments.
Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk. Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.
Portfolio Turnover Rate Risk. A high rate of portfolio turnover involves correspondingly greater expenses which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in short-term capital gains taxable to shareholders.
Stock Risk. Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.
Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing: (a) changes in the performance of the Fund’s Institutional Shares from year to year; and (b) how the average annual total returns of the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional, Service, Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares compare to those of a broad-based securities market index. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost at www.gsamfunds.com/performance or by calling the appropriate phone number on the back cover of the Prospectus. Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
8

CALENDAR YEAR (INSTITUTIONAL)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter ended
Best Quarter Return
17.88%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-24.63%
March 31, 2020
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURN
For the period ended December 31, 2022
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A Shares
 
 
 
8/15/1997
Returns Before Taxes
-19.87%
-1.04%
4.32%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
-20.32%
-1.57%
3.78%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-11.06%
-0.60%
3.50%
 
Class C Shares
 
 
 
8/15/1997
Returns Before Taxes
-16.72%
-0.65%
4.13%*
 
Institutional Shares
 
 
 
8/15/1997
Returns Before Taxes
-14.94%
0.46%
5.31%
 
Service Shares
 
 
 
8/15/1997
Returns Before Taxes
-15.37%
-0.04%
4.79%
 
Investor Shares
 
 
 
11/30/2007
Returns Before Taxes
-14.99%
0.35%
5.18%
 
Class R Shares
 
 
 
11/30/2007
Returns
-15.46%
-0.16%
4.65%
 
Class R6 Shares
 
 
 
7/31/2015
Returns Before Taxes
-14.88%
0.47%
5.32%**
 
MSCI EAFE Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged; reflects no deduction for fees or expenses)
-14.45%
1.54%
4.67%
 
*
Class C Shares automatically convert into Class A Shares eight years after the purchase date. The 10-Year performance for Class C Shares does not reflect the conversion to Class A Shares after the first eight years of performance.
**
Class R6 Shares commenced operations on July 31, 2015. Prior to that date, the performance of Class R6 Shares shown in the table above is that of Institutional Shares Performance has not been adjusted to reflect the lower expenses of Class R6 Shares. Class R6 Shares would have had higher returns because: (i) Institutional Shares and Class R6 Shares represent interests in the same portfolio of securities; and (ii) Class R6 Shares have lower expenses.
The after-tax returns are for Class A Shares only. The after-tax returns for Class C, Institutional, Service, Investor and Class R6 Shares, and returns for Class R Shares (which are offered exclusively to employee benefit plans), will vary. After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. In addition, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold Fund Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Portfolio Management
Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).
Portfolio Managers: Len Ioffe, CFA, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 1997; Osman Ali, CFA, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2013; Takashi Suwabe, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2013; and Dennis Walsh, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2021.
9

Buying and Selling Fund Shares
The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C Shares is, generally, $1,000. The minimum initial investment for Institutional Shares is, generally, $1,000,000 for individual or certain institutional investors or certain wrap account sponsors, alone or in combination with other assets under the management of the Investment Adviser and its affiliates. There is no minimum for initial purchases of Investor, Class R and Class R6 Shares, except for certain institutional investors who purchase Class R6 Shares directly with the Fund’s transfer agent for which the minimum initial investment is $5,000,000. Those share classes with a minimum initial investment requirement do not impose it on certain employee benefit plans, and Institutional Shares do not impose it on certain investment advisers investing on behalf of other accounts.
The minimum subsequent investment for Class A and Class C shareholders is $50, except for certain employee benefit plans, for which there is no minimum. There is no minimum subsequent investment for Institutional, Investor, Class R or Class R6 shareholders.
The Fund does not impose minimum purchase requirements for initial or subsequent investments in Service Shares, although an Intermediary (as defined below) may impose such minimums and/or establish other requirements such as a minimum account balance.
You may purchase and redeem (sell) shares of the Fund on any business day through certain intermediaries that have a relationship with Goldman Sachs, including banks, trust companies, brokers, registered investment advisers and other financial institutions (“Intermediaries”).
Tax Information
For important tax information, please see “Tax Information” on page 16 of the Prospectus.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
Other Financial Intermediaries
For important information about financial intermediary compensation, please see “Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” on page 16 of the Prospectus.
10

Goldman Sachs International Small Cap Insights Fund—Summary
Investment Objective
The Goldman Sachs International Small Cap Insights Fund (the "Fund") seeks long-term growth of capital.
Fees and Expenses of the Fund
This table describes the fees and expenses that you may pay if you buy, hold and sell shares of the Fund. You may pay other fees, such as brokerage commissions and other fees to financial intermediaries, which are not reflected in the table and Example below. You may qualify for sales charge discounts on purchases of Class A Shares if you invest at least $50,000 in Goldman Sachs Funds. More information about these and other discounts is available from your financial professional and in “Shareholder Guide—Common Questions Applicable to the Purchase of Class A Shares” beginning on page 40 and Appendix C on page 82 of the Prospectus and “Other Information Regarding Maximum Sales Charge, Purchases, Redemptions, Exchanges and Dividends” beginning on page B-158 of the Fund’s Statement of Additional Information (“SAI”).
Shareholder Fees
(fees paid directly from your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R6
Maximum Sales Charge (Load) Imposed on Purchases (as a percentage of offering
price)
5.50%
None
None
None
None
Maximum Deferred Sales Charge (Load) (as a percentage of the lower of original
purchase price or sale proceeds)1
None
1.00%
None
None
None
Annual Fund Operating Expenses
(expenses that you pay each year as a percentage of the value of your investment)
 
Class A
Class C
Institutional
Investor
Class R6
Management Fees
0.82%
0.82%
0.82%
0.82%
0.82%
Distribution and/or Service (12b-1) Fees
0.25%
0.75%
None
None
None
Other Expenses
0.21%
0.46%
0.09%
0.21%
0.08%
Service Fees
None
0.25%
None
None
None
All Other Expenses
0.21%
0.21%
0.09%
0.21%
0.08%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses
1.28%
2.03%
0.91%
1.03%
0.90%
Expense Limitation2
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
(0.04)%
Total Annual Fund Operating Expenses After Expense Limitation
1.24%
1.99%
0.87%
0.99%
0.86%
1
A contingent deferred sales charge (“CDSC”) of 1.00% is imposed on Class C Shares redeemed within 12 months of purchase.
2
The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (excluding acquired fund fees and expenses, transfer agency fees and expenses, service fees, taxes, interest, brokerage fees, expenses of shareholder meetings, litigation and indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) to 0.014% of the Fund’s average daily net assets through at least February 28, 2024, and prior to such date, the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangement without the approval of the Board of Trustees.
Expense Example
This Example is intended to help you compare the cost of investing in the Fund with the cost of investing in other mutual funds.
11

The Example assumes that you invest $10,000 in Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor and/or Class R6 Shares of the Fund for the time periods indicated and then redeem all of your Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor and/or Class R6 Shares at the end of those periods. The Example also assumes that your investment has a 5% return each year and that the Fund’s operating expenses remain the same (except that the Example incorporates any applicable fee waiver and/or expense limitation arrangements for only the first year). Although your actual costs may be higher or lower, based on these assumptions your costs would be:
 
1 Year
3 Years
5 Years
10 Years
Class A Shares
$669
$930
$1,210
$2,007
Class C Shares
$302
$633
$1,089
$2,355
Institutional Shares
$89
$286
$500
$1,116
Investor Shares
$101
$324
$565
$1,256
Class R6 Shares
$88
$283
$495
$1,104
Class C Shares – Assuming no redemption
$202
$633
$1,089
$2,355

Portfolio Turnover
The Fund pays transaction costs when it buys and sells securities or instruments (i.e., “turns over” its portfolio). A high rate of portfolio turnover may result in increased transaction costs, including brokerage commissions, which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in higher short-term capital gains for taxable shareholders. These costs are not reflected in the annual fund operating expenses or in the expense example above, but are reflected in the Fund’s performance. The Fund’s portfolio turnover rate for the fiscal year ended October 31, 2022 was 156% of the average value of its portfolio.
Principal Strategy
The Fund invests, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its net assets plus any borrowings for investment purposes (measured at the time of purchase) (“Net Assets”) in a broadly diversified portfolio of equity investments in small-cap non-U.S. issuers. Small-cap issuers will generally have public stock market capitalizations between $300 million and $10 billion. The Fund may also invest in securities outside of this capitalization range.
The Fund uses a quantitative style of management, in combination with a qualitative overlay, that emphasizes fundamentally-based stock selection, careful portfolio construction and efficient implementation. The Fund’s investments are selected using fundamental research and a variety of quantitative techniques based on certain investment themes, including, among others, Fundamental Mispricings, High Quality Business Models, Sentiment Analysis and Market Themes & Trends. Fundamental Mispricings seeks to identify high-quality businesses trading at a fair price, which the Investment Adviser believes leads to strong performance over the long-run. High Quality Business Models seeks to identify companies that are generating high-quality revenues with sustainable business models and aligned management incentives. Sentiment Analysis seeks to identify stocks experiencing improvements in their overall market sentiment. Market Themes and Trends seeks to identify companies positively positioned to benefit from themes and trends in the market and macroeconomic environment. As a part of the Investment Adviser’s investment selection process, the Investment Adviser utilizes proprietary models that assess a wide range of indicators, which may include certain environmental, social and governance (“ESG”) indicators. No one indicator, risk or consideration is determinative in the investment selection process. The Fund may make investment decisions that deviate from those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary models, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser. In addition, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, make changes to its quantitative techniques, or use other quantitative techniques that are based on the Investment Adviser’s proprietary research.
The Fund may also invest in the securities of issuers in emerging countries and fixed income securities that are considered to be cash equivalents.
The Fund’s benchmark index is the MSCI EAFE Small Cap Index (Net, USD, Unhedged).
Principal Risks of the Fund
Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund. An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) or any government agency. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective. Investments in the Fund involve substantial risks which prospective investors should consider carefully before investing. The Fund's principal risks are presented below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure.
Foreign and Emerging Countries Risk. Foreign securities may be subject to risk of loss because of more or less foreign government regulation; less public information; less stringent investor protections; less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards; and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. The imposition of sanctions, exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), confiscations, trade restrictions (including tariffs) and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments, or from problems in share registration, settlement or custody, may also result in losses. The type and severity of sanctions and other similar measures, including counter sanctions and other retaliatory actions, that may be imposed could vary broadly in scope, and their impact is impossible to predict. For example, the
12

imposition of sanctions and other similar measures could, among other things, cause a decline in the value and/or liquidity of securities issued by the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country and increase market volatility and disruption in the sanctioned country and throughout the world. Sanctions and other similar measures could limit or prevent the Fund from buying and selling securities (in the sanctioned country and other markets), significantly delay or prevent the settlement of securities transactions, and significantly impact the Fund’s liquidity and performance. Foreign risk also involves the risk of negative foreign currency exchange rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. These risks are more pronounced in connection with the Fund’s investments in securities of issuers located in, or otherwise economically tied to, emerging countries.
Investment Style Risk. Different investment styles (e.g., “growth”, “value” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions and investor sentiment. The Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles.
Large Shareholder Transactions Risk. The Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders purchase or redeem large amounts of shares of the Fund. Such large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may cause the Fund to sell portfolio securities at times when it would not otherwise do so, which may negatively impact the Fund's  net asset value ("NAV")  and liquidity. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect the Fund's performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash or otherwise maintains a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs. In addition, a large redemption could result in the Fund's current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the Fund's expense ratio.
Management Risk. A strategy used by the Investment Adviser may fail to produce the intended results. The Investment Adviser attempts to execute a complex strategy for the Fund using proprietary quantitative models. Investments selected using these models may perform differently than expected as a result of the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, and technical issues in the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software issues). There is no guarantee that the Investment Adviser’s use of these quantitative models will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund. Additionally, commonality of holdings across quantitative money managers may amplify losses.
Market Risk. The value of the securities in which the Fund  invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world due to increasingly interconnected global economies and financial markets. Events such as war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, social unrest, natural disasters, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, the spread of infectious illness or other public health threats could also significantly impact the Fund and its investments.
Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk. Investments in mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies. These securities may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements and may lack sufficient market liquidity, and these issuers often face greater business risks.
Portfolio Turnover Rate Risk. A high rate of portfolio turnover involves correspondingly greater expenses which must be borne by the Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in short-term capital gains taxable to shareholders.
Stock Risk. Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future.
Performance
The bar chart and table below provide an indication of the risks of investing in the Fund by showing: (a) changes in the performance of the Fund’s Institutional Shares from year to year; and (b) how the average annual total returns of the Fund’s Class A, Class C, Institutional, Investor and Class R6 Shares compare to those of a broad-based securities market index. The Fund’s past performance, before and after taxes, is not necessarily an indication of how the Fund will perform in the future. Updated performance information is available at no cost at www.gsamfunds.com/performance or by calling the appropriate phone number on the back cover of the Prospectus.
Performance reflects applicable fee waivers and/or expense limitations in effect during the periods shown.
13

CALENDAR YEAR (INSTITUTIONAL)
During the periods shown in the chart above:
Returns
Quarter ended
Best Quarter Return
22.03%
June 30, 2020
Worst Quarter Return
-28.26%
March 31, 2020
AVERAGE ANNUAL TOTAL RETURN
For the period ended December 31, 2022
 
 
 
 
1 Year
5 Years
10 Years
Inception
Date
Class A Shares
 
 
 
9/28/2007
Returns Before Taxes
-23.32%
-1.91%
5.27%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions
-23.60%
-2.35%
4.49%
 
Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares
-13.28%
-1.35%
4.11%
 
Class C Shares
 
 
 
9/28/2007
Returns Before Taxes
-20.27%
-1.55%
5.06%*
 
Institutional Shares
 
 
 
9/28/2007
Returns Before Taxes
-18.55%
-0.42%
6.27%
 
Investor Shares
 
 
 
8/31/2010
Returns Before Taxes
-18.67%
-0.55%
6.12%
 
Class R6 Shares
 
 
 
7/31/2015
Returns Before Taxes
-18.58%
-0.43%
6.30%**
 
MSCI EAFE Small Cap Index (Net, USD, Unhedged; reflects no deduction for fees or expenses)
-21.39%
-0.05%
6.21%
 
*
Class C Shares automatically convert into Class A Shares eight years after the purchase date. The 10-Year performance for Class C Shares does not reflect the conversion to Class A Shares after the first eight years of performance.
**
Class R6 Shares commenced operations on July 31, 2015. Prior to that date, the performance of Class R6 Shares shown in the table above is that of Institutional Shares Performance has not been adjusted to reflect the lower expenses of Class R6 Shares. Class R6 Shares would have had higher returns because: (i) Institutional Shares and Class R6 Shares represent interests in the same portfolio of securities; and (ii) Class R6 Shares have lower expenses.
The after-tax returns are for Class A Shares only. The after-tax returns for Class C, Institutional, Investor and Class R6 Shares will vary After-tax returns are calculated using the historical highest individual federal marginal income tax rates and do not reflect the impact of state and local taxes. Actual after-tax returns depend on an investor’s tax situation and may differ from those shown. In addition, the after-tax returns shown are not relevant to investors who hold Fund Shares through tax-deferred arrangements such as 401(k) plans or individual retirement accounts.
Portfolio Management
Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. is the investment adviser for the Fund (the “Investment Adviser” or “GSAM”).
Portfolio Managers: Len Ioffe, CFA, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2007; Osman Ali, CFA, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2013; Takashi Suwabe, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2013; and Dennis Walsh, Managing Director and Senior Portfolio Manager, has managed the Fund since 2021.
Buying and Selling Fund Shares
The minimum initial investment for Class A and Class C Shares is, generally, $1,000. The minimum initial investment for Institutional Shares is, generally, $1,000,000 for individual or certain institutional investors, alone or in combination with other assets under the management of the Investment Adviser and its affiliates. There is no minimum for initial purchases of Investor and Class R6 Shares, except for certain institutional investors who purchase Class R6 Shares directly with the Fund’s transfer agent for which the minimum initial investment is $5,000,000. Those share classes with a minimum initial investment requirement do not impose it on certain employee benefit plans, and Institutional Shares do not impose it on certain investment advisers investing on behalf of other accounts.
14

The minimum subsequent investment for Class A and Class C shareholders is $50, except for certain employee benefit plans, for which there is no minimum. There is no minimum subsequent investment for Institutional, Investor or Class R6 shareholders.
The Fund does not impose minimum purchase requirements for initial or subsequent investments in Service Shares, although an Intermediary (as defined below) may impose such minimums and/or establish other requirements such as a minimum account balance.
You may purchase and redeem (sell) shares of the Fund on any business day through certain intermediaries that have a relationship with Goldman Sachs & Co. LLC (“Goldman Sachs”), including banks, trust companies, brokers, registered investment advisers and other financial institutions (“Intermediaries”).
Tax Information
For important tax information, please see “Tax Information” on page 16 of the Prospectus.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
Other Financial Intermediaries
For important information about financial intermediary compensation, please see “Payments to Broker-Dealers and Other Financial Intermediaries” on page 16 of the Prospectus.
15

International Equity Insights Funds –
Additional Summary Information
Tax Information
The Funds' distributions are taxable, and will be taxed as ordinary income or capital gains, unless you are investing through a tax-deferred arrangement, such as a 401(k) plan or an individual retirement account. Investments made through tax-deferred arrangements may become taxable upon withdrawal from such arrangements.
Payments to Broker-Dealers and
Other Financial Intermediaries
If you purchase a Fund through an Intermediary, the Fund and/or its related companies may pay the Intermediary for the sale of Fund shares and related services. These payments may create a conflict of interest by influencing the Intermediary and your salesperson to recommend a Fund over another investment. Ask your salesperson or visit your Intermediary’s website for more information.
16

Investment Management Approach
INVESTMENT OBJECTIVE
The Funds each seek long-term growth of capital. Each Fund’s investment objective may be changed without shareholder approval upon 60 days’ notice.
PRINCIPAL INVESTMENT STRATEGIES
Emerging Markets Equity Insights Fund
The Fund seeks to achieve long-term growth of capital by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its Net Assets in a diversified portfolio of equity investments in emerging country issuers. Shareholders will be provided with sixty days’ notice in the manner prescribed by the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”) before any change in the Fund’s policy to invest at least 80% of its Net Assets in the particular type of investment suggested by its name. The Fund may allocate its assets among emerging countries as determined by the Investment Adviser. The Investment Adviser may consider classifications by MSCI, the World Bank, the International Finance Corporation or the United Nations and its agencies in determining whether a country is emerging or developed. Currently, emerging countries include, among others, Central and South American, African, Asian and Central and Eastern European countries. The Investment Adviser currently intends that the Fund’s investment focus will be in the following emerging countries as well as any other emerging country to the extent that foreign investors are permitted by applicable law to make such investments:
  Brazil
  India
  Qatar
  Chile
  Indonesia
  Saudi Arabia
  China
  Kuwait
  South Africa
  Colombia
  Malaysia
  South Korea
  Czech Republic
  Mexico
  Taiwan
  Egypt
  Peru
  Thailand
  Greece
  Philippines
  Turkey
  Hungary
  Poland
  United Arab Emirates
An emerging country issuer is an issuer economically tied to an emerging market country. In determining whether an issuer is economically tied to an emerging market country, the Investment Adviser will consider whether the issuer:
Has a class of securities whose principal securities market is in an emerging market country;
Has its principal office in an emerging market country;
Derives 50% or more of its total revenue or profit from goods produced, sales made or services provided in one or more emerging market countries; or
Maintains 50% or more of its assets in one or more emerging market countries.
Is otherwise determined to be economically tied to an emerging market country by the Investment Adviser in its discretion. For example, the Investment Adviser may use the classifications assigned by third parties, including an issuer’s “country of risk” as determined by Bloomberg or the classifications assigned to an issuer by the Fund’s benchmark index provider. These classifications are generally based on a number of criteria, including an issuer’s country of domicile, the primary stock exchange on which an issuer’s securities trade, the location from which the majority of an issuer’s revenue is derived, and an issuer’s reporting currency. Although the Investment Adviser may rely on these classifications, it is not required to do so.
Under normal circumstances, the Fund maintains investments in at least six emerging countries.
The Fund seeks to invest broadly in large-cap and mid-cap issuers across emerging market countries. As discussed below under “All Funds,” the Fund uses a quantitative style of management, in combination with a qualitative overlay, that emphasizes fundamentally-based stock selection, careful portfolio construction and efficient implementation. The Fund’s investments are selected using fundamental research and a variety of quantitative techniques based on certain investment themes, including, among others, Fundamental Mispricings, High Quality Business Models, Sentiment Analysis and Market Themes & Trends.
The Fund may also invest in fixed income securities that are considered to be cash equivalents.
The MSCI Emerging Markets Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged) is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index that is constructed using MSCI’s GIMI Methodology. It is designed to measure equity market performance of the large and mid market capitalization segments of emerging markets.
THE FUND IS “NON-DIVERSIFIED” UNDER THE INVESTMENT COMPANY ACT OF 1940, AS AMENDED, AND MAY INVEST A LARGER PERCENTAGE OF ITS ASSETS IN FEWER ISSUERS THAN DIVERSIFIED MUTUAL FUNDS.
17

International Equity Insights Fund
The Fund seeks to achieve long-term growth of capital by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its Net Assets in a broadly diversified portfolio of equity investments in non-U.S. issuers. Shareholders will be provided with sixty days’ notice in the manner prescribed by the SEC before any change in the Fund’s policy to invest at least 80% of its Net Assets in the particular type of investment suggested by its name.
The Fund may allocate its assets among countries as determined by the Investment Adviser from time to time. The Fund intends to have investments economically tied to at least three countries, not including the United States, and may invest in the securities economically tied to emerging market countries.
A non-U.S. issuer is an issuer economically tied to a country other than the United States. In determining whether an issuer is economically tied to a country other than the United States, the Investment Adviser will consider whether the issuer:
Has a class of securities whose principal securities market is in a country other than the United States;
Has its principal office in a country other than the United States;
Derives 50% or more of its total revenue or profit from goods produced, sales made or services provided in one or more countries other than the United States;
Maintains 50% or more of its assets in one or more countries other than the United States; or
Is otherwise determined to be economically tied to a country other than the United States by the Investment Adviser in its discretion. For example, the Investment Adviser may use the classifications assigned by third parties, including an issuer’s “country of risk” as determined by Bloomberg or the classifications assigned to an issuer by the Fund’s benchmark index provider. These classifications are generally based on a number of criteria, including an issuer’s country of domicile, the primary stock exchange on which an issuer’s securities trade, the location from which the majority of an issuer’s revenue is derived, and an issuer’s reporting currency. Although the Investment Adviser may rely on these classifications, it is not required to do so.
The Fund seeks to invest broadly in large-cap and mid-cap issuers across major countries and sectors of the international economy. As discussed below under “All Funds,” the Fund uses a quantitative style of management, in combination with a qualitative overlay, that emphasizes fundamentally-based stock selection, careful portfolio construction and efficient implementation. The Fund’s investments are selected using fundamental research and a variety of quantitative techniques based on certain investment themes, including, among others, Fundamental Mispricings, High Quality Business Models, Sentiment Analysis and Market Themes & Trends.
The Fund may also invest in fixed income securities that are considered to be cash equivalents.
The MSCI EAFE Standard Index (Net, USD, Unhedged) is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index that is designed to measure the equity market performance of large and mid capitalization segments of developed markets, excluding the U.S. and Canada.
International Small Cap Insights Fund
The Fund seeks to achieve long-term growth of capital by investing, under normal circumstances, at least 80% of its Net Assets in a broadly diversified portfolio of equity investments in small cap non-U.S. issuers. Shareholders will be provided with sixty days’ notice in the manner prescribed by the SEC before any change in the Fund’s policy to invest at least 80% of its Net Assets in the particular type of investment suggested by its name. Small-cap issuers will generally have public stock market capitalizations (based upon shares available for trading on an unrestricted basis) between $300 million and $10 billion, however, this capitalization range will change with market conditions. If the market capitalization of a company held by the Fund moves outside of this capitalization range, the Fund may, but is not required to, sell the securities. The Fund may also invest in securities outside of this capitalization range.
The Fund may allocate its assets among countries as determined by the Investment Adviser from time to time. The Fund intends to have investments economically tied to at least three countries, not including the United States, and may invest in the securities economically tied to emerging market countries.
A non-U.S. issuer is an issuer economically tied to a country other than the United States. In determining whether an issuer is economically tied to a country other than the United States, the Investment Adviser will consider whether the issuer:
Has a class of securities whose principal securities market is in a country other than the United States;
Has its principal office in a country other than the United States;
Derives 50% or more of its total revenue or profit from goods produced, sales made or services provided in one or more countries other than the United States;
Maintains 50% or more of its assets in one or more countries other than the United States; or
Is otherwise determined to be economically tied to a country other than the United States by the Investment Adviser in its discretion. For example, the Investment Adviser may use the classifications assigned by third parties, including an issuer’s “country of risk” as determined by Bloomberg or the classifications assigned to an issuer by the Fund’s benchmark index provider. These
18

Investment Management Approach
classifications are generally based on a number of criteria, including an issuer’s country of domicile, the primary stock exchange on which an issuer’s securities trade, the location from which the majority of an issuer’s revenue is derived, and an issuer’s reporting currency. Although the Investment Adviser may rely on these classifications, it is not required to do so.
As discussed below under “All Funds,” the Fund uses a quantitative style of management, in combination with a qualitative overlay, that emphasizes fundamentally-based stock selection, careful portfolio construction and efficient implementation. The Fund’s investments are selected using fundamental research and a variety of quantitative techniques based on certain investment themes, including, among others, Fundamental Mispricings, High Quality Business Models, Sentiment Analysis and Market Themes & Trends.
The Fund may also invest in the securities of issuers in emerging countries and fixed income securities that are considered to be cash equivalents.
The MSCI EAFE Small Cap Index (Net, USD, Unhedged) is a free float-adjusted market capitalization index that is constructed using MSCI’s GIMI Methodology. It is designed to measure the equity market performance of the small market capitalization segment of developed markets, excluding the U.S. and Canada.
ALL FUNDS
A Fund’s investments in derivatives, other investment companies, including ETFs, and other instruments are counted towards the Fund’s 80% investment policy to the extent they have economic characteristics similar to the investments included within that policy. The Funds may, from time to time, take temporary defensive positions that are inconsistent with the Funds’ principal investment strategies in attempting to respond to adverse market, political or other conditions. For temporary defensive purposes, each Fund may invest up to 100% of its total assets in securities issued or guaranteed by the U.S. government, its agencies, instrumentalities or sponsored enterprises (“U.S. Government Securities”), commercial paper rated at least A-2 by S&P Global Ratings (“Standard & Poor’s”), P-2 by Moody’s Investors Service, Inc. (“Moody’s”) or having a comparable credit rating by another nationally recognized statistical rating organization (“NRSRO”) (or, if unrated, determined by the Investment Adviser to be of comparable credit quality), certificates of deposit, bankers’ acceptances, repurchase agreements, non-convertible preferred stocks and non-convertible corporate bonds with a remaining maturity of less than one year, exchange-traded funds (“ETFs”) and other investment companies and cash items. When a Fund’s assets are invested in such instruments, the Fund may not be achieving its investment objective.
GSAM serves as investment adviser to the Funds. GSAM is referred to in the Prospectus as the “Investment Adviser.”
GSAM Quantitative Team’s Investment Philosophy:
GSAM’s quantitative style of fund management emphasizes the three building blocks of active management: fundamentally-based stock and country/currency selection, careful portfolio construction and efficient implementation.
Step 1: Country and Stock Selection
Country Selection (applicable to the Emerging Markets Equity Insights Fund and International Equity Insights Fund). The Investment Adviser forecasts returns of developed markets and emerging markets worldwide. Country return forecasts are determined using proprietary models based on certain investment themes, including, among others, Valuation and Macro. The Valuation theme favors equity and currency markets which appear cheap relative to fundamentals and purchasing power. The Macro theme assesses a market’s macroeconomic environment and growth prospects.
Stock Selection. The Investment Adviser then attempts to forecast expected returns on approximately 10,000 stocks on a daily basis using proprietary models developed by the Quantitative Investment Strategies (“QIS”) team. These models are based on certain investment themes including, among others, Fundamental Mispricings, High Quality Business Models, Sentiment Analysis and Market Themes & Trends. Fundamental Mispricings seeks to identify high-quality businesses trading at a fair price, which the Investment Adviser believes leads to strong performance over the long-run. High Quality Business Models seeks to identify companies that are generating high-quality revenues with sustainable business models and aligned management incentives. Sentiment Analysis seeks to identify stocks experiencing improvements in their overall market sentiment. Market Themes and Trends seeks to identify companies positively positioned to benefit from themes and trends in the market and macroeconomic environment.
As a part of the Investment Adviser’s stock selection process, the Investment Adviser utilizes proprietary models that assess a wide range of indicators, which may include certain environmental, social and governance ("ESG") indicators. The Investment Adviser in its sole discretion may periodically update the indicators used in the investment decision-making process of the Funds.
The indicators applied by the Investment Adviser are assessed in reliance on one or a number of third-party ESG vendors. The Investment Adviser, in its sole discretion, retains the right not to use data provided by third-party vendors where it deems the data to be not representative of a company’s current business operations.
For additional information regarding the investment themes that the Investment Adviser may employ from time to time, please consult the Funds’ SAI.
19

Step 2: Portfolio Construction
The Investment Adviser then seeks to manage risk by maintaining characteristics such as size to be similar to those of the applicable benchmark adjusted for the Investment Adviser’s country views where applicable, and by limiting the size of individual stock positions. The Investment Adviser also seeks to maximize expected excess returns by overweighting stocks with positive characteristics identified in the return models and underweighting stocks with negative characteristics relative to their benchmark weights. The Investment Adviser uses a computer optimizer to evaluate many different security combinations (and consider many possible weightings) in an effort to construct the most efficient portfolio given each Fund’s benchmark. The Investment Adviser also seeks to address climate transition risk by weighting stocks based, in part, on certain proprietary emissions metrics. The Investment Adviser may, in its sole discretion, modify or discontinue the weighting of stocks by proprietary emissions metrics.
Step 3: Efficient Implementation
The portfolio management team considers transaction costs at various steps of the investment process. The team incorporates expected portfolio turnover when assigning weights to the variables in the return model. The team takes into account expected execution costs and evaluates multiple trading options.
Each Fund’s investment selection process generally relies on quantitative techniques. From time to time, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, also utilize a qualitative overlay. As a result of the qualitative overlay, a Fund’s investments may not correspond to those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary models. Each Fund may make investment decisions that deviate from those generated by the Investment Adviser’s proprietary models, at the discretion of the Investment Adviser, for a number of reasons including, but not limited to, corporate actions (e.g., reorganizations, mergers and buy-outs), industry events and/or trading liquidity. In addition, the Investment Adviser may, in its discretion, make changes to its quantitative techniques, or use other quantitative techniques based on the Investment Adviser’s proprietary research. The Investment Adviser employs an investment process that considers a wide range of indicators and risks, and no one indicator, risk or consideration is determinative. For additional information, please consult the Funds’ SAI.
References in the Prospectus to a Fund’s benchmark are for informational purposes only, and unless otherwise noted are not an indication of how a particular Fund is managed.
ADDITIONAL FEES AND EXPENSES INFORMATION
Differences in the “Expense Limitation” ratios across a Fund’s share classes are the result of, among other things, the effect of mathematical rounding on the daily accrual of expense reimbursement, particularly, in respect to share classes with small amounts of assets.
Differences in the “Other Expenses” ratios across a Fund’s share classes are the result of, among other things, contractual differences in transfer agency fees and/or the effect of mathematical rounding on the daily accrual of certain expenses, particularly, in respect to share classes with small amounts of assets.
ADDITIONAL PERFORMANCE INFORMATION
The below is additional information that relates to the “Performance” section of each Fund’s summary section.
Note that the “Best Quarter” and “Worst Quarter” figures shown in the “Performance” section of each Fund’s Summary section are applicable only to the time period covered by the bar chart.
These definitions apply to the after-tax returns shown in the “Performance” section of each Fund’s Summary section.
Average Annual Total Returns Before Taxes. These returns do not reflect taxes on distributions on a Fund’s Shares nor do they show how performance can be impacted by taxes when shares are redeemed (sold) by you.
Average Annual Total Returns After Taxes on Distributions. These returns assume that taxes are paid on distributions on a Fund’s Class A Shares (i.e., dividends and capital gains) but do not reflect taxes that may be incurred upon redemption (sale) of the Class A Shares at the end of the performance period.
Average Annual Total Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares. These returns reflect taxes paid on distributions on a Fund’s Class A Shares and taxes applicable when the shares are redeemed (sold).
Note on Tax Rates. The after-tax performance figures are calculated using the historically highest individual federal marginal income tax rates at the time of the distributions and do not reflect state and local taxes. In calculating the federal income taxes due on redemptions, capital gains taxes resulting from a redemption are subtracted from the redemption proceeds and the tax benefits from
20

Investment Management Approach
capital losses resulting from the redemption are added to the redemption proceeds. Under certain circumstances, the addition of the tax benefits from capital losses resulting from redemptions may cause the Returns After Taxes on Distributions and Sale of Fund Shares to be greater than the Returns After Taxes on Distributions or even the Returns Before Taxes.
OTHER INVESTMENT PRACTICES AND SECURITIES
Although each Fund’s principal investment strategies are described in the Fund’s Summary—Principal Strategy section of the Prospectus, the following tables identify some of the investment techniques that may (but are not required to) be used by the Funds in seeking to achieve their investment objectives. The tables also highlight the differences and similarities among the Funds in their use of these techniques and other investment practices and investment securities. Numbers in these tables show allowable usage only; for actual usage, consult the Funds’ annual/semi-annual report. For more information about these and other investment practices and securities, see Appendix A.
Each Fund publishes on its website (http://www.gsamfunds.com) complete portfolio holdings for the Fund as of the end of each fiscal quarter subject to a 60 calendar-day lag between the date of the information and the date on which the information is disclosed. The Funds may however, at their discretion, publish these holdings earlier than 60 calendar days, if deemed necessary by the Funds. In addition, the Funds publish on their website month-end top ten holdings subject to a fifteen calendar-day lag between the date of the information and the date on which the information is disclosed. In addition, a description of the Funds’ policies and procedures with respect to the disclosure of the Funds’ portfolio holdings is available in the Funds’ SAI.
21

10Percent of total assets (including securities lending collateral) (italic type)
10Percent of net assets (excluding borrowings for investment purposes) (roman type)
  No specific percentage limitation on usage;
limited only by the objectives and strategies of the Fund
— Not permitted
Emerging
Markets
Equity
Insights
Fund
International
Equity
Insights
Fund
International
Small Cap
Insights
Fund
Investment Practices
 
 
 
Borrowings
33 13
33 13
33 13
Cross Hedging of Currencies
Custodial Receipts and Trust Certificates
Equity, Index and Currency Swaps
Foreign Currency Transactions (including forward contracts)
Futures Contracts and Options and Swaps on Futures Contracts1
Illiquid Investments*
15
15
15
Investment Company Securities (including ETFs)**
10
10
10
Options2
Options on Foreign Currencies3
Preferred Stock, Warrants and Stock Purchase Rights
Repurchase Agreements
Securities Lending
33 13
33 13
33 13
Short Sales
Unseasoned Companies
When-Issued Securities and Forward Commitments
*
Illiquid investments are any investments that a Fund reasonably expects cannot be sold or disposed of in current market conditions in seven calendar days or less without the sale or disposition significantly changing the market value of the investment.
**
This percentage limitation does not apply to a Fund’s investments in investment companies (including ETFs) where a higher percentage limitation is permitted under the Investment Company Act or rules, regulations or exemptive relief thereunder.
1
The Funds may enter into futures transactions only with respect to a representative index.
2
The Funds may sell call and put options and purchase call and put options on securities and other instruments in which the Funds invest or any index consisting of securities or other instruments in which they may invest.
3
The Funds may purchase and sell call and put options on foreign currencies.
22

Investment Management Approach
10Percent of total assets (excluding securities lending collateral) (italic type)
10Percent of net assets (including borrowings for investment purposes) (roman type)
  No specific percentage limitation on usage; limited only by the objectives and strategies of the Fund
— Not permitted
Emerging
Markets
Equity
Insights
Fund
International
Equity
Insights
Fund
International
Small Cap
Insights
Fund
Investment Securities
 
 
 
American, European and Global Depositary Receipts
Bank Obligations4
Convertible Securities5
Corporate Debt Obligations4
Derivatives
Emerging Country Securities
Equity Investments
80+
80+
80+
Fixed Income Securities4,6
20
20
20
Foreign Government Securities4
Foreign Securities
Real Estate Investment Trusts (“REITs”)
Structured Securities7
Temporary Investments
U.S. Government Securities4
4
Limited by the amount the Fund invests in fixed income securities and limited to cash equivalents only. The Funds may invest in bank obligations issued by U.S. or foreign banks.
5
The Funds have no minimum rating criteria for convertible debt securities.
6
Except as noted under “Convertible Securities,” fixed income securities must be investment grade (i.e., BBB– or higher by Standard & Poor’s, Baa3 or higher by Moody’s) or have a comparable credit rating by another NRSRO or, if unrated, determined by the Investment Adviser to be of comparable credit quality.
7
Structured securities are not subject to the same minimum credit quality requirements as a Fund’s investments in fixed income securities.
23

Risks of the Funds
Loss of money is a risk of investing in the Fund (which, for the remainder of this Prospectus, refers to one or more of the Funds offered in this Prospectus). An investment in the Fund is not a bank deposit and is not insured or guaranteed by the FDIC or any other governmental agency. The principal risks of the Fund are discussed in the Summary sections of the Prospectus. The following section provides additional information on the risks that apply to the Fund, which may result in a loss of your investment. The risks applicable to the Fund are presented below in alphabetical order, and not in the order of importance or potential exposure. The Fund should not be relied upon as a complete investment program. There can be no assurance that the Fund will achieve its investment objective.
Principal Risk
  Additional Risk
Emerging
Markets
Equity
Insights
Fund
International
Equity
Insights
Fund
International
Small Cap
Insights
Fund
Asian Investment
Credit/Default
Cybersecurity
Derivatives
Emerging Countries
ESG Integration
Foreign
Foreign Custody
Geographic
Greater China
Interest Rate
Investment Style
Large Shareholder Transactions
Liquidity
Management
Market
Mid-Cap and Small-Cap
Net Asset Value (“NAV”)
Non-Diversification
 
 
Portfolio Turnover Rate
Stock
Swaps
Asian Investment Risk—Investing in certain Asian issuers may involve a higher degree of risk and special considerations not typically associated with investing in issuers from more established economies or securities markets. Many Asian countries, including China, can be characterized as either developing or newly industrialized economies and tend to experience more volatile economic cycles than developed countries. Some countries in the region have in the past experienced currency devaluations that resulted in high interest rate levels, sharp reductions in economic activity and significant drops in securities prices.Moreover, as export-driven economies, the economies of these countries are affected by developments in the economies of their principal trading partners, including the U.S. Furthermore, flooding, monsoons and other natural disasters also can significantly affect the value of investments. Some countries in the region have in the past imposed restrictions on converting local currency which prevented foreign firms from selling assets and repatriating funds. Many countries in the region have historically encountered political uncertainty, corruption, military intervention, social unrest and regional armed conflict. Examples include territorial disputes with China, ethnic and sectarian violence in Indonesia and India, armed conflict between India and Pakistan and between North Korea and South Korea, and insurgencies in the Philippines.
Credit/Default Risk—An issuer or guarantor of fixed income securities or instruments held by a Fund (which may have low credit ratings) may default on its obligation to pay interest and repay principal or default on any other obligation. The credit quality of a Fund’s portfolio securities or instruments may meet the Fund’s credit quality requirements at the time of purchase but then deteriorate thereafter, and such a deterioration can occur rapidly. In certain instances, the downgrading or default of a single holding or guarantor of the Fund’s holdings may impair the Fund’s liquidity and have the potential to cause significant NAV deterioration.
Cybersecurity Risk—The Fund may be susceptible to operational and information security risks resulting from cyber-attacks. Cyber-attacks include, among others, stealing or corrupting confidential information and other data that is maintained online or digitally for financial gain, denial-of-service attacks on websites causing operational disruption, and the unauthorized release of
24

Risks of the Funds
confidential information and other data. Cyber-attacks have the ability to cause significant disruptions and impact business operations; to result in financial losses; to prevent shareholders from transacting business; to interfere with the Fund’s calculation of NAV; and to lead to violations of applicable privacy and other laws, regulatory fines, penalties, reputational damage, reimbursement or other compensation costs and/or additional compliance costs. Cyber-attacks affecting the Fund or its Investment Adviser, custodian, Transfer Agent, or other third-party service providers may adversely impact the Fund and its shareholders.
Derivatives Risk—The Fund’s use  of options, futures, forwards, swaps, structured securities and other s and similar instruments (collectively referred to in this paragraph as “derivatives”) may result in losses, including due to adverse market movements. Derivatives, which may pose risks in addition to and greater than those associated with investing directly in securities, currencies or other assets and instruments, may increase market exposure and be illiquid or less liquid, volatile, difficult to price and leveraged so that small changes in the value of the underlying assets or instruments may produce disproportionate losses to the Fund. Certain derivatives are also subject to counterparty risk, which is the risk that the other party in the transaction will not fulfill, or lacks the capacity or authority to fulfill, its contractual obligations, liquidity risk, which includes the risk that the Fund will not be able to close its derivatives position when it is advantageous to do so, and risks arising from margin requirements, which include the risk that the Fund will be required to pay additional margin or set aside additional collateral to maintain open derivative positions. Derivatives may be used for both hedging and non-hedging purposes.
The use of derivatives is a highly specialized activity that involves investment techniques and risks different from those associated with investments in more traditional securities and instruments, and there is no guarantee that the use of derivatives will achieve their intended result. If the Investment Adviser is incorrect in its expectation of the timing or level of fluctuation in securities prices, interest rates, currency prices or other variables, the use of derivatives could result in losses, which in some cases may be significant. A lack of correlation between changes in the value of derivatives and the value of the portfolio assets (if any) being hedged could also result in losses. In addition, there is a risk that the performance of the derivatives or other instruments used by the Investment Adviser to replicate the performance of a particular asset class may not accurately track the performance of that asset class.
The use of derivatives is also subject to operational and legal risks. Operational risks generally refer to risks related to potential operational issues, including documentation issues, settlement issues, system failures, inadequate controls, and human error. Legal risks generally refer to risks of loss resulting from insufficient documentation or legality or enforceability of a contract.
Emerging Countries Risk—Investments in securities of issuers located in, or otherwise economically tied to, emerging countries are subject to the risks associated with investments in foreign securities. The securities markets of most emerging countries are less liquid, developed and efficient, are subject to greater price volatility, and have smaller market capitalizations. In addition, emerging markets and frontier countries may have more or less government regulation and generally do not impose as extensive and frequent accounting, auditing, financial and other reporting requirements as the securities markets of more developed countries. As a result, there could be less information available about issuers in emerging and frontier market countries, which could negatively affect the Investment Adviser’s ability to evaluate local companies or their potential impact on the Fund’s performance. Further, investments in securities of issuers located in certain emerging countries involve the risk of loss resulting from problems in share registration, settlement or custody, substantial economic, political and social disruptions and the imposition of exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions). The legal remedies for investors in emerging and frontier markets may be more limited than the remedies available in the U.S., and the ability of U.S. authorities (e.g., SEC and the U.S. Department of Justice) to bring actions against bad actors may be limited. These risks are not normally associated with investments in more developed countries. For more information about these risks, see Appendix A.
ESG Integration Risk—As a part of the Investment Adviser’s stock selection process, the Investment Adviser utilizes proprietary models that assess a wide range of indicators, which may include certain ESG indicators. The relevance and weightings of specific ESG indicators to or within the investment process varies across asset classes, sectors and strategies and no one factor, consideration or indicator is determinative. When integrating ESG indicators into the investment process, the Investment Adviser may rely on third-party data that it believes to be reliable, but it does not guarantee the accuracy of such third-party data. ESG information from third-party data providers may be incomplete, inaccurate or unavailable, which may adversely impact the investment process. Moreover, ESG information, whether from an external and/or internal source, is, by nature and in many instances, based on a qualitative and subjective assessment. An element of subjectivity and discretion is therefore inherent to the interpretation and use of ESG data. The process for conducting ESG assessments and implementation of ESG views in client/fund portfolios, including the format and content of such analysis and the tools and/or data used to perform such analysis, may also vary among the Investment Adviser’s portfolio management teams. While the Investment Adviser believes that the integration of material ESG indicators into the Fund’s investment process has the potential to identify financial risks and contribute to the Fund’s long-term performance, ESG indicators may not be considered for each and every investment decision, and there is no guarantee that the integration of ESG indicators will result in better performance. Investors can differ in their views of what constitutes positive or negative ESG characteristics. Moreover, the current lack of common standards may result in different approaches to
25

integrating ESG indicators. As a result, the Fund may invest in companies that do not reflect the beliefs and values of any particular investor. The Investment Adviser’s approach to ESG integration may evolve and develop over time, both due to a refinement of investment decision-making processes to address ESG indicators and risks, and because of legal and regulatory developments.
Foreign Risk—When the Fund invests in foreign securities, it may be subject to risk of loss not typically associated with U.S. issuers. Loss may result because of more or less foreign government regulation; less public information; less stringent investor protections; less stringent accounting, corporate governance, financial reporting and disclosure standards; less liquid, developed or efficient trading markets, greater volatility and less economic, political and social stability in the countries in which the Fund invests. Loss may also result from, among other things, deteriorating economic and business conditions in other countries, including the United States, regional and global conflicts, the imposition of sanctions, exchange controls (including repatriation restrictions), foreign taxes, confiscation of assets and property, trade restrictions (including tariffs), expropriations and other government restrictions by the United States and other governments, higher transaction costs, difficulty enforcing contractual obligations or from problems in share registration, settlement or custody. The type and severity of sanctions and other similar measures, including counter sanctions and other retaliatory actions, that may be imposed could vary broadly in scope, and their impact is impossible to predict. These types of measures may include, but are not limited to, banning a sanctioned country from global payment systems that facilitate cross-border payments, restricting the settlement of securities transactions by certain investors, and freezing the assets of particular countries, entities, or persons. The imposition of sanctions and other similar measures could, among other things, cause a decline in the value and/or liquidity of securities issued by the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country, downgrades in the credit ratings of the sanctioned country or companies located in or economically tied to the sanctioned country, devaluation of the sanctioned country’s currency, and increased market volatility and disruption in the sanctioned country and throughout the world. Sanctions and other similar measures could limit or prevent the Fund from buying and selling securities (in the sanctioned country and other markets), significantly delay or prevent the settlement of securities transactions, and significantly impact the Fund’s liquidity and performance. The Fund or the Investment Adviser may determine not to invest in, or may limit its overall investment in, a particular issuer, country or geographic region due to, among other things, heightened risks regarding sanctions, repatriation restrictions, confiscation of assets and property, expropriation or nationalization. Geopolitical developments in certain countries in which the Fund may invest have caused, or may in the future cause, significant volatility in financial markets. These and other geopolitical developments, including ongoing regional armed conflict in Europe and elsewhere, could negatively impact the value of the Fund’s investments.
The Fund will also be subject to the risk of negative foreign currency rate fluctuations, which may cause the value of securities denominated in such foreign currency (or other instruments through which the Fund has exposure to foreign currencies) to decline in value. Currency exchange rates may fluctuate significantly over short periods of time. Foreign risks will normally be greatest when the Fund invests in securities of issuers located in emerging countries. For more information about these risks, see Appendix A.
Foreign Custody Risk—The Fund may hold foreign securities and cash with foreign banks, agents, and securities depositories appointed by the Fund’s custodian (each a “Foreign Custodian”). Some Foreign Custodians may be recently organized or new to the foreign custody business. In some countries, Foreign Custodians may be subject to little or no regulatory oversight over or independent evaluation of their operations. Further, the laws of certain countries may place limitations on the Fund’s ability to recover its assets if a Foreign Custodian enters bankruptcy. Investments in emerging markets may be subject to even greater custody risks than investments in more developed markets. Custody services in emerging market countries are very often underdeveloped and may be considerably less well regulated than in more developed countries, and thus may not afford the same level of investor protection as would apply in developed countries.
Geographic Risk—If a Fund focuses its investments in securities of issuers located in a particular country or region, the Fund may be subjected, to a greater extent than if investments were less focused, to the risks of volatile economic cycles and/or conditions and developments that may be particular to that country or region such as: adverse securities markets; adverse exchange rates; adverse social, political, regulatory, economic, business, environmental or other developments; or natural disasters.
Greater China Risk—Investing in Greater China involves a higher degree of risk and special considerations not typically associated with investing in other more established economies or securities markets. A Fund’s investment exposure to Greater China may subject the Fund, to a greater extent than if investments were made in developed countries, to the risks of adverse securities markets, exchange rates and social, political, regulatory, economic or environmental events and natural disasters which may occur in the China region. The economy, industries, and securities and currency markets of Greater China are particularly vulnerable to the region’s dependence on exports and international trade and increasing competition from Asia’s other low-cost emerging economies. The imposition of tariffs or other trade barriers by the U.S. or foreign governments on exports from Mainland China may also have an adverse impact on Chinese issuers. In addition, currency fluctuations, currency convertibility, interest rate fluctuations and higher rates of inflation as a result of internal social unrest or conflicts with other countries have had, and may continue to have, negative effects on the economies and securities markets of Greater China.
26

Risks of the Funds
The universe of share issues currently available to foreign investors in Mainland China may be limited as compared with the universe of equity securities available in other markets. The government of the People’s Republic of China (“PRC”) exercises significant control over the economy in Mainland China, and may at any time alter or discontinue economic reforms. Investments in Greater China are subject to the risk of confiscatory taxation, nationalization or expropriation of assets, potentially frequent changes in the law, and imperfect information because companies in the China region may not be subject to the same disclosure, accounting, auditing and financial reporting standards and practices as U.S. companies. The willingness and ability of the PRC to support markets is uncertain. Taiwan and Hong Kong do not exercise the same level of control over their economies as does the PRC with respect to Mainland China, but changes to their political and economic relationships with the PRC could adversely impact the Fund’s investments in Taiwan and Hong Kong.
Interest Rate Risk—When interest rates increase, fixed income securities or instruments held by the Fund (which may include inflation protected securities) will generally decline in value. Long-term fixed income securities or instruments will normally have more price volatility because of this risk than short-term fixed income securities or instruments. A wide variety of market factors can cause interest rates to rise, including central bank monetary policy, rising inflation and changes in general economic conditions. Changing interest rates may have unpredictable effects on the markets, may result in heightened market volatility and may detract from Fund performance to the extent the Fund is exposed to such interest rates and/or volatility. In addition, changes in monetary policy may exacerbate the risks associated with changing interest rates. Funds with longer average portfolio durations will generally be more sensitive to changes in interest rates than funds with a shorter average portfolio duration. Fluctuations in interest rates may also affect the liquidity of fixed income securities and instruments held by the Fund.

It is difficult to predict the magnitude, timing or direction of interest rate changes and the impact these changes will have on the markets in which the Fund invests.
Investment Style Risk —Different investment styles (e.g., “growth,” “value” or “quantitative”) tend to shift in and out of favor depending upon market and economic conditions and investor sentiment. A Fund may outperform or underperform other funds that invest in similar asset classes but employ different investment styles. Examples of different investment styles include growth and value investing. Growth stocks may be more volatile than other stocks because they are more sensitive to investor perceptions of the issuing company’s growth of earnings potential. Growth companies are often expected by investors to increase their earnings at a certain rate. When these expectations are not met, investors can punish the stocks inordinately even if earnings showed an absolute increase. Also, because growth companies usually invest a high portion of earnings in their business, growth stocks may lack the dividends of some value stocks that can cushion stock prices in a falling market. Growth oriented funds will typically underperform when value investing is in favor. Value stocks are those that are undervalued in comparison to their peers due to adverse business developments or other factors. A value stock may decrease in price or fail to increase in price as anticipated if other investors do not eventually recognize the stock’s potential value, or if other events or factors that could increase the stock price do not materialize. Value-oriented funds may underperform in market cycles when growth investing is in favor.
Large Shareholder Transactions Risk— A Fund may experience adverse effects when certain large shareholders, such as other funds, institutional investors (including those trading by use of non-discretionary mathematical formulas), financial intermediaries (who may make investment decisions on behalf of underlying clients and/or include a Fund in their investment model), individuals, accounts and Goldman Sachs affiliates, purchase or redeem large amounts of shares of a Fund. Such large shareholder redemptions, which may occur rapidly or unexpectedly, may cause a Fund to sell portfolio securities at times when it would not otherwise do so, which may negatively impact a Fund’s NAV and liquidity. Similarly, large Fund share purchases may adversely affect a Fund’s performance to the extent that the Fund is delayed in investing new cash or otherwise maintains a larger cash position than it ordinarily would. These transactions may also accelerate the realization of taxable income to shareholders if such sales of investments resulted in gains, and may also increase transaction costs. In addition, a large redemption could result in a Fund’s current expenses being allocated over a smaller asset base, leading to an increase in the Fund’s expense ratio.
Liquidity Risk—The Fund may invest in securities or instruments that trade in lower volumes, that are less liquid than other investments and/or that may become illiquid or less liquid in response to market developments or adverse investor perceptions. Investments that are illiquid or that trade in lower volumes may be more difficult to value and more difficult to sell at the desired times and prices. When there is no willing buyer and investments cannot be readily sold at the desired time or price, the Fund may have to accept a lower price or may not be able to sell the security or instrument at all. An inability to sell one or more portfolio positions can adversely affect the Fund’s value or prevent the Fund from being able to take advantage of other investment opportunities.
Illiquidity can be caused by a drop in overall market trading volume, an inability to find a willing buyer, or legal restrictions on the securities’ resale. In addition, during certain periods, the liquidity of particular issuers or industries in which the Fund may invest, or all securities within a particular investment category in which the Fund may invest, may shrink or disappear suddenly and without warning as a result of adverse economic, market or political events (including periods of rapid interest rate changes), or adverse investor perceptions whether or not accurate. Liquidity risk is heightened during these periods.
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To the extent that the traditional dealer counterparties that engage in fixed income trading do not maintain inventories of bonds (which provide an important indication of their ability to “make markets”) that keep pace with the growth of the bond markets over time, relatively low levels of dealer inventories could lead to decreased liquidity and increased volatility in the fixed income markets. Additionally, market participants other than the Fund may attempt to sell fixed income holdings at the same time as the Fund, which could cause downward pricing pressure and contribute to decreased liquidity.
Liquidity risk may also refer to the risk that the Fund will not be able to pay redemption proceeds within the allowable time period stated in the Fund’s prospectus or without significant dilution to remaining investors’ interests because of unusual market conditions, declining prices of the securities sold, an unusually high volume of redemption requests or other reasons. While the Fund reserves the right to meet redemption requests through in-kind distributions, the Fund may instead choose to raise cash to meet redemption requests through sales of portfolio securities or permissible borrowings. If the Fund is forced to sell securities at an unfavorable time and/or under unfavorable conditions and prices, such sales may adversely affect the Fund’s NAV and dilute remaining investors’ interests.
Certain shareholders, including clients or affiliates of the Investment Adviser and/or other funds managed by the Investment Adviser, may from time to time own or control a significant percentage of the Fund’s shares. Redemptions by these shareholders of their shares of the Fund may further increase the Fund’s liquidity risk and may impact the Fund’s NAV. These shareholders may include, for example, institutional investors, funds of funds, discretionary advisory clients, accounts or Goldman Sachs affiliates and other shareholders, whose buy-sell decisions are controlled by a single decision-maker.
Management Risk —The strategy used by the Investment Adviser may fail to produce the intended results. The Investment Adviser attempts to execute a complex strategy for the Fund using proprietary quantitative models. Investments selected using these models may perform differently than expected as a result of the factors used in the models, the weight placed on each factor, changes from the factors’ historical trends, the speed that market conditions change and technical issues in the construction and implementation of the models (including, for example, data problems and/or software issues). The use of proprietary quantitative models could be adversely impacted by unforeseeable software or hardware malfunction and other technological failures, power loss, software bugs, malicious code such as “worms,” viruses or system crashes or various other events or circumstances within or beyond the control of the Investment Adviser. Certain of these events or circumstances may be difficult to detect.
Models that have been formulated on the basis of past market data may not be predictive of future price movements. Models may not be reliable if unusual or disruptive events cause market movements, the nature or size of which are inconsistent with the historical performance of individual markets and their relationship to one another or to other macroeconomic events. Models also rely heavily on data that may be licensed from a variety of sources, and the functionality of the models depends, in part, on the accuracy of voluminous data inputs. There is no guarantee that the Investment Adviser’s use of these quantitative models will result in effective investment decisions for the Fund. Additionally, commonality of holdings across quantitative money managers may amplify losses.
Market Risk—The value of the securities in which the Fund invests may go up or down in response to the prospects of individual companies, particular sectors or governments and/or general economic conditions throughout the world. Price changes may be temporary or last for extended periods. The Fund’s investments may be overweighted from time to time in one or more sectors or countries, which will increase the Fund’s exposure to risk of loss from adverse developments affecting those sectors or countries.
Global economies and financial markets are becoming increasingly interconnected, and conditions and events in one country, region or financial market may adversely impact issuers in a different country, region or financial market. Furthermore, local, regional and global events such as war, military conflict, acts of terrorism, social unrest, natural disasters, recessions, inflation, rapid interest rate changes, supply chain disruptions, sanctions, the spread of infectious illness or other public health threats could also adversely impact issuers, markets and economies, including in ways that cannot necessarily be foreseen. The Fund could be negatively impacted if the value of a portfolio holding were harmed by such political or economic conditions or events. In addition, governmental and quasi-governmental organizations have taken a number of unprecedented actions designed to support the markets. Such conditions, events and actions may result in greater market risk.
Mid-Cap and Small-Cap Risk—The securities of mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies involve greater risks than those associated with larger, more established companies and may be subject to more abrupt or erratic price movements. Securities of such issuers may lack sufficient market liquidity to enable a Fund to effect sales at an advantageous time or without a substantial drop in price. Both mid-capitalization and small-capitalization companies often have narrower markets and more limited managerial and financial resources than larger, more established companies. As a result, their performance can be more volatile and they face greater risk of business failure, which could increase the volatility of a Fund’s portfolio. Generally, the smaller the company size, the greater these risks become.
NAV Risk—The net asset value of a Fund and the value of your investment will fluctuate.
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Risks of the Funds
Non-Diversification Risk—The Goldman Sachs Emerging Markets Equity Insights Fund is non-diversified, meaning that it is permitted to invest a larger percentage of its assets in one or more issuers or in fewer issuers than diversified mutual funds. Thus, the Fund may be more susceptible to adverse developments affecting any single issuer held in its portfolio, and may be more susceptible to greater losses because of these developments.
Portfolio Turnover Rate Risk—The Funds may engage in active and frequent trading of portfolio securities to achieve their principal investment strategies. A high rate of portfolio turnover (100% or more) involves correspondingly greater expenses which must be borne by a Fund and its shareholders, and is also likely to result in short-term capital gains taxable to shareholders.
Stock Risk—Stock prices have historically risen and fallen in periodic cycles. U.S. and foreign stock markets have experienced periods of substantial price volatility in the past and may do so again in the future. Stock prices may fluctuate from time to time in response to the activities of individual companies and in response to general market and economic conditions. Individual companies may report poor results or be negatively affected by industry and/or economic trends and developments, and the stock prices of such companies may suffer a decline in response.
Swaps Risk—The use of swaps is a highly specialized activity which involves investment techniques and risk analyses different from those associated with ordinary portfolio securities transactions. A Fund’s transactions in equity swaps may be significant. These transactions can result in sizeable realized and unrealized capital gains and losses relative to the gains and losses from a Fund’s direct investments in equity securities and short sales.
Transactions in equity swaps can involve greater risks than if a Fund had invested in securities directly since, in addition to general market risks, swaps may be leveraged and subject to illiquidity risk, counterparty risk, credit risk and pricing risk. Regulators also may impose limits on an entity’s or group of entities’ positions in certain swaps. However, certain risks are reduced (but not eliminated) if a Fund invests in cleared swaps, which are transacted through a futures commission merchant and cleared through a clearinghouse that serves as a central counterparty. Because uncleared, bilateral swap agreements are two-party contracts and because they may have terms of greater than seven days, these swaps may be considered to be illiquid. Moreover, a Fund bears the risk of loss of the amount expected to be received under an equity swap in the event of the default or bankruptcy of a swap counterparty. Many swaps are complex and valued subjectively. Swaps may also be subject to pricing or “basis” risk, which exists when a particular derivative diverges from the price of corresponding cash market instruments. Under certain market conditions it may not be economically feasible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position in time to avoid a loss or take advantage of an opportunity. If a swap transaction is particularly large or if the relevant market is illiquid, it may not be possible to initiate a transaction or liquidate a position at an advantageous time or price, which may result in significant losses.
The value of equity swaps can be very volatile, and a variance in the degree of volatility or in the direction of securities prices from the Investment Adviser’s expectations may produce significant losses in a Fund’s investments in swaps. In addition, a perfect correlation between an equity swap and a security position may be impossible to achieve. As a result, the Investment Adviser’s use of equity swaps may not be effective in fulfilling the Investment Adviser’s investment strategies and may contribute to losses that would not have been incurred otherwise.
More information about the Funds’ portfolio securities and investment techniques, and their associated risks, is provided in Appendix A. You should consider the investment risks discussed in this section and in Appendix A. Both are important to your investment choice.
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Service Providers
INVESTMENT ADVISER
Investment Adviser
Fund
Goldman Sachs Asset Management, L.P. (“GSAM”)
200 West Street
New York, NY 10282
Emerging Markets Equity Insights
International Equity Insights
International Small Cap Insights
GSAM has been registered as an investment adviser with the SEC since 1990 and is an indirect, wholly-owned subsidiary of The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. and an affiliate of Goldman Sachs. Founded in 1869, The Goldman Sachs Group, Inc. is a publicly-held financial holding company and a leading global investment banking, securities and investment management firm. As of December 31, 2022, GSAM, including its investment advisory affiliates, had assets under supervision of approximately $2.30 trillion.
The Investment Adviser provides day-to-day advice regarding the Fund’s portfolio transactions. The Investment Adviser makes the investment decisions for the Fund and places purchase and sale orders for the Fund’s portfolio transactions in U.S. and foreign markets. As permitted by applicable law, these orders may be directed to any executing brokers, dealers, futures commission merchants or other counterparties, including Goldman Sachs and its affiliates. While the Investment Adviser is ultimately responsible for the management of the Fund, it is able to draw upon the research and expertise of its asset management affiliates for portfolio decisions and management with respect to certain portfolio securities. In addition, the Investment Adviser has access to the research and certain proprietary technical models developed by Goldman Sachs (subject to legal, internal, regulatory and Chinese Wall restrictions), and will apply quantitative and qualitative analysis in determining the appropriate allocations among categories of issuers and types of securities.
The Investment Adviser also performs the following additional services for the Funds (to the extent not performed by others pursuant to agreements with the Funds):
Supervises all non-advisory operations of the Fund
Provides personnel to perform necessary executive, administrative and clerical services to the Fund
Arranges for the preparation of all required tax returns, reports to shareholders, prospectuses and statements of additional information and other reports filed with the SEC and other regulatory authorities
Maintains the records of the Fund
Provides office space and all necessary office equipment and services
An investment in the Fund may be negatively impacted because of the operational risks arising from factors such as processing errors and human errors, inadequate or failed internal or external processes, failures in systems and technology, changes in personnel, and errors caused by third-party service providers or trading counterparties. The use of certain investment strategies that involve manual or additional processing, such as over-the-counter derivatives, increases these risks. Although the Fund attempts to minimize such failures through controls and oversight, it is not possible to identify all of the operational risks that may affect the Fund or to develop processes and controls that completely eliminate or mitigate the occurrence of such failures. The Fund and its shareholders could be negatively impacted as a result.
From time to time, Goldman Sachs or its affiliates may invest “seed” capital in the Fund. These investments are generally intended to enable the Fund to commence investment operations and achieve sufficient scale. Goldman Sachs and its affiliates may hedge the exposure of the seed capital invested in the Fund by, among other things, taking an offsetting position in the benchmark of the Fund.
MANAGEMENT FEES AND OTHER EXPENSE INFORMATION
As compensation for its services and its assumption of certain expenses, the Investment Adviser is entitled to the following fees, computed daily and payable monthly, at the annual rates listed below (as a percentage of each respective Fund’s average daily net assets):
Fund
Contractual
Management Fee
Annual Rate
Average Daily
Net Assets
Actual Rate
For the Fiscal Year
Ended
October 31, 2022*
Emerging Markets Equity Insights
1.00%
First $1 Billion
1.00%
 
1.00%
Next $1 Billion
 
 
0.90%
Next $3 Billion
 
 
0.86%
Next $3 Billion
 
 
0.84%
Over $8 Billion
 
30

Service Providers
Fund
Contractual
Management Fee
Annual Rate
Average Daily
Net Assets
Actual Rate
For the Fiscal Year
Ended
October 31, 2022*
International Equity Insights
0.81%
First $1 Billion
0.76%
 
0.73%
Next $1 Billion
 
 
0.69%
Next $3 Billion
 
 
0.68%
Next $3 Billion
 
 
0.67%
Over $8 Billion
 
International Small Cap Insights
0.85%
First $1 Billion
0.82%
 
0.85%
Next $1 Billion
 
 
0.77%
Next $3 Billion
 
 
0.73%
Next $3 Billion
 
 
0.72%
Over $8 Billion
 
*
The Actual Rate may not correlate to the Contractual Management Fee Annual Rate as a result of management fee waivers that may be in effect from time to time, including management fee waivers of underlying or affiliated underlying funds, if any.
The Investment Adviser may waive a portion of its management fee, including fees earned as the Investment Adviser to any of the affiliated funds in which the Funds invest, from time to time, and may discontinue or modify any such waiver in the future, consistent with the terms of any fee waiver arrangement in place.
A discussion regarding the basis for the Board of Trustees’ approval of the Management Agreement for the Funds in 2022 is available in the Funds’ Annual Report dated October 31, 2022.
The Investment Adviser has agreed to reduce or limit “Other Expenses” (excluding acquired fund fees and expenses, transfer agency fees and expenses, service fees and shareholder administration fees (as applicable), taxes, interest, brokerage fees, expenses of shareholder meetings, litigation and indemnification, and extraordinary expenses) to 0.054%, 0.004% and 0.014% of average daily net assets for the Emerging Markets Equity Insights, International Equity Insights and International Small Cap Insights Funds, respectively, through at least February 28, 2024, and prior to such date, the Investment Adviser may not terminate the arrangements without the approval of the Board of Trustees. The expense limitations may be modified or terminated by the Investment Adviser at its discretion and without shareholder approval after such date, although the Investment Adviser does not presently intend to do so. A Fund’s “Other Expenses” may be further reduced by any custody and transfer agency fee credits received by the Fund.
FUND MANAGERS
Quantitative Investment Strategies (“QIS”) Team
The individuals jointly and primarily responsible for the day-to-day management of the Funds are listed below. The Fund’s portfolio managers' individual responsibilities may differ and may include, among other things, development and maintenance of quantitative models and processes in combination with a qualitative overlay, asset allocation, risk budgeting and general oversight of research, implementation processes and the management of the Funds’ portfolios.
Name and Title
Fund Responsibility
Years
Primarily
Responsible
Five Year Employment History
Len Ioffe, CFA
Managing Director
Portfolio Manager—
Emerging Markets Equity Insights