UNITED STATES
SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION
WASHINGTON, DC 20549
 
FORM 6-K
 
REPORT OF FOREIGN PRIVATE ISSUER
PURSUANT TO RULE 13a-16 OR 15d-16 OF THE
SECURITIES EXCHANGE ACT OF 1934
 
26 July 2018
 
Commission File Number:  001-10691
 
DIAGEO plc
(Translation of registrant’s name into English)
 
 
Lakeside Drive, Park Royal, London NW10 7HQ
(Address of principal executive offices)
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant files or will file annual reports under cover Form 20-F or Form 40-F.
 
Form 20-F   X                                                                  Form 40-F  
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is submitting the Form 6-K in paper as permitted by Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(1):   
 
Indicate by check mark whether the registrant is submitting the Form 6-K in paper as permitted by Regulation S-T Rule 101(b)(7):  
 
 
Preliminary results, year ended 30 June 2018
26 July 2018
This document contains inside information
 
Strong performance reflects consistent and rigorous execution of our strategy
 
 
●  Reported net sales (£12.2 billion) and operating profit (£3.7 billion) were up 0.9% and 3.7%, respectively, as organic growth was partially offset by adverse exchange
 
●   All regions contributed to broad based organic growth, with organic net sales up 5.0% and organic volume up 2.5%
 
●   Organic operating profit was up 7.6%, improving organic operating margins by 78 basis points, as higher marketing investment was more than offset by efficiencies from our productivity programme
 
●   Cash flow continued to be strong, broadly in line with last year, with £3.1 billion net cash from operating activities and £2.5 billion free cash flow
 
●   Basic eps of 121.7 pence was up 14.8%. Pre-exceptional eps was 118.6 pence, up 9.3%, principally due to higher organic operating profit
 
●   On 26 July the Board approved a share buyback programme to return up to £2.0 billion to shareholders during the year ending 30 June 2019
 
●    The board recommended a final dividend increase of 5% bringing the full year dividend to 65.3 pence per share
 
See explanatory notes for explanation of the use of non-GAAP measures. 
 
Ivan Menezes, Chief Executive, commenting on the results said:
 
 
 
"Diageo has delivered another year of strong, consistent performance. Organic volume and net sales growth is broad based across regions and categories. We have expanded organic operating margin while increasing investment behind our brands ahead of organic net sales growth.
 
These results reflect the high performance culture we have created in Diageo, the ongoing rigorous execution of our strategy, our focus on the consumer and our ability to move swiftly on trends and insights.
 
During the year we returned £1.5 billion to shareholders through a share buyback.  We have delivered another year of strong cash flow generation in F18. Consequently, the Board has approved an additional share buyback programme of up to £2.0 billion during F19.
 
The changes we have made in the business and the shifts in culture we continue to drive, ensure we are well placed to capture opportunities and deliver sustained growth. Our financial performance expectations are unchanged and we expect to continue to invest in the business to deliver our mid-term guidance of consistent mid-single digit organic net sales growth and 175bps of organic operating margin expansion for the three years ending 30 June 2019."
 
 
 
 
Key financial information
For the year ended 30 June 2018
 
Summary financial information
 
 
2018
2017
Organic
growth
%
Reported growth
%
Volume
EUm
240.4
242.2
2
(1)
Net sales
£ million
12,163
12,050
5
1
Marketing
£ million
1,882
1,798
7
5
Operating profit before exceptional items
£ million
3,819
3,601
8
6
Exceptional operating items(i)
£ million
(128)
(42)
 
 
Operating profit
£ million
3,691
3,559
 
4
Share of associate and joint venture profit after tax
£ million
309
309
 
-
Exceptional non-operating gain(i)
£ million
-
20
 
 
Net finance charges
£ million
260
329
 
 
Exceptional taxation credit(i)
£ million
203
4
 
 
Tax rate including exceptional items
%
15.9
20.6
 
(23)
Tax rate before exceptional items
%
20.7
20.6
 
-
Discontinued operations (after tax)(i)
£ million
-
(55)
 
 
Profit attributable to parent company's shareholders
£ million
3,022
2,662
 
14
Basic earnings per share
pence
121.7
106.0
 
15
Earnings per share before exceptional items
pence
118.6
108.5
 
9
Recommended full year dividend
pence
65.3
62.2
 
5
(i)   For further details of exceptional items and discontinued operations items see Notes 3. Exceptional Items.
 
 
Outlook for exchange
Using exchange rates £1 = $1.33; £1 = €1.13, the exchange rate movement for the year ending 30 June 2019 is estimated to adversely impact net sales by approximately £70 million and operating profit by approximately £10 million.
 
Outlook for tax
The tax rate before exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2018 was 20.7%. Our current expectation is that the tax rate before exceptional items for the year ending 30 June 2019 will be in the range of 21% to 22% which reflects changing business mix and the increased levels of uncertainty in the current tax environment for most multinationals. For further details on taxation see Additional Financial Information (d) Taxation.
 
Share buyback programme
On 26 July 2017 the Board approved a share buyback programme to return up to £1.5 billion to shareholders during F18. The programme was completed in February 2018 with 58.9 million shares being repurchased. On 26 July 2018 the Board approved a new share buyback programme to return up to £2.0 billion to shareholders during the year ending 30 June 2019.
 
Acquisitions and disposals
The impact of acquisitions and disposals on the reported figures was primarily attributable to the acquisition of the Casamigos brand which was completed on 15 August 2017 and to the prior year change to a franchise model for some popular segment brands in India.
 
For further details on the impact of acquisitions and disposals see Explanatory Notes.
 
Net sales (£ million)
 
Reported net sales up 0.9% with organic growth partially offset by unfavourable exchange
Organic net sales growth of 5.0% driven by 2.5% volume growth and 2.5% positive price/mix
 
 
 
Net sales
£ million
2017
12,050
Exchange(i)
(454)
Acquisitions and disposals
(5)
Volume
288
Price/mix
284
2018
12,163
 (i)  Exchange rate movements reflect the translation of prior year reported results at current year exchange rates.
 
Reported net sales grew 0.9%, driven by organic growth which was partially offset by unfavourable exchange.
 
Organic volume growth of 2.5% and 2.5% of positive price/mix drove 5% organic net sales growth with organic growth delivered across all regions.
 
 
 
Operating profit (£ million)
 
Reported operating profit grew 3.7%
Organic operating profit grew 7.6%
 
 
 
 
Reported operating profit was up 3.7% with organic growth partially offset by exceptional operating items and adverse exchange. Organic operating profit grew ahead of net sales at 7.6%.
 
Operating profit
£ million
2017
3,559
Exceptional operating items
(86)
Exchange
(56)
Acquisitions and disposals
4
Organic movement
270
2018
3,691
 
Operating margin (%)
 
Reported operating margin increased 81bps
Organic operating margin increased 78bps
 
 
 
Operating margin
ppt
2017
29.5
Exceptional operating items
(0.70)
Exchange
0.69
Acquisitions and disposals
0.04
Gross margin
(0.43)
Marketing
(0.27)
Other operating expenses
1.48
2018
30.3
Reported operating margin increased 81bps driven by organic operating margin improvement and the positive impact on operating margin from exchange, due to the stronger negative impact of exchange on net sales relative to operating profit, which more than offset the impact from exceptional operating items. Organic operating margin improved 78bps driven primarily by our productivity programme partially offset by higher marketing spend.
 
Basic earnings per share (pence)
 
Basic eps epBasic eps increased 14.8% from 106.0 pence to 121.7 pence
Eps before exceptional items increased 9.3% from 108.5 pence to 118.6 pence
 
 
 
Basic earnings per share
pence
2017
106.0
Exceptional items after tax
3.3
Discontinued operations after tax
2.2
Exchange on operating profit
(2.3)
Acquisitions and disposals
0.2
Organic operating profit growth(i)
10.8
Net finance charges
3.0
Tax
(2.6)
Share buyback
1.2
Non-controlling interests
(0.1)
2018
121.7
(i)   Excluding exchange
 
Eps before exceptional items increased 10.1 pence driven by organic operating profit growth and lower finance charges partially offset by the negative impact from exchange and higher tax expense.
 
Basic eps increased by 14.8% being impacted by a benefit of exceptional items after tax and the lapping of discontinued losses in the year ended 30 June 2017. The net exceptional credit was due to the balance sheet re-measurement of our deferred tax liabilities in the US as a result of the headline rate reduction. This was partially offset by the tax charge as a result of the transfer pricing agreement reached with HMRC on the UK tax assessment and the impairment of certain of our assets in Africa Regional Markets.
 
Free cash flow (£ million)
 
Net cash from operating activities(i) was £3,084 million, a decrease of £48 million compared to the same period last year. Free cash flow was £2,523 million, a decrease of £140 million
 
 
Free cash flow
£ million
2017
2,663
Capex
(72)
Exchange(ii)
(56)
Operating profit(iii)
280
Working capital(iv)
(310)
Tax
(19)
Interest
62
Other(v)
(25)
2018
2,523
 
(i)    Net cash from operating activities excludes net capex, movements in loans and other investments ((£561) million in 2018 - (£469) million in 2017).
(ii)   Exchange on operating profit before exceptional items.
(iii)  Operating profit excluding exchange, depreciation and amortisation, post employment charges and non-cash items but including operating exceptional items.
(iv)  Working capital movement includes maturing inventory.
(v)   Other items include post employment payments, dividends received from associates and joint ventures, and loans and other investments.
 
 
Free cash flow continued to be strong at £2.5 billion. Operating profit growth was largely offset by increased investment in maturing stock and capex as well as lower operating working capital improvements year on year. Operating working capital improved but the benefits on free cash flow were lower than in the prior year.
 
 
 
 
 
Return on average invested capital (%)(i)
 
ROIC improved 48bps
 
 
 
Return on average invested capital
ppt
2017
13.8
Exchange
0.04
Acquisitions and disposals
(0.21)
Organic operating profit growth
1.24
Associates and joint ventures
(0.15)
Tax
(0.40)
Other
(0.04)
2018
14.3
 
(i)   ROIC calculation excludes exceptional items.
 
ROIC before exceptional items increased 48bps as organic operating profit growth was partially offset by the impact from acquisitions and disposals and higher underlying tax charges.
 
Reported growth by region
 
 
 
 
Volume
Net sales
Marketing
Operating profit(i)
 
%
EUm
%
£ million
%
£ million
%
 £ million
North America
2
0.8
(1)
(45)
3
20
(1)
(17)
Europe and Turkey
4
1.9
4
108
7
31
10
92
Africa
3
1.0
(4)
(65)
(5)
(8)
(12)
(27)
Latin America and Caribbean
5
1.1
2
25
1
1
23
58
Asia Pacific
(7)
(6.6)
3
84
13
45
17
81
Corporate
-
-
13
6
(56)
(5)
16
31
Diageo
(1)
(1.8)
1
113
5
84
6
218
 
 
Organic growth by region
 
 
 
Volume
Net sales
Marketing
Operating profit(i)
 
%
EUm
%
£ million
%
£ million
%
 £ million
North America
1
0.6
4
142
6
35
2
43
Europe and Turkey
4
1.7
4
110
6
28
8
74
Africa
3
1.0
3
39
2
3
(5)
(9)
Latin America and Caribbean
5
1.1
7
66
4
8
19
49
Asia Pacific
2
1.4
9
210
15
50
19
89
Corporate
-
-
11
5
(50)
(4)
13
24
Diageo
2
5.8
5
572
7
120
8
270
 
(i) Before operating exceptional items.
 
 
Notes to the business and financial review
 
 
Unless otherwise stated:
 
●            commentary below refers to organic movements
●            volume is in millions of equivalent units (EUm)
●            net sales are sales after deducting excise duties
●            percentage movements are organic movements
●            share refers to value share
 
See Explanatory Notes for explanation of the calculation and use of non-GAAP measures.
 
 
BUSINESS REVIEW
For the year ended 30 June 2018
 
North America
 
 
North America delivered net sales growth of 4% with US Spirits growing 3% and continued growth in both Diageo Beer Company USA (DBC USA) and Canada. In US Spirits, category share gains were achieved for all key brands except in vodka. Crown Royal grew 3% with Crown Royal Deluxe and Crown Royal Regal Apple growth accelerating, partially offset by Crown Royal Vanilla lapping its launch last year. Bulleit continued its double digit growth, up 10%. Scotch grew 4% with Johnnie Walker up 6%, driven by Johnnie Walker Black Label growing 5% and double digit growth in reserve variants. Baileys growth accelerated while Captain Morgan growth moderated as it cycled a strong performance last year. Vodka net sales, while declining 3%, showed some improvement versus last year driven by Ketel One vodka and Cîroc vodka. Smirnoff net sales were down 2%. Don Julio growth accelerated with net sales growing 37%. DBC USA net sales grew 5% with ready to drink growing 14% and beer declining 2%. Net sales in Canada were up 1%. Marketing in North America increased 6% and grew ahead of net sales as investment was up-weighted. Operating margin declined 58bps as the impact of increased marketing, hurricane remediation costs and logistics inflation more than offset the benefits from productivity initiatives. 
 
 Key financials £ million:
 
2017
FX
Reclassifi-
cation(i)
Acquisitions
and
disposals
Organic movement
2018
Reported movement  
%
 Net sales
4,161
(228)
(8)
49
142
4,116
(1)
 Marketing
642
(21)
(2)
8
35
662
3
 Operating profit
1,899
(60)
(4)
4
43
1,882
(1)
(i)   Reclassification comprises changes to a reallocation of the results of the Travel Retail operations to the geographical regions.
 
 
 
 
Markets:
 
 
 
 
 
Global giants, local stars and reserve(i):
 
Organic
volume
movement
Reported
volume
movement
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
 
Organic
volume
movement(ii)
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
%
%
%
%
 
 
%
%
%
 North America
1
2
4
(1)
 
 Crown Royal
2
3
(3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Smirnoff
(1)
(2)
(8)
 US Spirits
1
2
3
(1)
 
 Captain Morgan
-
(1)
(7)
 DBC USA
5
5
5
(1)
 
 Johnnie Walker
5
8
6
 Canada
-
-
1
(1)
 
 Ketel One vodka(iii)
3
(2)
(7)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Cîroc vodka
(1)
(4)
(10)
 Spirits
1
2
3
-
 
 Baileys
9
11
6
 Beer
(2)
(2)
(1)
(6)
 
 Guinness
(1)
-
(5)
 Ready to drink
11
11
12
6
 
 Tanqueray
4
3
(3)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Don Julio
36
37
30
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Bulleit
8
10
4
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Buchanan's
2
-
(5)
(i)   Spirits brands excluding ready to drink.
(ii)  Organic equals reported volume movement except Johnnie Walker 7%, Baileys 10% and Buchanan's 3% due to the reallocation of the Travel Retail operations.
(iii) Ketel One vodka includes Ketel One Botanicals.
 
 
●    Net sales in US Spirits were up 3%. Net sales were broadly in line with depletions. Crown Royal and Bulleit continued share gains in the Canadian whisky and US whiskey categories, respectively. The Generosity platform is working for Crown Royal, driving gains in equity and category share. Crown Royal net sales grew 3% with acceleration in Crown Royal Deluxe and Crown Royal Regal Apple growth partially offset by Crown Royal Vanilla cycling its launch last year. Johnnie Walker grew 6% with the successful 'Keep Walking America' platform being followed up by a new campaign 'Step Right up', scaled up 'liquid on lips' and continued focus on Johnnie Walker Blue Label in the gifting occasion. Buchanan's net sales were broadly flat with depletion performance improving in the second half and category share gains continuing. Vodka while declining, showed some improvement versus last year. Ketel One vodka benefitted from the execution of improved plans, as did the trademark from the launch of Ketel One Botanicals. Cîroc vodka saw some improvement in performance with the focus on core variants. Smirnoff net sales declined 2% with brand equity scores improving as it continued to remind consumers that it is a quality vodka at a great price. The 'Live like a Captain' campaign continues to resonate with consumers, driving category share and equity gains for Captain Morgan. Baileys growth accelerated versus last year as it reminded consumers of its indulgent treat positioning over the holidays. Don Julio net sales grew 37% with growth and category share gains accelerating versus last year.
●     DBC USA net sales increased 5% with ready to drink growing 14%. Ready to drink growth was driven by continued growth of Smirnoff Ice and Smirnoff Spiked Sparkling Seltzer, and the launch of Smirnoff Ice Smash. Beer declined 2% with Guinness declining 1%.
●     Net sales in Canada grew 1% driven by growth in Johnnie Walker, Baileys, Guinness and ready to drink. Johnnie Walker benefitted from a focus on Johnnie Walker Black Label highlighting its credentials to consumers through mentoring events, media and in-store activation. Guinness benefitted from the growth in the on-trade and the launch of Hop House 13 Lager.
●     Marketing grew 6% with the upweighting of marketing investment funded largely from productivity initiatives.
 
 
 
 
Europe and Turkey
 
 
The region delivered 4% net sales growth, reflecting another year of consistent performance in Europe where net sales were up 4% and a strong performance in Turkey growing net sales by 11%. Europe growth was largely driven by Great Britain, Ireland and Continental Europe, with continued share gains in spirits, up 50bps across Western Europe. Performance was led by strong growth in gin, where Tanqueray gained share in the fastest growing category and Gordon's benefitted from the launch of its Pink variant. Guinness was up 6% driven by a good performance for Guinness Draught supported by double digit growth in Hop House 13 Lager. Net sales of Captain Morgan grew 7%. Johnnie Walker grew 2% despite lapping a strong performance last year. Smirnoff declined 4% driven by Iberia and Great Britain, in line with the vodka category. In Turkey net sales were up 11% driven by volume growth of 5% and price increases across all categories. Operating margin improved 126bps as up-weighting in marketing investment was more than offset by ongoing productivity initiatives and lapping other one-off operating costs.
 
 Key financials £ million:
 
2017
FX
Reclassifi-
cation(i)
Acquisitions
and
disposals
Organic movement
2018
Reported movement  
%
 Net sales
2,824
(15)
16
(3)
110
2,932
4
 Marketing
443
2
1
-
28
474
7
 Operating profit before exceptional items
936
7
11
-
74
1,028
10
 Exceptional operating items(ii)
(33)
 
 
 
 
-
 
 Operating profit
903
 
 
 
 
1,028
 
(i)   Reclassification comprises changes to a reallocation of the results of the Travel Retail operations to the geographical regions.
(ii)  For further details of exceptional operating items see Notes 3. Exceptional Items.
 
 
Markets:
 
 
 
 
 
Global giants and local stars(ii):
 
Organic
volume
movement
Reported
volume
movement
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
 
Organic
volume
movement(iii)
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
%
%
%
%
 
 
%
%
%
 Europe
 
 
 
 
 
 Guinness
5
6
8
 and Turkey
4
4
4
4
 
 Johnnie Walker
2
-
8
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Smirnoff
(4)
(4)
(4)
 Europe(i)
5
7
4
8
 
 Baileys
8
6
7
 Turkey
5
5
11
(7)
 
 Yenì Raki
-
10
(9)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Captain Morgan
5
6
10
 Spirits
4
4
4
4
 
 JeB
(5)
(10)
(7)
 Beer
4
4
4
6
 
 Tanqueray
18
18
22
 Ready to drink
12
12
11
11
 
 
 
 
 
(i)   Following a change in management responsibilities the Europe market, from 1 July 2017, includes Russia and the Algeria, Iraq, Jordan, Lebanon and Morocco markets.
(ii)  Spirits brands excluding ready to drink.
(iii) Organic equals reported volume movement except Johnnie Walker 5% due to the reallocation of the Travel Retail operations.
 
●            In Europe, net sales were up 4%:
●     In Great Britain, net sales grew 8%. Tanqueray delivered strong double digit net sales growth and gained 30bps share in the fastest growing category across Western Europe and Gordon's benefitted from the successful launch of its Pink variant. Guinness net sales increased 8% and gained 30bps of share in the beer category, driven by a strong performance in Guinness Draught and Hop House 13 Lager. Scotch net sales were up 6% mainly driven by scotch malts and Johnnie Walker supported by incremental media activation, "liquid on lips" and additional off trade visibility. Smirnoff declined 2% in line with the vodka category. Reserve brands continued to deliver double digit growth, with strong performance led by our scotch portfolio.
●     Net sales in Ireland were up by 3%. Guinness grew 2% driven by the continued success of Hop House 13 Lager and the launch of the 'Behind every town' campaign across the country. In spirits, net sales were up 14% largely driven by strong performance in Gordon's and Tanqueray.
 
●     In Continental Europe, net sales were up 1%:
●      Iberia net sales declined 6% due to JeB driven by category decline and an increased competitive pricing environment.
●      In Central Europe, net sales declined 1%. Double digit growth in Tanqueray and good performance from Johnnie Walker in Poland were offset by a soft performance in Baileys as it lapped a strong performance in the prior year, a weaker performance of Captain Morgan and Smirnoff.
●          In Northern Europe net sales were flat as net sales growth in the Nordics was offset by a decline in Benelux as the spirits category slowly began to recover following a prior year excise increase. 
●          In the Mediterranean Hub, net sales were up 4% largely driven by Italy with broad growth across the spirits categories.
●      Europe Partner Markets grew net sales 8% driven by strong activations, innovation and performance improvement in Johnnie Walker and Guinness.
●          Russia net sales grew 14% with 5pps of positive price/mix driven by price increases in the previous year. Growth was largely driven by scotch led by Johnnie Walker and strong growth in Captain Morgan. 
●          In France, net sales were up 1%. Continued strong performance in Captain Morgan and Zacapa was partially offset by weakness in JeB.
●      In Turkey, net sales grew 11% with volume growth of 5% and excise led price increases as well as good raki and vodka performance.  
●     Marketing investment increased 6% focused on key growth opportunities for the region in Guinness, Johnnie Walker, reserve brands and gin. Productivity initiatives continued to improve the efficiency and effectiveness of the investment.
 
 
 
 
 
Africa
 
 
Africa net sales grew 3% with growth in Nigeria and with East Africa recovering from the first half impact of the uncertainty following the presidential election in Kenya. This was partially offset by weakness in Africa Regional Markets due to challenging conditions in Cameroon and Ethiopia, and a competitive environment in South Africa. Across Africa, beer net sales were up 5%, with strong growth of Dubic in Nigeria and the successful launch of Serengeti Lite in Tanzania. Guinness and Malta Guinness grew 7% and 4% respectively, while Senator Keg declined in Kenya. Mainstream spirits saw continued double digit growth in East Africa and Nigeria partially offset by soft performance of Smirnoff 1818 and primary scotch whiskies in South Africa. Scotch net sales declined 6%. Operating margin declined by 96bps driven by input cost inflation, adverse mix and one-off charges, partially offset by productivity savings in supply, lower indirect spend as well as organisational effectiveness benefits.
 
 
 Key financials £ million:
 
2017
FX
Reclassifi-
cation(i)
Acquisitions
and
disposals
Organic movement
2018
Reported movement  
%
 Net sales
1,556
(105)
1
-
39
1,491
(4)
 Marketing
166
(11)
-
-
3
158
(5)
 Operating profit before exceptional items
218
(20)
2
-
(9)
191
(12)
 Exceptional operating items(ii)
-
 
 
 
 
(128)
 
 Operating profit
218
 
 
 
 
63
(71)
(i)   Reclassification comprises changes to a reallocation of the results of the Travel Retail operations to the geographical regions and the results of North African countries which were formerly reported in the Africa geographical regions now being included in Europe and Turkey.
 
(ii)  For further details of exceptional operating items see Notes 3. Exceptional Items.
 
 
 
 
 
Markets:
 
 
 
 
 
Global giants and local stars(i):
 
Organic
volume
movement
Reported
volume
movement
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
 
Organic
volume
movement(ii)
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
%
%
%
%
 
 
%
%
%
 Africa
3
3
3
(4)
 
 Guinness
2
7
-
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Johnnie Walker
(5)
(4)
(5)
 East Africa
7
7
4
(2)
 
 Smirnoff
-
(10)
(12)
 Africa Regional
 Markets
(5)
(5)
(2)
(7)
 
 
 
 
 
 Nigeria
10
10
13
(4)
 
Other beer:
 South Africa
(1)
(1)
(3)
(4)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Malta Guinness
(4)
4
(10)
 Spirits
10
10
2
(1)
 
 Tusker
1
-
(6)
 Beer
-
-
5
(4)
 
 Senator
(12)
(12)
(17)
 Ready to drink
(2)
(2)
(1)
(7)
 
 Satzenbrau
(28)
(22)
(34)
(i)   Spirits brands excluding ready to drink.
(ii)  Organic equals reported volume movement except Johnnie Walker (4)% due to the reallocation of the Travel Retail operations.
 
 
 
●     In East Africa, net sales grew 4% with a stronger second half performance, with conditions normalising after the political uncertainty in the first half.  Beer net sales grew 4% as a decline in Senator Keg in Kenya was more than offset by the successful launch of Serengeti Lite in Tanzania and Guinness net sales growing 8%. Mainstream spirits continued to deliver strong performance driven by improved distribution, consumer promotions and new launches.
 
●    In Africa Regional Markets, net sales declined 2% with growth in Ghana more than offset by weakness in Cameroon, due to third party distributor challenges in the first half and social unrest, and in Ethiopia due to political instability, high inflation driven by currency devaluation and competitive pressures. This resulted in a double digit decline in scotch. Beer net sales were flat with double digit growth in Malta Guinness offset by a decline in Guinness in Cameroon. In Ghana net sales increased 7% with net sales growth in Malta Guinness and Guinness offsetting decline in ready to drink where Orijin faced increased competitive pressure.  
 
●      Net sales in South Africa declined 3% largely driven by decline in mainstream spirits, Smirnoff 1818 and primary scotch whiskies, which were impacted by price increases and an increased competitive environment.
 
●     In Nigeria, net sales grew 13%. Beer grew 15% with continued strong growth from Dubic post-launch in the prior year and Guinness, up 24%, as it benefitted from the on premise activation against football, leveraging the English Premier League and the football World Cup. In spirits, net sales were up 28% as a result of strong double digit growth in mainstream spirits driven by innovation launches and new formats.
 
●     Marketing investment increased 2%. In Nigeria, marketing was focused on key campaigns including Malta Guinness "Fuel Your Greatness" and Satz "Smart Choice". In East Africa, the focus of marketing investment was on the Guinness campaign "Meet The Legend", the Tusker "Here is to Us" campaign and the launch of Serengeti Lite.
 
 
 
Latin America and Caribbean
 
 
In Latin America and Caribbean net sales grew 7% with strong performances in Mexico, PUB, and PEBAC partially offset by weakness in the export channels and declines in the domestic markets of Caribbean and Central America. Growth in the region was broad based across categories. In scotch, net sales were up 3% with continued strong performance of Black & White in Brazil, Mexico and Colombia and Johnnie Walker was up 3% across the region. This was partially offset by a decline in Old Parr in Colombia and the export channels and in Buchanan's in Mexico. Don Julio delivered double digit growth. Gin also performed strongly with Tanqueray more than doubling its net sales with strong growth across the region driven by Brazil and Mexico. Smirnoff grew double digit driven by Argentina, Mexico and Brazil. Operating margin in the region increased 299bps as organisational effectiveness benefits, productivity savings and the lapping of one-off tax charges more than offset adverse mix.
 
 Key financials £ million:
 
2017
FX
Reclassifi-
cation(i)
Acquisitions
and
disposals
Organic movement
2018
Reported movement  
%
 Net sales
1,044
(43)
2
-
66
1,069
2
 Marketing
195
(8)
1
-
8
196
1
 Operating profit
250
10
(1)
-
49
308
23
(i)   Reclassification comprises changes to a reallocation of the results of the Travel Retail operations to the geographical regions
 
 
 
Markets:
 
 
 
 
 
Global giants and local stars(i):
 
Organic
volume
movement
Reported
volume
movement
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
 
Organic
volume
movement(ii)
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
%
%
%
%
 
 
%
%
%
 Latin America and
 
 
 
 
 
 Johnnie Walker
3
3
(3)
 Caribbean
5
5
7
2
 
 Buchanan's
(5)
(4)
(8)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Smirnoff
15
16
5
 PUB
6
6
11
3
 
 Old Parr
(4)
(11)
(12)
 Mexico
8
8
12
9
 
 Baileys
(3)
(4)
(9)
 CCA
(1)
(1)
(4)
(3)
 
 Ypióca
2
2
(6)
 Andean
(5)
(6)
(2)
(14)
 
 Black & White
38
56
47
 PEBAC
24
24
15
12
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Spirits
6
5
7
1
 
 
 
 
 
 Beer
3
3
4
5
 
 
 
 
 
 Ready to drink
(15)
(15)
(4)
(12)
 
 
 
 
 
(i)   Spirits brands excluding ready to drink.
(ii)  Organic equals reported volume movement except for Johnnie Walker 2%, Baileys (5)% and Old Parr (5)% due to the reallocation of the Travel Retail operations.
 
●    In PUB (Paraguay, Uruguay and Brazil) net sales increased 11%. In Brazil growth was broad based across spirits categories. Scotch net sales were up 11% driven by Black & White. In gin, Tanqueray net sales more than doubled through increased activation and distribution. Smirnoff net sales increased 4% through new formats to increase accessibility and the amplification of the cocktail culture through sponsorship of "The Best Caipiroska in Brazil" event. In Paraguay net sales increased double digit driven by scotch, Tanqueray and Cîroc underpinned by domestic market growth.
●     In Mexico net sales increased 12%. Growth was broad based but led by Don Julio which gained 1.8pps of share of the tequila category with increasing premiumisation from new innovations, Barricas and Reposado Claro. Scotch was flat with growth in Black & White offset by declines in Buchanan's whose performance was impacted by price increases. Smirnoff returned to growth, with improved performance on Smirnoff 21 and the launch of Smirnoff X1.
●    In CCA (Caribbean and Central America) net sales declined 4%. Hurricanes Irma and Maria impacted performance in the domestic markets where net sales declined 3%. Export channels net sales declined 5% as market conditions remained challenging with continuing currency weakness against the US dollar.
●     In Andean (Colombia and Venezuela) net sales declined 2% primarily driven by Colombia as last year's tax regulations resulted in higher retail selling prices for premium imported whisky, impacting the performance of Old Parr. As consumers traded down, Black & White was the biggest beneficiary supported by up-weighted media campaigns. In Venezuela volume declined 18% driven by locally produced brands as economic conditions continued to deteriorate.
●     PEBAC (Peru, Ecuador, Bolivia, Argentina and Chile) delivered net sales growth of 15% driven by Argentina and Chile as well as Ecuador where economic conditions improved. Growth was driven by scotch which gained share, and by increased distribution of Smirnoff. 
●      Marketing investment increased by 4%, driven by up weighted investment across the scotch portfolio focused on Johnnie Walker and Black & White.
 
 
Asia Pacific
 
 
In Asia Pacific net sales grew by 9% with strong growth in Greater China, India, and Travel Retail Asia and Middle East. This was partially offset by the continued contraction of the scotch category in Korea. Growth was broad based across the majority of spirits categories. Chinese white spirits continued to grow strong double digit. Net sales in India grew by 9% with strong second half growth as the impact of the Supreme Court ruling prohibiting the sale of alcohol in certain outlets near state highways was lapped. In scotch, net sales were up 4% as strong performance of Johnnie Walker in Travel Retail Asia and Middle East, South East Asia, and China Mainland was partially offset by the decline of Windsor in Korea. Net sales of reserve brands were up 29% driven by Chinese white spirits and Johnnie Walker Super Deluxe in Travel Retail Asia and Middle East and premium scotch in South East Asia. Operating margin in the region improved by 181bps as savings from both indirect spend and organisational effectiveness programmes more than offset the up-weighted marketing investment.
 
 
 Key financials £ million:
 
2017
FX
Reclassifi-
cation(i)
Acquisitions
and
disposals
Organic movement
2018
Reported movement  
%
 Net sales
2,419
(64)
(11)
(51)
210
2,503
3
 Marketing
343
(5)
-
-
50
388
13
 Operating profit before exceptional items
487
1
(8)
(1)
89
568
17
 Exceptional operating items(ii)
(9)
 
 
 
 
-
 
 Operating profit
478
 
 
 
 
568
19
(i)   Reclassification comprises changes to a reallocation of the results of the Travel Retail operations to the geographical regions.
(ii)  For further details of exceptional operating items see Notes 3. Exceptional Items.
 
 
Markets:
 
 
 
 
 
Global giants and local stars(ii):
 
Organic
volume
movement(i)
Reported
volume
movement
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
 
Organic
volume
movement(iii)
Organic
net sales
movement
Reported
net sales
movement
 
%
%
%
%
 
 
%
%
%
 Asia Pacific
2
(7)
9
3
 
Johnnie Walker
7
12
11
 
 
 
 
 
 
McDowell's
-
8
(3)
 India
1
(9)
9
(1)
 
Windsor
(12)
(19)
(20)
 Greater China
15
15
27
25
 
Smirnoff
6
2
1
 Australia
(2)
(2)
-
(4)
 
Guinness
5
4
-
 South East Asia
10
8
5
2
 
Bundaberg
(3)
(4)
(7)
 North Asia
1
1
(6)
(9)
 
Shui Jing Fang(iv)
50
63
61
 Travel Retail Asia
 and Middle East
11
5
22
20
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 Spirits
2
(7)
10
5
 
 
 
 
 
 Beer
4
4
3
(1)
 
 
 
 
 
 Ready to drink
(5)
(5)
(4)
(6)
 
 
 
 
 
(i)   Difference between organic and reported volume for Asia Pacific is driven by the move to a franchise model for some popular segment brands in India.
(ii)  Spirits brands excluding ready to drink.
(iii)  Organic equals reported volume movement except for Johnnie Walker 5% and McDowell's (9)% due to the reallocation of the Travel Retail operations, the change from an owned to a franchise model for some popular segment brands in India and the disposal of a subsidiary in Nepal.
(iv) Organic growth figures represent total Chinese white spirits of which Shui Jing Fang is the predominant brand.tl Chinese white spirits of which Shui Jing Fang is the predominant brand.
 
 
●       In India net sales increased 9% reflecting a strong acceleration in the second half as the business lapped the implementation of the Supreme Court ruling prohibiting the sale of alcohol in certain outlets near state highways. Prestige and above net sales grew 12% driven by McDowell's No. 1 supported by the launch of its "Never Drink and Drive" campaign, Royal Challenge which leveraged a partnership with T20 cricket through Royal Challengers Bangalore and celebrity endorsement of Signature. Scotch net sales were up 11% supported by up-weighted marketing investment. Rum net sales were up 3% driven by the national launch of Captain Morgan. The popular brand segment recovered in the second half following a focus on key states and brands, resulting in full year net sales growth of 4%.
●        In Greater China net sales increased 27% driven by Chinese white spirits which grew strong double digit through improved execution, expanded distribution and increased marketing investment. Scotch net sales declined 5% as strong double digit growth in mainland China in Johnnie Walker and The Singleton was more than offset by declines in Taiwan where scotch net sales declined by 15% as a result of commercial challenges and category contraction.
●         Net sales in Australia were flat. Growth in Guinness and Tanqueray, with the latter gaining 1.1pps of share, was offset by declines in Smirnoff and Bundaberg in the ready to drink category.
●        In South East Asia net sales increased 5% driven by double digit growth in Key Accounts where Johnnie Walker was supported by continued focus on route to consumer and seasonal gifting. Scotch net sales grew 11% with growth in all markets except Vietnam and Thailand.
●        In North Asia net sales declined 6% as scotch led growth in Japan driven by Johnnie Walker was more than offset by continued weakness in Korea. In Korea net sales declined 11% driven by Windsor as the scotch category continued to contract as consumers switched to lower alcohol content alternatives. This was partially offset by growth in the W range by Windsor, in the lower ABV segment, and Guinness, which both delivered double digit net sales gains.
●        Travel Retail Asia and Middle East net sales grew 22% with growth driven by scotch, particularly Johnnie Walker, as the Middle East lapped weak performance in the prior year along with expanded distribution and improved commercial activations.
●         Marketing investment increased 15% driven by investment in China and India.
 
 
CATEGORY AND BRAND REVIEW
 
Year ended 30 June 2018
 
Key categories:
 
Organic
volume
movement(iv)
%
Organic
net sales
movement
%
Reported
net sales
movement
%
Spirits(i)
3
5
2
  Scotch
3
2
1
  Vodka(ii)(iii)
1
(1)
(6)
  US whiskey
2
7
1
  Canadian whisky
-
2
(4)
  Rum(ii)
(3)
1
(4)
  Indian-Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) whisky
4
8
(1)
  Liqueurs
6
6
4
  Gin(ii)
17
16
14
  Tequila
35
40
56
Beer
1
4
(1)
Ready to drink
2
4
-
(i)   Spirits brands excluding ready to drink.
(ii)  Vodka, rum, gin including IMFL brands.
(iii)  Vodka includes Ketel One Botanicals.
(iv)  Organic equals reported volume movement except for spirits (1)%, rum (10)%, IMFL whisky (3)%, vodka flat, tequila 58% and gin 12%.
IMFL whisky was impacted by the move from an owned to a franchise model for some popular segment brands in certain states in India and the disposal of a subsidiary in Nepal, Tequila reported volume benefits from the Casamigos acquisition and other categories were impacted by the reallocation of the Travel Retail operations.
 
 
 
●    Scotch represents 25% of Diageo's net sales and was up 2% with growth in North America, Asia Pacific and Latin America and Caribbean partially offset by decline in Africa and Europe. Scotch growth was driven by Johnnie Walker, which delivered a strong performance with net sales up 5%, and primary scotch brands net sales increased 7% largely driven by Black & White in Latin America and Caribbean and Asia Pacific. Africa was impacted by South Africa's decline in primary scotch and the soft economic environment in Cameroon. In Europe performance was impacted by weakness in JeB. Elsewhere Windsor net sales were down double digit as it continued to suffer from the category decline in Korea and Old Parr performance was impacted by tax changes in Colombia. Net sales in scotch malts were up 1% with growth primarily in Great Britain and China Mainland partially offset by weakness of The Singleton in Taiwan.
 
●    Vodka represents 11% of Diageo's net sales and declined 1%, an improvement against the 4% decline last year. The net sales decline was driven predominantly by Smirnoff in US Spirits and Europe as well as Smirnoff 1818 in South Africa which continued to be impacted by the competitive pressure in the mainstream segment. This more than offset the good performance of Smirnoff in Latin America and Caribbean. Cîroc vodka and Ketel One vodka also declined with growth in Europe and Latin America and Caribbean more than offset by declines in US Spirits despite improved performance on both brands compared to last year.
 
●     US whiskey represents 2% of Diageo's net sales and grew 7% largely driven by Bulleit continuing to win share in the US whiskey category.
 
●     Canadian whisky represents 7% of Diageo's net sales and grew 2%. Net sales in Crown Royal grew 3% and continued to gain share in the Canadian whisky category of the US market.
 
●     Rum represents 7% of Diageo's net sales and grew 1% with broad based growth across all regions except North America where we continue to gain share despite category headwinds. Rum overall performance was largely driven by Captain Morgan, up 2%, as well as Zacapa that grew 8%. Captain Morgan and Zacapa performance more than offset declines in Parrot Bay, Bundaberg and Cacique.
 
●      IMFL whisky represents 5% of Diageo's net sales and grew 8% driven by strong performance of McDowell's No.1 and Royal Challenge.
 
●     Liqueurs represents 5% of Diageo's net sales and grew 6% driven by double digit growth of Baileys in US Spirits as the brand benefited from a new media campaign and 'liquid on lips' sampling activations and good performance in Europe due to Baileys Original, up 2%, strong recruitment via Baileys Almande and launch of time limited flavour Baileys Strawberries and Cream.
 
●      Gin represents 4% of Diageo's net sales and grew 16% with broad based growth across all regions. Tanqueray and Gordon's in Europe were the largest contributors to growth as both brands grew double digit.
 
●      Tequila represents 3% of Diageo's net sales and grew 40%. The performance was driven by strong double digit growth of Don Julio in US Spirits and Mexico.
 
●     Beer represents 16% of Diageo's net sales and grew 4%. Growth was largely driven by Guinness, Dubic and Serengeti Lite. Guinness net sales were up 5% with strong performance in Europe driven by Hop House 13 Lager and Guinness Draught. Nigeria also had a strong performance with Guinness growing 24%. In East Africa, performance of Senator was impacted by excise driven price increase and political instability.
 
●      Ready to drink represents 6% of Diageo's net sales and grew 4% driven by good performance in North America and Europe.
 
 
 
Global giants, local stars and reserve(i):
 
Organic
volume
movement(ii)
%
Organic
net sales
movement
%
Reported
net sales
movement
%
 
Global giants
 
 
 
 
Johnnie Walker
3
5
5
 
Smirnoff
-
(2)
(5)
 
Baileys
6
6
5
 
Captain Morgan
6
2
(1)
 
Tanqueray
14
15
12
 
Guinness
3
5
2
 
Local stars
 
 
 
 
Crown Royal
1
3
(3)
 
Yenì Raki
-
10
(9)
 
Buchanan's
(3)
(2)
(6)
 
JeB
(5)
(9)
(7)
 
Windsor
(13)
(19)
(20)
 
Old Parr
(3)
(9)
(10)
 
Bundaberg
(3)
(4)
(7)
 
Black & White
26
33
28
 
Ypióca
2
2
(7)
 
McDowell's(ii)
-
8
(3)
 
Shui Jing Fang(iii)
50
63
61
 
Reserve
 
 
 
 
Scotch malts(ii)
1
1
4
 
Cîroc vodka
1
(2)
(6)
 
Ketel One vodka
3
(1)
(7)
 
Don Julio
34
39
32
 
Bulleit
9
11
5
 
(i)   Spirits brands excluding ready to drink.
(ii)  Organic equals reported volume movement except for McDowell's (9)% and Scotch malts 2% which were impacted by the move from an owned to a franchise model in India.
(iii)  Organic growth figures represent total Chinese white spirits of which Shui Jing Fang is the predominant brand.
 
●     Global giants represent 41% of Diageo's net sales and grew 4%. Growth was broad based across all brands with the exception of Smirnoff whose net sales declined 2%.
 
●     Local stars represent 20% of Diageo's net sales and grew 6%, largely driven by strong growth of Chinese white spirits, IMFL whisky, Crown Royal in US Spirits and Black & White in Latin America and Caribbean. This was partially offset by declines of Windsor in Korea, JeB in Iberia and Old Parr in Colombia.
 
●     Reserve brands represent 18% of Diageo's net sales and grew 14% largely driven by strong double digit growth in Chinese white spirits and Don Julio. Net sales of Johnnie Walker reserve variants were up 8%. Double-digit growth in Tanqueray No. TEN and Bulleit more than offset declines in Ketel One vodka and Cîroc vodka.
 
 
 
ADDITIONAL FINANCIAL INFORMATION
Year ended 30 June 2018
 
SUMMARY INCOME STATEMENT
 
 
2017
Exchange
(a)
Acquisitions and disposals
(b)
Organic movement(ii)
2018
 
£ million
£ million
£ million
£ million
£ million
Sales
18,114
(724)
(147)
1,189
18,432
Excise duties
(6,064)
270
142
(617)
(6,269)
Net sales
12,050
(454)
(5)
572
12,163
Cost of sales
(4,680)
286
29
(269)
(4,634)
Gross profit
7,370
(168)
24
303
7,529
Marketing
(1,798)
44
(8)
(120)
(1,882)
Other operating expenses(i)
(1,971)
68
(12)
87
(1,828)
Operating profit before exceptional items
3,601
(56)
4
270
3,819
Exceptional operating items (c)
(42)
 
 
 
(128)
Operating profit
3,559
 
 
 
3,691
Non-operating items (c)
20
 
 
 
-
Net finance charges
(329)
 
 
 
(260)
Share of after tax results of associates and joint ventures
309
 
 
 
309
Profit before taxation
3,559
 
 
 
3,740
Taxation (d)
(732)
 
 
 
(596)
Profit from continuing operations
2,827
 
 
 
3,144
Discontinued operations (c)
(55)
 
 
 
-
Profit for the year
2,772
 
 
 
3,144
(i)   Before exceptional operating items, see Notes 3. Exceptional Items.
(ii)  For the definition of organic movement see Explanatory Notes.
 
(a) Exchange 
The impact of movements in exchange rates on reported figures is principally in respect of strengthening of sterling against the US dollar, the Turkish lira and the Kenyan shilling, partially offset by weakening of sterling against the euro.

The effect of movements in exchange rates and other movements on profit before exceptional items and taxation for the year ended 30 June 2018 is set out in the table below.
 
 
 
Gains/(losses)
 
 
£ million
   Translation impact
 
(117)
   Transaction impact
 
61
Operating profit before exceptional items
(56)
   Net finance charges - translation impact
 
1
   Impact of IAS 21 and IFRS 9 on net other finance charges
(8)
Net finance charges
 
(7)
Associates - translation impact
 
8
Profit before exceptional items and taxation
(55)
 
 
 
 
Year ended
 30 June 2018
Year ended
 30 June 2017
Exchange rates
 
1
    Translation  £1 =
$1.35
$1.27
    Transaction £1 =
$1.36
$1.45
    Translation  £1 =
€1.13
€1.16
    Transaction £1 =
€1.16
€1.22
 
(b) Acquisitions and disposals
The impact of acquisitions and disposals on the reported figures was primarily attributable to the acquisition of the Casamigos brand which was completed on 15 August 2017 and to the prior year move to a franchise model for some popular segment brands in India.
 
(c) Exceptional items
Exceptional operating charges in the year ended 30 June 2018 were £128 million before tax, an increase of £86 million against last year.
 
In the year ended 30 June 2018, an impairment charge of £128 million in respect of the Meta brand, Ethiopian tangible fixed assets, associated spare parts included in inventories and goodwill allocated to the Africa Regional Markets cash-generating unit has been recognised in other operating exceptional expenses. The £115 million net exceptional charge includes the reversal of deferred tax liabilities of £13 million. Forecast cash flow assumptions were reduced principally due to the devaluation of the Ethiopian birr increasing costs of imported raw materials and products, an increased competitive environment and political unrest in Ethiopia.
 
Operating items of £42 million in the year ended 30 June 2017 comprised:
●            a loss of £33 million in respect of a Turkish Competition Authority investigation into certain of Mey İçki's trading practices in Turkey.
●            a loss of £32 million in respect of a customer claim in India.
●            a gain of £23 million in respect of a settlement with Dr Vijay Mallya.
 
There were no non-operating items in the year ended 30 June 2018.
 
Non-operating items in the year ended 30 June 2017 comprised a net gain of £20 million in respect of the sale of Diageo's wines interests in the United States and its UK based Percy Fox business.
 
See Explanatory Notes for the definition of exceptional items.
 
Discontinued operations in the year ended 30 June 2017 comprised £55 million (net of deferred tax of £9 million) of additional amounts payable to the UK Thalidomide Trust.
 
(d) Taxation
The reported tax rate for the year ended 30 June 2018 was 15.9% compared with 20.6% for the year ended 30 June 2017. The tax rate before exceptional items for the year ended 30 June 2018 was 20.7% compared with 20.6% in the prior year.
Included in the tax charge of £596 million is a net exceptional tax credit of £203 million comprising the favourable impact of applying the Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, enacted on 22 December 2017, in the United States of £354 million, which was partially offset by the additional exceptional tax charge in respect of the transfer pricing agreement in the United Kingdom of £143 million and other net exceptional charges of £8 million.
In its interim announcement for the six months ended 31 December 2017, Diageo reported that discussions were being held with HMRC to seek clarity on Diageo's transfer pricing and related issues, and that a preliminary assessment for diverted profits tax notice had been issued. Final charging notices were issued in August 2017 and Diageo paid £107 million in respect of the two years ended 30 June 2016. Diageo agreed in June 2018 with HMRC that diverted profits tax does not apply and at the same time has reached resolution on the transfer pricing issues being discussed. The agreement in respect of transfer pricing covers the period from 1 July 2014 to 30 June 2017 and has resulted in an additional UK tax charge of £143 million. In the year ended 30 June 2018 an additional tax charge of £47 million has been recognised in current tax which is based on the approach agreed with HMRC.
As for most multinationals the current tax environment is creating increased levels of uncertainty. The current expectation is that the tax rate before exceptional items for the year ending 30 June 2019 will be approximately 21% to 22%.
 
(e) Dividend
The group aims to increase the dividend each year and the decision in respect of the dividend increase is made with reference to dividend cover as well as current performance trends including sales and profit after tax together with cash generation. Diageo targets dividend cover (the ratio of basic earnings per share before exceptional items to dividend per share) within the range of 1.8-2.2 times. For the year ended 30 June 2017 dividend cover was 1.7 times. The recommended final dividend for the year ended 30 June 2018 is 40.4 pence, an increase of 5% consistent with the interim dividend increase. This brings the full year dividend to 65.3 pence per share and dividend cover to 1.8 times. It is expected that a mid-single digit increase in the dividend will be maintained until the cover is comfortably back in the policy range.
Subject to approval by shareholders, the final dividend will be paid to holders of ordinary shares and ADRs on the register as of 10 August 2018. The ex-dividend date both for the holders of the ordinary shares and for US ADR holders is 9 August 2018. The final dividend will be paid to shareholders on 4 October 2018. Payment to US ADR holders will be made on 10 October 2018. A dividend reinvestment plan is available to holders of ordinary shares in respect of the final dividend and the plan notice date is 13 September 2018.
 
(f) Share buybacks
In the year ended 30 June 2018 the group completed a share buyback programme and repurchased and cancelled 58.9 million ordinary shares (representing 2.1% of the issued ordinary share capital) at an average price of £25.43 per share, and an aggregate cost of £1,507 million (including £9 million of transaction costs).
On 26 July 2018 the Board approved a new share buyback programme to return up to £2.0 billion to shareholders during the year ending 30 June 2019.
 
MOVEMENT IN NET BORROWINGS AND EQUITY
 
Movement in net borrowings
 
 
2018
2017
 
£ million
£ million
Net borrowings at the beginning of the year
(7,892)
(8,635)
Free cash flow (a)
2,523
2,663
Acquisition and sale of businesses (b)
(590)
(83)
Share buyback programme
(1,507)
-
Proceeds from issue of share capital
1
1
Net sale/(purchase) of own shares for share schemes (c)
8
(41)
Dividends paid to non-controlling interests
(80)
(83)
Rights issue proceeds from non-controlling interests of subsidiary company
26
-
Net movements in bonds (d)
1,041
(1,234)
Net movements in other borrowings
(26)
414
Equity dividends paid
(1,581)
(1,515)
Net (decrease)/increase in cash and cash equivalents
(185)
122
Net (increase)/decrease in bonds and other borrowings
(1,015)
820
Exchange differences (e)
80
(205)
Other non-cash items
(79)
6
Net borrowings at the end of the year
(9,091)
(7,892)
 
(a) See free cash flow for the analysis of free cash flow.
 
(b) In the year ended 30 June 2018 acquisitions and sale of businesses included $706 million (£549 million) in respect of the acquisition of Casamigos. In addition, the group is expected to pay contingent consideration of $300 million (£233 million) in tranches over the next ten years subject to Casamigos achieving certain performance targets.
In the year ended 30 June 2017 acquisitions and sale of businesses included part of the settlement of the guarantee in respect of the US wines disposal partially offset by the working capital settlement received from Treasury Wine Estates.
 
(c) Net purchase of own shares comprised purchase of treasury shares for the future settlement of obligations under the employee share option schemes of £68 million (2017 - £102 million) less receipts from employees on the exercise of share options of £76 million (2017 - £61 million).
 
(d) In the year ended 30 June 2018, the group issued bonds of €1,275 million (£1,136 million) and $2,000 million (£1,476 million) and repaid bonds of $2,100 million (£1,571 million). In the comparable period the group repaid bonds of $1,600 million (£1,234 million).
 
(e) Decrease in net borrowings of £80 million is primarily driven by the favourable exchange differences on US dollar denominated borrowings and foreign exchange swaps and forwards.
 
 
Movement in equity
 
 
2018
2017
 
£ million
£ million
Equity at the beginning of the year
12,028
10,180
Profit for the year
3,144
2,772
Exchange adjustments (a)
(609)
36
Remeasurement of post employment plans net of taxation
368
522
Rights issue proceeds from non-controlling interests of subsidiary company (b)
26
-
Dividends to non-controlling interests
(101)
(83)
Equity dividends paid
(1,581)
(1,515)
Share buyback programme
(1,507)
-
Other reserve movements
(55)
116
Equity at the end of the year
11,713
12,028
 
(a) Movement in the year ended 30 June 2018 primarily arose from exchange losses in respect of the Indian rupee and the Turkish lira partially offset by gains on the US dollar.
 
(b) In the year ended 30 June 2018 a rights issue was completed by Guinness Nigeria (GN) where Diageo's controlling equity share in GN increased from 54.32% to 58.02%. The transaction resulted in a credit of £31 million to non-controlling interests and a charge of £5 million to reserves.
 
 
Post employment plans
The net position of the group's post employment benefit plans improved by £554 million from a deficit of £491 million at 30 June 2017 to a surplus of £63 million at 30 June 2018. The change primarily arose due to an increase in the market value of the assets held by the post employment schemes, the contributions paid into the post employment plans being in excess of the income statement charge and an increase in returns from 'AA' rated corporate bonds used to calculate the discount rates on the liabilities of the post employment plans.
The operating profit charge decreased by £25 million from £109 million for the year ended 30 June 2017 to £84 million for the year ended 30 June 2018 primarily due to changes in pension obligations to members of the UK and Ireland pension plans.
Total cash contributions by the group to all post employment plans in the year ending 30 June 2019 are estimated to be approximately £200 million.
 
DIAGEO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED INCOME STATEMENT
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year ended
30 June 2018
 
Year ended
30 June 2017
 
Notes
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
 
 
 
 
 
Sales
2
 
18,432
 
18,114
Excise duties
 
 
(6,269)
 
(6,064)
Net sales
2
 
12,163
 
12,050
Cost of sales
 
 
(4,634)
 
(4,680)
Gross profit
 
 
7,529
 
7,370
Marketing
 
 
(1,882)
 
(1,798)
Other operating expenses
 
 
(1,956)
 
(2,013)
Operating profit
2
 
3,691
 
3,559
Non-operating items
 
 
-
 
20
Finance income
4
 
243
 
235
Finance charges
4
 
(503)
 
(564)
Share of after tax results of associates and joint ventures
 
 
309
 
309
Profit before taxation
 
 
3,740
 
3,559
Taxation
5
 
(596)
 
(732)
Profit from continuing operations
 
 
3,144
 
2,827
Discontinued operations
 
 
-
 
(55)
Profit for the year
 
 
3,144
 
2,772
 
 
 
 
 
 
Attributable to:
 
 
 
 
 
Equity shareholders of the parent company - continuing operations
 
 
3,022
 
2,717
Equity shareholders of the parent company - discontinued operations
 
 
-
 
(55)
Non-controlling interests
 
 
122
 
110
 
 
 
3,144
 
2,772
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Weighted average number of shares
 
 
million
 
million
Shares in issue excluding own shares
 
 
2,484
 
2,512
Dilutive potential ordinary shares
 
 
11
 
11
 
 
 
2,495
 
2,523
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
pence
 
pence
Basic earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
Continuing operations
 
 
121.7
 
108.2
Discontinued operations
 
 
-
 
(2.2)
 
 
 
121.7
 
106.0
 
 
 
 
 
 
Diluted earnings per share
 
 
 
 
 
Continuing operations
 
 
121.1
 
107.7
Discontinued operations
 
 
-
 
(2.2)
 
 
 
121.1
 
105.5
 
 
 
DIAGEO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF COMPREHENSIVE INCOME
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year ended
30 June 2018
 
Year ended
30 June 2017
 
 
£ million
 
£ million
Other comprehensive income
 
 
 
 
  Items that will not be recycled subsequently to the income
   statement
 
 
 
 
  Net remeasurement of post employment plans
 
 
 
 
    -  group
 
456
 
649
    -  associates and joint ventures
 
2
 
(8)
    -  non-controlling interests
 
1
 
3
  Tax on post employment plans
 
(91)
 
(122)
 
 
368
 
522
  Items that may be recycled subsequently to the income
   statement
 
 
 
 
  Exchange differences on translation of foreign operations
 
 
 
 
    -  group
 
(631)
 
105
    -  associates and joint ventures
 
3
 
120
    -  non-controlling interests
 
(72)
 
35
  Net investment hedges
 
91
 
(224)
  Tax on exchange differences - group
 
7
 
(2)
  Tax on exchange differences - non-controlling interests
 
2
 
-
  Effective portion of changes in fair value of cash flow hedges
 
 
 
 
    -  hedge of foreign currency debt of the group
 
(64)
 
(8)
    -  transaction exposure hedging of the group
 
22
 
(26)
    -  hedges by associates and joint ventures
 
(15)
 
5
    -  recycled to income statement - hedge of foreign currency debt of the group
 
6
 
(42)
    -  recycled to income statement - transaction exposure hedging of the group
 
(7)
 
142
    -  recycled to income statement - commodity price risk of the group
 
-
 
1
  Tax on effective portion of changes in fair value of cash flow hedges
 
14
 
(3)
  Hyperinflation adjustment
 
11
 
47
  Tax on hyperinflation adjustment
 
(11)
 
(21)
 
 
(644)
 
129
Other comprehensive (loss)/profit, net of tax, for the year
 
(276)
 
651
Profit for the year
 
3,144
 
2,772
Total comprehensive income for the year
 
2,868
 
3,423
 
 
 
 
 
Attributable to:
 
 
 
 
Equity shareholders of the parent company - continuing operations
 
2,815
 
3,330
Equity shareholders of the parent company - discontinued operations
 
-
 
(55)
Non-controlling interests
 
53
 
148
Total comprehensive income for the year
 
2,868
 
3,423
 
 
 
 
 
 
DIAGEO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED BALANCE SHEET
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
30 June 2018
 
30 June 2017
 
 
Notes
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
Non-current assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Intangible assets
 
 
12,572
 
 
 
12,566
 
 
 
Property, plant and equipment
 
 
4,089
 
 
 
4,014
 
 
 
Biological assets
 
 
23
 
 
 
21
 
 
 
Investments in associates and joint ventures
 
 
3,009
 
 
 
2,824
 
 
 
Other investments
 
 
46
 
 
 
31
 
 
 
Other receivables
 
 
46
 
 
 
58
 
 
 
Other financial assets
9
 
182
 
 
 
267
 
 
 
Deferred tax assets
 
 
122
 
 
 
134
 
 
 
Post employment benefit assets
 
 
935
 
 
 
281
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
21,024
 
 
 
20,196
 
Current assets
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Inventories
6
 
5,015
 
 
 
4,788
 
 
 
Trade and other receivables
 
 
2,678
 
 
 
2,592
 
 
 
Assets held for sale
 
 
24
 
 
 
 
 
-
 
Corporate tax receivable
 
 
65
 
 
 
-
 
 
 
Other financial assets
9
 
35
 
 
 
81
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
7
 
874
 
 
 
1,191
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
8,691
 
 
 
8,652
 
Total assets
 
 
 
 
29,715
 
 
 
28,848
 
Current liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Borrowings and bank overdrafts
7
 
(1,828)
 
 
 
(2,459)
 
 
 
Other financial liabilities
9
 
(230)
 
 
 
(215)
 
 
 
Trade and other payables
 
 
(3,950)
 
 
 
(3,563)
 
 
 
Corporate tax payable
 
 
(243)
 
 
 
(294)
 
 
 
Provisions
 
 
(109)
 
 
 
(129)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(6,360)
 
 
 
(6,660)
 
Non-current liabilities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Borrowings
7
 
(8,074)
 
 
 
(6,583)
 
 
 
Other financial liabilities
9
 
(212)
 
 
 
(383)
 
 
 
Other payables
 
 
(209)
 
 
 
(24)
 
 
 
Provisions
 
 
(288)
 
 
 
(286)
 
 
 
Deferred tax liabilities
 
 
(1,987)
 
 
 
(2,112)
 
 
 
Post employment benefit liabilities
 
 
(872)
 
 
 
(772)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
(11,642)
 
 
 
(10,160)
 
Total liabilities
 
 
 
 
(18,002)
 
 
 
(16,820)
 
Net assets
 
 
 
 
11,713
 
 
 
12,028
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Share capital
 
 
780
 
 
 
797
 
 
 
Share premium
 
 
1,349
 
 
 
1,348
 
 
 
Other reserves
 
 
2,133
 
 
 
2,693
 
 
 
Retained earnings
 
 
5,686
 
 
 
5,475
 
 
 
Equity attributable to equity
  shareholders of the parent company
 
 
 
 
9,948
 
 
 
10,313
 
Non-controlling interests
 
 
 
 
1,765
 
 
 
1,715
 
Total equity
 
 
 
 
11,713
 
 
 
12,028
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DIAGEO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN EQUITY  
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Equity
attributable
to parent
company
shareholders
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Retained earnings/(deficit)
 
 
 
 
 
 
Share
capital
 
Share
premium
 
Other
reserves
 
Own
shares
 
Other
retained
earnings
 
Total
 
 
Non-
controlling
interests
 
Total
equity
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
At 30 June 2016
797
 
1,347
 
2,625
 
(2,189)
 
5,950
 
3,761
 
8,530
 
1,650
 
10,180
Profit for the year
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
2,662
 
2,662
 
2,662
 
110
 
2,772
Other comprehensive income
-
 
-
 
68
 
-
 
545
 
545
 
613
 
38
 
651
Employee share schemes
-
 
-
 
-
 
13
 
(23)
 
(10)
 
(10)
 
-
 
(10)
Share-based incentive plans
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
34
 
34
 
34
 
-
 
34
Share-based incentive plans
 in respect of associates
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
3
 
3
 
3
 
-
 
3
Tax on share-based
 incentive plans
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
12
 
12
 
12
 
-
 
12
Shares issued
-
 
1
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
1
 
-
 
1
Purchase of non-controlling
 interests by associates
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(5)
 
(5)
 
(5)
 
-
 
(5)
Change in fair value of put options
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(12)
 
(12)
 
(12)
 
-
 
(12)
Dividends paid
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(1,515)
 
(1,515)
 
(1,515)
 
(83)
 
(1,598)
At 30 June 2017
797
 
1,348
 
2,693
 
(2,176)
 
7,651
 
5,475
 
10,313
 
1,715
 
12,028
Adoption of IFRS 15 (note 1)
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(89)
 
(89)
 
(89)
 
(2)
 
(91)
Adoption of IFRS 9 by associate
-
 
-
 
(3)
 
-
 
3
 
3
 
-
 
-
 
-
Profit for the year
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
3,022
 
3,022
 
3,022
 
122
 
3,144
Other comprehensive (loss)/income
-
 
-
 
(574)
 
-
 
367
 
367
 
(207)
 
(69)
 
(276)
Employee share schemes
-
 
-
 
-
 
32
 
(7)
 
25
 
25
 
-
 
25
Share-based incentive plans
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
39
 
39
 
39
 
-
 
39
Share-based incentive plans
 in respect of associates
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
4
 
4
 
4
 
-
 
4
Tax on share-based
 incentive plans
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(2)
 
(2)
 
(2)
 
-
 
(2)
Shares issued
-
 
1
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
1
 
-
 
1
Disposal of non-controlling interests
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(1)
 
(1)
Purchase of non-controlling
 interests
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(72)
 
(72)
 
(72)
 
70
 
(2)
Purchase of rights issue of
 non-controlling interests
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(5)
 
(5)
 
(5)
 
31
 
26
Change in fair value of put
 option
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
7
 
7
 
7
 
-
 
7
Share buyback programme
(17)
 
-
 
17
 
-
 
(1,507)
 
(1,507)
 
(1,507)
 
-
 
(1,507)
Dividends declared
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
(1,581)
 
(1,581)
 
(1,581)
 
(101)
 
(1,682)
At 30 June 2018
780
 
1,349
 
2,133
 
(2,144)
 
7,830
 
5,686
 
9,948
 
1,765
 
11,713
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
DIAGEO CONDENSED CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF CASH FLOWS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Year ended
30 June 2018
 
Year ended
30 June 2017
 
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
Cash flows from operating activities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Profit for the year
 
3,144
 
 
 
2,772
 
 
Discontinued operations
 
-
 
 
 
55
 
 
Taxation
 
596
 
 
 
732
 
 
Share of after tax results of associates and joint ventures
 
(309)
 
 
 
(309)
 
 
Net finance charges
 
260
 
 
 
329
 
 
Non-operating items
 
-
 
 
 
(20)
 
 
Operating profit
 
 
 
3,691
 
 
 
3,559
Increase in inventories
 
(271)
 
 
 
(159)
 
 
(Increase)/decrease in trade and other receivables
 
(202)
 
 
 
89
 
 
Increase in trade and other payables and provisions
 
314
 
 
 
221
 
 
Net (increase)/decrease in working capital
 
 
 
(159)
 
 
 
151
Depreciation, amortisation and impairment
 
493
 
 
 
361
 
 
Dividends received
 
159
 
 
 
223
 
 
Post employment payments less amounts included in operating profit
 
(108)
 
 
 
(111)
 
 
Other items
 
10
 
 
 
(6)
 
 
 
 
 
 
554
 
 
 
467
Cash generated from operations
 
 
 
4,086
 
 
 
4,177
Interest received
 
167
 
 
 
180
 
 
Interest paid
 
(418)
 
 
 
(493)
 
 
Taxation paid
 
(751)
 
 
 
(732)
 
 
 
 
 
 
(1,002)
 
 
 
(1,045)
Net cash from operating activities
 
 
 
3,084
 
 
 
3,132
Cash flows from investing activities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Disposal of property, plant and equipment and computer software
 
40
 
 
 
46
 
 
Purchase of property, plant and equipment and computer software
 
(584)
 
 
 
(518)
 
 
Movements in loans and other investments
 
(17)
 
 
 
3
 
 
Sale of businesses
 
4
 
 
 
(52)
 
 
Acquisition of businesses
 
(594)
 
 
 
(31)
 
 
Net cash outflow from investing activities
 
 
 
(1,151)
 
 
 
(552)
Cash flows from financing activities
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Share buyback programme
 
(1,507)
 
 
 
-
 
 
Proceeds from issue of share capital
 
1
 
 
 
1
 
 
Net sale/(purchase) of own shares for share schemes
 
8
 
 
 
(41)
 
 
Dividends paid to non-controlling interests
 
(80)
 
 
 
(83)
 
 
Rights issue proceeds from non-controlling interests
 
26
 
 
 
-
 
 
Proceeds from bonds
 
2,612
 
 
 
-
 
 
Repayment of bonds
 
(1,571)
 
 
 
(1,234)
 
 
Net movements on other borrowings
 
(26)
 
 
 
414
 
 
Equity dividends paid
 
(1,581)
 
 
 
(1,515)
 
 
Net cash outflow from financing activities
 
 
 
(2,118)
 
 
 
(2,458)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net (decrease)/increase in net cash and cash equivalents
 
 
 
(185)
 
 
 
122
Exchange differences
 
 
 
(39)
 
 
 
(14)
Net cash and cash equivalents at beginning of the year
 
 
 
917
 
 
 
809
Net cash and cash equivalents at end of the year
 
 
 
693
 
 
 
917
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Net cash and cash equivalents consist of:
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Cash and cash equivalents
 
 
 
874
 
 
 
1,191
Bank overdrafts
 
 
 
(181)
 
 
 
(274)
 
 
 
 
693
 
 
 
917
 
    
 
NOTES
 
1. Basis of preparation
 
The condensed financial information of the group are prepared in accordance with International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRSs) as issued by the IASB and as adopted by the EU. As required by the Disclosure and Transparency Rules of the Financial Conduct Authority, the condensed set of financial statements has been prepared applying the accounting policies and presentation that were applied in the preparation of the company's published consolidated financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2017 except for the impact of the adoption of new accounting standards and amendments explained below. IFRS is subject to ongoing review and endorsement by the EU or possible amendment by interpretative guidance and the issuance of new standards by the IASB. In preparing these condensed financial information, the significant judgements made by management when applying the group's accounting policies and the significant areas where estimates were required were the same as those that applied to the consolidated financial statements for the year ended 30 June 2017, with the exception of the adoption of IFRS 9 and IFRS 15 and interpretations of accounting standards, as described below, and changes in estimates disclosed in note 12 - Contingent liabilities and legal proceedings.
Having reassessed the principal risks the directors considered it appropriate to adopt the going concern basis of accounting in preparing the condensed consolidated financial statements.
 
 
New accounting standards and interpretations
 
The following amendments to the accounting standards, issued by the IASB which have been endorsed by the EU, have been adopted by the group from 1 July 2017 with no impact on the group's consolidated results, financial position or disclosures:
 
●            Amendments to IAS 7 - Disclosure initiative
●            Amendment to IAS 12 - Recognition of deferred tax assets for unrealised losses
●            Amendment to IFRS 12 - Disclosure of interests in other entities
 
The following standards issued by the IASB and endorsed by the EU have been early adopted by the group from 1 July 2017:
 
IFRS 9 - Financial instruments replaces IAS 39 (Financial instruments - Recognition and measurement) and addresses the classification and measurement of financial instruments, introduces new principles for hedge accounting and a new forward-looking impairment model for financial assets.
The adoption of IFRS 9 hedge accounting principles did not result in a restatement of the group's results and the impact on the year ended 30 June 2018 is not material. The adoption of IFRS 9 did not result in any changes in the measurement or classification of financial instruments as at 1 July 2017.  All classes of financial assets and financial liabilities had as at 1 July 2017 the same carrying values under IFRS 9 as they had under IAS 39.
Diageo's principal associate, Moët Hennessy has adopted IFRS 9. This has no impact on Diageo's share of the net assets of Moët Hennessy but resulted in a decrease in the group's hedging reserve of £3 million with a corresponding increase in retained earnings. This change has been disclosed as a movement in the year ended 30 June 2018.
 
IFRS 15 - Revenue from contracts with customers provides enhanced detail on the principle of recognising revenue to reflect the concept that revenue should be recognised when the control of goods or services is transferred to the customer at a value that the company is expected to receive. It replaces the separate models for goods, services and construction contracts under previous IFRS (IAS 11, IAS 18 and related interpretations) which was based on the concept of the transfer of risks and rewards. It also provides further guidance on the initial measurement of sales on contracts which have discounts, rebates and consignment inventories by identifying separate performance obligations that may apply. 
During the year ended 30 June 2017 the group carried out a detailed review of the recognition criteria for revenue applying the requirements of IFRS 15 to ensure that the same principles were being applied consistently across the group. This review in particular examined promotional and marketing support payments made to customers post the initial sale of product, the timing of the recognition of sales made where a third party manufactures or modifies a product on behalf of Diageo and consignment inventories. On application of IFRS 15 some changes in accounting policy resulted, principally in respect of variable consideration receivable where the criteria applied for deducting future promotional payments from the initial revenue recognition was more stringent than under the former accounting policy. Management have also ensured that this policy is being adopted consistently across the group. The revised accounting policy establishes that revenue is recognised to the extent that it is highly probable that a reversal in the amount of revenue recognised will not occur when the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently settled. This means that Diageo, under the revised accounting policy, deducts from the initial revenue recognised any future promotional payments to direct and indirect customers unless it is highly probable that they will not be incurred.
Diageo has adopted the modified retrospective transition method, recognising the cumulative effect of initially applying IFRS15 as an adjustment to the balance of retained earnings as at 1 July 2017.
 
Retained earnings at 1 July 2017 has been debited by £89 million. The adjustment comprised an increase in creditors of £116 million, a decrease in debtors of £9 million, an increase in inventories of £8 million, a decrease in non-controlling interests of £2 million and an increase in deferred tax assets of £26 million. The changes in accounting policy that resulted in these adjustments are principally in respect of variable consideration where the criteria for deducting future promotional payments from the initial revenue recognition is more stringent than under the former accounting policy. The revised accounting policy establishes that revenue is recognised to the extent that it is highly probable that a reversal in the amount of cumulative revenue recognised will not occur when the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently settled. This means that Diageo, under the new accounting policy, deducts from the initial revenue recognised any future promotional payments unless it is highly probable that they will not be incurred.
For the year ended 30 June 2018, as a result of applying the new accounting policy, sales increased by £11 million, operating profit increased by £12 million, taxation was £3 million higher and profit for the year increased by £9 million.
The operating profit benefit in the year was more than offset by the impact to sales and profit of working capital efficiencies, including inventory reductions, delivered by Diageo's customers.
Consideration was also given to the disclosure of revenue into different categories. It was determined that all revenue would be disclosed as 'sale of goods' as revenue from other sources was immaterial.
 
IFRIC agenda decision - In October 2017 the IFRIC clarified that interest and penalties in respect of corporate taxes should generally be accounted for under IAS 37 rather than IAS 12 and therefore not be disclosed in the income statement within 'Taxation'. For comparative years Diageo disclosed interest and penalties in respect of corporate taxes as part of 'Taxation' in the consolidated income statement and consolidated balance sheet. As a result of the clarification by the IFRIC Diageo has changed its accounting policy from 1 July 2017. In addition, for consistency, Diageo has changed its treatment of interest arising on indirect tax. For the year ended 30 June 2018, £10 million of interest and £2 million of penalties in respect of corporate tax and indirect taxes was charged to other finance charges and operating profit, respectively. At 30 June 2017, the cumulative interest and penalties in respect of corporate tax included in 'Corporate tax payable' in the consolidated balance sheet was £37 million. At 30 June 2018 the cumulative interest in respect of corporate taxes is included in interest payable (£34 million) and penalties within other payables (£2 million). Interest and penalties in respect of indirect taxes in the consolidated balance sheet are immaterial. Comparatives have not been restated as the amounts are immaterial.
 
 
The following standard issued by the IASB and endorsed by the EU, has not yet been adopted by the group:
 
IFRS 16 - Leases (effective in the year ending 30 June 2020) sets out the principles for the recognition, measurement, presentation and disclosure of leases for both the lessee and the lessor. It eliminates the classification of leases as either operating leases or finance leases currently required under IAS 17 and introduces a single lessee accounting model where the lessee is required to recognise assets and liabilities for all material leases. All material leases will be recognised on the balance sheet as right of use assets and depreciated on a straight line basis. The liability, recognised as part of net borrowings, will be measured at a discounted value and any interest will be charged to finance charges in the income statement. Therefore, the charge to the income statement for the operating lease payment will be replaced with depreciation on the right of use asset and the interest charge inherent in the lease.
 
The group will implement IFRS 16 from 1 July 2019 by applying the modified retrospective method, meaning that the comparative figures in the financial statements for the year ending 30 June 2020 will not be restated to show the impact of IFRS 16. The operating leases which will be recorded on the balance sheet following implementation of IFRS 16 are principally in respect of warehouses, office buildings, plant and machinery, cars and distribution vehicles. The group has decided to reduce the complexity of implementation to take advantage of a number of practical expedients on transition on 1 July 2019 namely:
(i) to measure the right of use asset at the same value as the lease liability
(ii) to apply the short term and low value exemptions
(iii) to treat, wherever possible, services provided as an income statement item and only capitalise the lease payment amounts in respect of the asset
 
The anticipated impact of the standard on the group is not yet known though is not expected to be material on the income statement or net assets though assets and liabilities will be grossed up for the net present value of the outstanding operating lease liabilities as at 1 July 2019.
 
The following standard, issued by the IASB has not been endorsed by the EU and has not been adopted by the group:
 
IFRS 17 - Insurance contracts (effective in the year ending 30 June 2022) is ultimately intended to replace IFRS 4.
Based on a preliminary assessment the group believes that the adoption of IFRS 17 will not have a significant impact on its consolidated results or financial position.
 
There are a number of other amendments and clarifications to IFRS, effective in future years, which are not expected to significantly impact the group's consolidated results or financial position.
 
The comparative figures for the financial year ended 30 June 2017 are not the company's statutory accounts for that financial year. Those accounts have been reported on by the company's auditor, PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP and delivered to the registrar of companies. The report of the auditor (i) was unqualified, (ii) did not include a reference to any matters to which the auditor drew attention by way of emphasis without qualifying their report and (iii) did not contain a statement under section 498 (2) or (3) of the Companies Act 2006.
 
 
2. Segmental information
 
The segmental information presented is consistent with management reporting provided to the Executive Committee (the chief operating decision maker).
The Executive Committee considers the business principally from a geographical perspective based on the location of third party sales and the business analysis is presented by geographical segment. In addition to these geographical selling segments, a further segment reviewed by the Executive Committee is the International Supply Centre (ISC), which manufactures products for other group companies and includes the production sites in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Italy and Guatemala.
Continuing operations also include the Corporate function. Corporate revenues and costs are in respect of central costs, including finance, marketing, corporate relations, human resources and legal, as well as certain information systems, facilities and employee costs that are not allocable to the geographical segments or to the ISC. They also include rents receivable and payable in respect of properties not used by the group in the manufacture, sale or distribution of premium drinks.
Diageo uses shared services operations, including captive and outsourced centres, to deliver transaction processing activities for markets and operational entities. These centres are located in Hungary, Kenya, Colombia, the Philippines and India. The captive business service centre in Budapest also performs certain central finance activities, including elements of financial planning and reporting and treasury. The results of shared service operations are recharged to the regions.
The segmental information for net sales and operating profit before the impact of acquisitions and disposals, ISC allocation and exceptional items is reported at budgeted exchange rates in line with management reporting. For management reporting purposes the group measures the current year at, and restates the prior year net sales and operating profit to, the current year's budgeted exchange rates. These exchange rates are set prior to the financial year as part of the financial planning process and provide a consistent exchange rate to measure the performance of the business throughout the year. The adjustments required to retranslate the segmental information to actual exchange rates and to reconcile it to the group's reported results are shown in the tables below. The comparative segmental information, prior to retranslation, has not been restated at the current year's budgeted exchange rates but is presented at the budgeted rates for the year ended 30 June 2017.
In addition, for management reporting purposes Diageo presents separately the result of acquisitions and disposals completed in the current and prior year from the results of the geographical segments. The impact of acquisitions and disposals on net sales and operating profit is disclosed under the appropriate geographical segments in the tables below at budgeted exchange rates. 
 
 
Year ended
North America
 
Europe and Turkey(ii)
 
Africa
 
Latin America and Caribbean
 
Asia
Pacific
 
ISC
 
Eliminate
inter-
segment
sales
 
Total
operating
segments
 
Corporate
and other
 
Total
30 June 2018
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
 
£ million
Sales
4,671
 
5,232
 
2,083
 
1,352
 
5,042
 
1,457
 
(1,457)
 
18,380
 
52
 
18,432
Net sales
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
At budgeted exchange rates(i)
4,138
 
2,821
 
1,467
 
1,064
 
2,555
 
1,512
 
(1,425)
 
12,132
 
48
 
12,180
Acquisitions and disposals
50
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
50
 
-
 
50
ISC allocation
11
 
53
 
4
 
11
 
8
 
(87)
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Retranslation to actual
 exchange rates
(83)
 
58
 
20
 
(6)
 
(60)
 
32
 
(32)
 
(71)
 
4
 
(67)
Net sales
4,116
 
2,932
 
1,491
 
1,069
 
2,503
 
1,457
 
(1,457)
 
12,111
 
52
 
12,163
Operating profit/(loss)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
At budgeted exchange rates(i)
1,925
 
941
 
180
 
298
 
588
 
112
 
-
 
4,044
 
(160)
 
3,884
Acquisitions and disposals
4
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
4
 
-
 
4
ISC allocation
14
 
67
 
5
 
14
 
12
 
(112)
 
-
 
-
 
-
 
-
Retranslation to actual
 exchange rates
(61)
 
20
 
6
 
(4)
 
(32)
 
-
 
-
 
(71)
 
2
 
(69)
Operating profit/(loss)
 before exceptional items
1,882
 
1,028
 
191
 
308
 
568